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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Hassan Gholipour Fereidouni and Reza Tajaddini

This paper aims to investigate whether cultural dimension of power distance, which is the extent that inequality is expected and accepted in societies, can explain underlying…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether cultural dimension of power distance, which is the extent that inequality is expected and accepted in societies, can explain underlying differences in landlord-tenant practices (LTP) across countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a sample covering countries from different regions. They apply the ordered probit regressions to estimate the relationships between the explanatory variables and LTP.

Findings

The results show that hierarchical societies demonstrate more pro-landlord practices. This finding is robust to alternative measures of power distance and different sample sizes. In addition, the authors find that countries with larger rental sectors and larger numbers of landlords with mortgages demonstrate more pro-tenant practices. The results also show that differences in LTP across countries are not significantly influenced by legal origin.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, very limited studies have investigated the determinants of LTP across countries. In addition, while cultural values such as power distance have been used to explain the economic, social and financial variables, less, if any, number of studies have used them to explain the variation of real estate market variables such as LTP.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Reza Tajaddini, Hassan F. Gholipour and Amir Arjomandi

The purpose of this study is to explain the potential long-term impacts of working from home on housing wealth inequality in large cities of advanced economies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explain the potential long-term impacts of working from home on housing wealth inequality in large cities of advanced economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is descriptive research and It supports the arguments by providing some emerging evidence from property markets in developed countries.

Findings

The authors argue that due to the unique nature of the COVID-19 crisis, it will have a different and long-term impact on housing wealth inequality. Changes in the working arrangements of many professionals will change the housing demand dynamic across different suburbs and may lead to a reduction of the housing wealth gap in the long term. In this paper, the authors propose five mechanisms that may impact housing wealth inequality.

Research limitations/implications

Long-term data is required to test the proposed conceptual model in this study and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth across and within suburbs of large cities.

Practical implications

Policymakers and regulators may benefit from the discussions and suggestions provided in this study and consider the proposed avenues on how new changes in the working environment (remote working) may result in a reduction of housing wealth inequality.

Originality/value

This study presents a new perspective about the potential long-term impacts of working from home that is posed by the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth inequality in large cities of developed economies.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Hassan F. Gholipour, Elias Oikarinen and Reza Tajaddini

The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between banks’ lending to public and private sectors and house prices using data from the Iranian banking system including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between banks’ lending to public and private sectors and house prices using data from the Iranian banking system including, commercial government-owned banks (CGBs), specialized government-owned banks and private banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use quarterly data from the second quarter of 2004 to the first quarter of 2016 and apply structural vector autoregression models.

Findings

The results show that: a positive shock to the loan supply to the private sector triggers a positive response from house prices; a positive shock to the loan supply to the public sector does not trigger a positive response from house prices; house price appreciations contribute significantly to banks’ lending to the public sector but not lending to the private sector; each loan supply by three different types of banks influences house prices positively; and CGBs’ lending to the private sector does not respond to house price shocks.

Originality/value

Although the relationship between banks’ lending and house prices is well-established in the literature, existing studies have not yet examined whether bank ownership matters for the link between banks’ lending and house prices.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Hassan F. Gholipour, Hooi Hooi Lean, Reza Tajaddini and Anh Khoi Pham

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact that foreign investment in existing houses and new housing development has on residential house prices and the growth of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact that foreign investment in existing houses and new housing development has on residential house prices and the growth of the housing construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a panel cointegration method, estimated using annual data for all Australian states and territories spanning the period of 1990-2013.

Findings

The results indicate that increases in foreign investment in existing houses do not significantly lead to increases in house prices. On the other hand, a 10 per cent increase in foreign investment for housing development decreases house prices by 1.95 per cent. We also find that foreign real estate investments have a positive impact on housing construction activities in the long run.

Originality/value

Existing studies used aggregate foreign real estate investment in their analyses. As foreign investment in existing houses and foreign investment for housing development have different impacts on the demand and supply sides of housing market, it is crucial that the analysis of the effects of foreign investment in residential properties on real estate market is conducted for each type differently.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Reza Tajaddini and Hassan F. Gholipour

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the news-based economic policy uncertainty (EPU), research and development (R&D) expenditures per capita and…

1997

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the news-based economic policy uncertainty (EPU), research and development (R&D) expenditures per capita and innovation outputs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 1996 to 2015 for 19 countries (Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States) are used. The authors apply country and year fixed-effects models for the estimations.

Findings

The study findings show that higher levels of EPU are positively associated with higher R&D expenditures per capita as well as innovation outputs (patent applications, patent grants and trademark applications).

Practical implications

This study deepens our understanding on the policy uncertainty–economic activities nexus and expands the literature on uncertainty, which is still at an initial phase of development, leading to generate a variety of open research questions for further investigation and study (Bloom, 2014).

Originality/value

There has not been an empirical investigation on the links between EPU and R&D expenditures and innovation outputs across several countries. The authors address this gap in the literature.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Sara Abhari, Alireza Jalali, Mastura Jaafar and Reza Tajaddini

This paper aims to investigate the economic impacts of the current coronavirus disease, which is globally known as (COVID-19) pandemic, on small businesses in the tourism and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the economic impacts of the current coronavirus disease, which is globally known as (COVID-19) pandemic, on small businesses in the tourism and hospitality industry, including food and beverages (F&B) industries in Malaysia during and after the enforcement of the Movement Control Order (MCO) and conditional (CMCO) with the emergence of new business models.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the implemented methodology involved a secondary qualitative research design based mainly on the existing literature, the World Health Organisation (WHO) reports, the government’s documents, in addition to online sources and observations regarding local business experiences.

Findings

The findings revealed that implementing effective strategies of recovery, shaping resilience solutions and supporting policies such as the National Recovery Plan, which is backed by the government played a pivotal role in avoiding the turndown of small businesses.

Originality/value

This critical review is submitted as an original research paper, which aims to provide important perspectives regarding the COVID-19 pandemic impacts on the tourism and hospitality industry in Malaysia. This paper serves as a scholarly platform for further in-depth studies on various resilience solutions of small businesses.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Mohammad Reza Khalilnezhad and Dak Kopec

This study aims to assess each of the seven segments of the Akbarieh Garden as the World Heritage Cultural Landscape. First, we wanted to identify the macro elements that…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess each of the seven segments of the Akbarieh Garden as the World Heritage Cultural Landscape. First, we wanted to identify the macro elements that dominated one's perception within each area. Then, we wanted to identify the micro elements that support the vista in its entirety.

Design/methodology/approach

To acquire data, we used a Participant Observer (PO) method as part of a Continuous/Stop-Motion (CSM) procedure. The identification of macro elements came from retrospective recollections derived from the continuous walk method—the stop-walk method allowed for the identification of micro elements. The data gained from this method is then used to understand how one interprets and responds to large—multi-segmented sites such as the Akbarieh Garden.

Findings

The results of this study show the Continuous/Stop-Motion method yielded predictable results with macro elements and elements of interest being easily recalled. However, the use of photographing for the stop-walk method revealed a similar focus on the macro element. We had hypothesized that the micro elements would be the elements of fascination and discovered when the person remained in the area to photograph scenes of interest. However, the PO photographed the macro elements. It wasn't until the post photo analysis that the PO identified some of the micro elements would be the elements of fascination and discovered when the person remained in the area to photograph scenes of interest. However, the PO photographed the macro elements. It wasn't until the post photo analysis that the PO identified some of the micro elements. The post photo discoveries suggest that real-time experience of micro elements is undervalued.

Originality/value

There is no general discussion on this topic yet amongst professionals. The initiative of the Participant Observer (PO) method as a tool for perception the historic gardens and landscapes identified that gap and its related necessity to provide guidance. As is true for exploratory studies, these results provide a foundation for further study. The use of the Continuous/Stop-Motion method was ideal for this study.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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