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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Rhiannon Hodson and Elizabeth Cooke

This article examines the challenges facing agencies working across social care, health, education and voluntary sector boundaries in leading a drive for evidence‐informed…

Abstract

This article examines the challenges facing agencies working across social care, health, education and voluntary sector boundaries in leading a drive for evidence‐informed practice (EIP). A study conducted by Research in Practice has identified the competencies and functions that managers deem most important to lead an EIP initiative successfully. Views about agencies' current capabilities and confidence to do so vary. Leadership development opportunities are generally perceived as poor. Plans are outlined for an action learning project within the Research in Practice network to support managers to lead EIP effectively.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Rhiannon Hodson and Steve Pitt

Research in the personal social services has historically been something of a side‐show, but various developments are combining to bring it centrestage. Unless these are…

Abstract

Research in the personal social services has historically been something of a side‐show, but various developments are combining to bring it centrestage. Unless these are managed strategically, the danger is that the impact of evidence on practice will remain at the margins. This article describes how Hampshire's Social Services Department has set about developing a strategy to support evidence‐based practice.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Jill Bamforth, Charles Jebarajakirthy and Gus Geursen

The money management behaviour of undergraduates is a noteworthy study for many stakeholders, as these students are more likely to carry forward this behaviour into later…

Abstract

Purpose

The money management behaviour of undergraduates is a noteworthy study for many stakeholders, as these students are more likely to carry forward this behaviour into later life. The literature on student money management behaviour heavily focuses on financial literacy. However, economic, social and psychological factors also affect undergraduates’ money management behaviour. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to empirically investigate how undergraduates respond to and account for these factors in their money management behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was carried out in Australia. This study adopted a qualitative exploratory approach. The data were collected using six focus group discussions (FGDs) held in one Australian university, in which 40 undergraduates participated.

Findings

The key themes identified from the thematic analysis include undergraduates’ understanding of money management and managing economic, social and psychological aspects relating to undergraduates’ money management behaviour. Several subthemes were identified under each theme, which specifically showed how undergraduates manage and respond to each of these factors relating to their money management behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted with the data collected from a relatively small sample of respondents and was limited only to undergraduates. Moreover, this study was conducted in Australia, indicating that some of the results might be specific to the Australian context.

Practical implications

The authors have suggested promoting multiple payment methods and internet usage to undergraduates, and providing them with stress management programmes will help them maintain prudent money management behaviour.

Originality/value

The extant literature on undergraduates’ money management behaviour tends to focus on financial literacy. This study extends the scope of the literature beyond financial literacy and has shown how undergraduates respond to economic, social and psychological aspects relating to money management behaviour. This study has applied a qualitative exploratory approach, in contrast to quantitative methods which have generally been applied for studies relating to undergraduates’ money management behaviour.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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