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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Dr Rhidian Hughes

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Rhidian Hughes

People with dementia are prone to persistent walking (also known as ‘wandering’). Walking can bring physical and psychological benefits, but people with dementia also walk…

Abstract

People with dementia are prone to persistent walking (also known as ‘wandering’). Walking can bring physical and psychological benefits, but people with dementia also walk because of anxiety or confusion. People with dementia are at risk of becoming lost or involved in accidents, and this raises concerns for them and their carers. Electronic surveillance and tracking, as a form of safer walking technology, can be used to monitor people's whereabouts and is being used in dementia care. The technology raises a number of practical and ethical issues. This article reviews the key themes and arguments surrounding its use, with a view to raising issues for further debate. The article shows the need to carefully balance people's freedom and rights, including the right to take risks, with care and safety concerns.

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2012

Tsung‐hsi Fu and Rhidian Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent to which Taiwan's current policy agenda is moving towards an improved system of integrated health and social services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the extent to which Taiwan's current policy agenda is moving towards an improved system of integrated health and social services. The paper informs debates about integrated care internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study draws on existing literature and policy documents to analyse the progress of integrated care in Taiwan, with wider implications identified internationally.

Findings

For many years Taiwan's health care and social services were separated, however, there is growing momentum for integrated care in politics, policy and practice. There are, however, a number of critical issues that need to be addressed if Taiwan is to realise its ambitions for a truly integrated system.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small case study and overview, with the limited aim of exploring Taiwan's progress in an international context.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to an emerging body of literature on integrated care in Taiwan (some only available in Chinese), which will be of interest to policy makers and planners, not only in East Asia but internationally.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Rhidian A. Hughes, Anu Sinha, Fiona Aspinal, Maria Dunckley, Julia Addington‐Hall and Irene J. Higginson

Clinical outcome measures are used in clinical audit to monitor the quality of care provided to patients. As information technology (IT) is increasingly being integrated…

Abstract

Clinical outcome measures are used in clinical audit to monitor the quality of care provided to patients. As information technology (IT) is increasingly being integrated into the delivery of health care, computerising the use of clinical outcome measures has been proposed. However, little is known about the attitudes of health professionals towards this. Aims to understand professionals’ views on adapting one clinical outcome measure – the palliative care outcome scale (POS) – for use on hand‐held computers. Concludes that these results reinforce existing research on clinical outcome measures and IT in health care; identify special palliative care issues when considering the use of computerised clinical outcome measures with patients; and highlight the need for further research.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Rhidian Hughes

Quality has an established history in health care. Audit, as a means of quality assessment, is well understood and the existing literature has identified links between…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality has an established history in health care. Audit, as a means of quality assessment, is well understood and the existing literature has identified links between audit and research processes. This paper reviews the relationships between audit and research processes, highlighting how audit can be improved through the principles and practice of social research.

Design/methodology/approach

The review begins by defining the audit process. It goes on to explore salient relationships between clinical audit and research, grouped into the following broad themes: ethical considerations, highlighting responsibilities towards others and the need for ethical review for audit; asking questions and using appropriate methods, emphasising transparency in audit methods; conceptual issues, including identifying problematic concepts, such as “satisfaction”, and the importance of reflexivity within audit; emphasising research in context, highlighting the benefits of vignettes and action research; complementary methods, demonstrating improvements for the quality of findings; and training and multidisciplinary working, suggesting the need for closer relationships between researchers and clinical practitioners.

Findings

Audit processes cannot be considered research. Both audit and research processes serve distinct purposes.

Originality/value

Attention to the principles of research when conducting audit are necessary to improve the quality of audit and, in turn, the quality of health care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Virginia McCririck and Rhidian Hughes

NHS reforms in England led to the establishment of Local Education and Training Board (LETBs) to ensure the future supply of staff. LETBs have an important role in…

Abstract

Purpose

NHS reforms in England led to the establishment of Local Education and Training Board (LETBs) to ensure the future supply of staff. LETBs have an important role in addressing health and social care integration. This paper aims to stimulate debate, ideas and opportunities to improve integrated workforce planning, practice and policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a thought leadership article which presents a distillation of key policy and strategy, drawing out implications for policy makers and workforce planners at a strategic level.

Findings

The paper describes and critically appraises the role of LETBs in supporting integration between health and social care. The key messages include: ensure social care and public health representation on the board, track education and training decisions against commissioning priorities, focus on outcomes and transition points, build health‐related skills in social care, support providers and use performance measures of integration.

Practical implications

LETBs need to demonstrate an open and transparent approach to workforce education and planning. All partners need to engage including social care and public health service commissioners and providers.

Originality/value

There is a substantial body of literature on integration, although much less is devoted to examining workforce. This article will be of particular interest to LETB leaders, those responsible for reviewing and assessing the performance of LETBs as well as social care leaders and workforce planners. In addition the article will be of interest to those supporting integrated workforce planning and development across the UK and internationally.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Rhidian Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review the leadership challenges in workforce planning, paying special reference to adult social care primarily in England…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and review the leadership challenges in workforce planning, paying special reference to adult social care primarily in England (UK) whilst raising leadership issues that have international resonance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint which presents a distillation of key issues, challenges and relevant literature spanning workforce planning, human resources and social care.

Findings

The paper finds that growing demands on services, rising expectations for personalised care and support, together with the provision of safe and effective joined up care are some of the key drivers facing social care and wider public services. Leaders need to ensure a robust data and evidence base, sound interpretation of intelligence as well as building integrated approaches to workforce planning both within and between services.

Practical implications

Workforce leadership provides the bedrock to ensuring social care builds the workforce required for the future. As services undergo redesign and transformation the workforce planning task is more important now than ever and is a key responsibility for every organisation's leadership, including chief executives, commissioners and workforce specialists.

Originality/value

Workforce planning in social care is afforded relatively little attention and the analysis presented in this paper provides the stimulus for debate.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Chris Abbott

Abstract

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Peter Gilbert

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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