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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Martin Frischer, Graeme Ford and Rex Taylor

While there has been increasing recognition of the general proposition that the elderly are not a homogenous population there have been few attempts to delineate the…

Abstract

While there has been increasing recognition of the general proposition that the elderly are not a homogenous population there have been few attempts to delineate the characteristics of sub‐groups varying on dimensions of well‐being, such as health and psychological state. This may be due to the difficulty researchers have encountered in finding a rational basis for differentiating elderly people. However, there are also conceptual and methodological reasons which have contributed towards the neglect of this topic.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

David Clark, Kathryn McCann, Ken Morrice and Rex Taylor

In her recent discussion of women's incorporation into their husbands' employment Janet Finch produces a useful maxim for prospective wives:

Abstract

In her recent discussion of women's incorporation into their husbands' employment Janet Finch produces a useful maxim for prospective wives:

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1952

The work of Dr. Hassall on behalf of The Lancet, briefly summarised in a previous essay, received great publicity in the lay Press between 1852 and 1855. The Times and The

Abstract

The work of Dr. Hassall on behalf of The Lancet, briefly summarised in a previous essay, received great publicity in the lay Press between 1852 and 1855. The Times and The Quarterly Review gave the subject special prominence. The last named journal, in a review of Dr. Hassall's book in 1855, said: “The precision with which he is enabled to state the result of his labours leaves no appeal… We have now shown enough to convince the public that the grossest fraud reigns throughout the British public commissariat. It remains to be seen whether the Government is able and willing to stay this gigantic evil and national dishonour.” In fact, in the same year, a House of Commons Committee sat to take evidence and reported to the effect that adulteration was widely prevalent, the public health endangered, fraud committed on the whole community, public morality tainted and the high commercial character of the country seriously lowered. Nevertheless, five years were allowed to lapse before the first adulteration Act reached the statute‐book in 1860. This was a weak and inefficient measure and was found to be useless. Very few prosecutions, if any, were instituted. Twelve years later, in 1872, an amending Act was passed. The High Court decided that this Act required sellers of food to know whether what they sold was pure or adulterated. Many traders were convicted, with the result that manufacturers and shopkeepers agitated and obtained the appointment of yet another Parliamentary Committee—on whose advice the Sale of Food and Drugs Act, 1875, was passed. This Act, which had the exceptionally long life of more than fifty years, contained many protective provisions for dealers in food, which, although to some extent no more than fair, did operate in such a way as to limit severely the efforts of local authorities to protect the public. One of the recommendations made in The Lancet has never yet been adopted by Parliament in relation to the sale of adulterated food—namely, that the names and addresses of all vendors of samples found unsatisfactory should be systematically published. Another recommendation was not adopted until the first Labelling of Food Order was made seventy years later, in 1944, requiring the disclosure on many packed foods of their composition.

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British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Gary P. Radford, Marie L. Radford and Mark Alpert

– The purpose of this paper is to use the work of philosopher Slavoj Žižek to gain insights into representations of the librarian and the library in contemporary popular culture.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the work of philosopher Slavoj Žižek to gain insights into representations of the librarian and the library in contemporary popular culture.

Design/methodology/approach

A psycho-analytic reading of the comic book series Rex Libris using Slavoj Žižek’s treatment of Jacques Lacan.

Findings

Žižek’s approach can provide novel and previously unconsidered insights into the understanding of librarian stereotypes in particular and representations of the library in general.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to the representations of the librarian and the library in one comic book series. Its findings need to be generalized to representations in other forms of popular culture.

Originality/value

As far as the authors know, this is the only paper that has applied the work of Žižek in the library and information science (LIS) literature. As such, not only are the insights into the representations of librarians and libraries important, this paper also acts as a valuable introduction to the work of Žižek for the LIS community of scholars.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Abstract

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Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of Business Cycles
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-838-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Danica Ognjenovic

Wood Green “Shopping City” is hardly the most attractive development Europe has ever seen — the heavy, red‐brick, municipal feel of the place doesn't merit the warm and…

Abstract

Wood Green “Shopping City” is hardly the most attractive development Europe has ever seen — the heavy, red‐brick, municipal feel of the place doesn't merit the warm and exciting catch‐phrases which the publicists have dreamed up for it. However, as an integrated urban development it figured prominently in the International Council of Shopping Centres' 5th Annual European Conference, where it was used as a case study for a panel session. As far as general information goes, there are still 14 units on the market, and standard shops are letting for between £20,000‐£30,000 in Phase II. The centre is mainly for comparison shopping, although there is a bid to increase food representation in certain areas, and there are restaurant facilities within the development itself. Wood Green was designed to be a major focus for shopping in North London and to cater for a projected catchment area of some 3–4 million people. The last attendance figures available for the “Shopping City” (which were taken in late April when a number of shops now open were not trading) show Saturday to be the peak day, when a total of 50,000 people used the centre. Phase I was started in 1973, and sits on the east side of Wood Green high road. Phase II, on the west side, began construction in 1976, and the major stores of D H Evans and C&A are trading now. Phases I and II are linked by a bridge across the high street at first floor level. Called the Gallery, units on this bridge will be leased to specialist up‐market shops, and this area is singled out for high pedestrian flow. What distinguishes Wood Green is the major housing development on the upper levels of Shopping City. This is due for completion in 1981 and will provide 201 flats for over 500 people. The dwellings are for one, two or five persons, and overlook a central landscaped court, inside which is a children's creche. In February 1979 a Market Hall was opened which gives 54,000 sq ft to 72 traders, many of whom have installed themselves there now that their old sites have been replaced by Shopping City. Another feature which has been made much of by the developers is Citysquare, “a place where shoppers and advertisers will meet.” A metal frame has been suspended from the ceiling of Citysquare and it is planned to take in “advertising, news and entertainment facilities with dramatic sound and vision.” Below this structure, it is hoped that national and local advertisers will put on show their products and services. It must also be noted that there is provision for 1,500 car parking spaces, and 25,000 sq ft of offices. It is also felt that because the car park is located directly over the shopping centre, it encourages pedestrian flow through the first floor level of the development. The other way in which customer circulation is encouraged is via the Gallery across the high road and because there are main traders at each end, on both floors. The development is a joint enterprise between the Haringey Council and Electricity Supply Nominees Ltd, builders are John Laing Ltd, architects are Sheppard Robson, and Development Consultants, Letting and managing agents are Richard Ellis, London. The following report outlines major areas of interest discussed at the conference. The panel speakers were: Richard Young of Sheppard Robson, London, who were the architects for Wood Green; Nigel Woolner of Chapman Taylor Associates, who have Eldon Square in their portfolio and who are involved in the West One development in Oxford Street; Rex Mercer of Drivers Jonas, which acted on behalf of the London Borough of Haringey for the Wood Green development; and Derek Nunn of Bungey, Nunn & Stock, marketing advisers, who also contributed to Wood Green. Roger Lucas of Richard Ellis chaired the panel.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2018

David R. Bewley-Taylor and Marie Nougier

This chapter analyses major issues surrounding the Annual Report Questionnaire (ARQ) – the key mechanism through which the UN collects data on various facets of the…

Abstract

This chapter analyses major issues surrounding the Annual Report Questionnaire (ARQ) – the key mechanism through which the UN collects data on various facets of the world’s illicit drug market. As the ARQ is currently under review by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), the authors suggest ways to incorporate the gains made at the United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the World Drug Problem.

The UNGASS Outcome Document has, to certain degree, enabled the international community to move away from the simplistic goals of a drug-free world enshrined in the 2009 Political Declaration and towards a more comprehensive health- and human rights-based approach. The UNGASS has also laid important groundwork for the 2019 Ministerial Segment, where member states will delineate the global drug control approach for the next decade. In this context, the issue of metrics and indicators has a critical political role to play as it will shape how member states will measure progress against their international drug control commitments.

Starting with a review of the ‘triple trouble’ – poor data quality, low response rates from Member States and other inconsistencies that have long persisted with the ARQ – the chapter moves on to offer substantive critiques on the content of the Questionnaire and ways to better incorporate issues related to health, human rights and development. The chapter concludes by providing guidance on possible synergies with the Outcome Document and the Sustainable Development Goals, bringing international drug control in line with the UN Charter.

Details

Collapse of the Global Order on Drugs: From UNGASS 2016 to Review 2019
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-488-6

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Atif Awad and Abdalla Sirag

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the presence of the Dutch disease hypothesis through examining the remittance-growth nexus using annual data for Sudan covering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the presence of the Dutch disease hypothesis through examining the remittance-growth nexus using annual data for Sudan covering the period 1977-2015. The paper seeks to answer the following critical questions: what is the impact of remittance on Sudanese economy? How exchange rate influences the impact of remittance on growth? To what extent the impact of remittance on growth differs between the short and long run.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the autoregressive distributive lag (ARDL) technique because of its several advantages.

Findings

The ARDL results show evidence against the existence of such a hypothesis. More specifically, the results show that over time, due to the structured nature of the economy, remittances may affect economic growth negatively through several mechanisms including the depreciation rather than the appreciation of the exchange rate.

Originality/value

After 2011 and the secession of South Sudan, Sudan lost more than 80 per cent of foreign exchange revenues which reflected in the sharp gap between the official rate and the parallel exchange rate equal to 150 per cent. To lessening this gap, the attention was given to expatriates to encourage them to transfer their remittances through official channels. Since remittance and exchange rate mechanism may affect growth positively or negatively, no study addressed this possibility. This is the first empirical study in this matter that considers both the temporary and the permanent impacts.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Mohammad Tanvi Newaz, Marcus Jefferies, Peter Rex Davis and Manikam Pillay

Despite many studies that aim to argue, develop and position the concept of psychological contracts, few have explored how a psychological contract may be applied to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite many studies that aim to argue, develop and position the concept of psychological contracts, few have explored how a psychological contract may be applied to safety in the construction industry. A psychological contract of safety (PCS) describes an individual's conceptualized belief that relates to mutual safety obligations, drawn from explicit or implicit promises of associated workers or its supervisor. This study investigates safety practices on construction sites through the lens of the widely applied and researched psychological contract theory emanating from a business paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The process of validating a PCS scale within the construction industry required the collection of data from a mega-construction project in Sydney, Australia. A quantitative methodology was used to collect data from 352 construction workers through a survey instrument designed to reveal their perception of procedures, policies and practices. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to ensure data reliability and data validity of the survey findings together with goodness of fit of PCS model.

Findings

The findings showed the presence of a PCS in a construction safety setting examined. A two-factor model underlying aspects, namely employer and employee obligations was recommended since the four-factor model, including relational and transactional components of both parties' safety obligations, could not be validated due to the discriminant validity associated with the particular constructs.

Originality/value

Conceptualizing the extant PC theory as a framework from which to leverage safety management initiatives brings a new approach to construction safety studies, revealing the influential role of supervisors in interpreting safety practices. The research aimed to identify safety obligations, which are influential in the development of PSC scale, further the research provides an explanation as to how a PCS may be contextualized in the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2015

Gerry Rayner and Peter Corkill

Partnerships between universities and secondary schools are highly valued for a range of pedagogical, transition and outreach benefits to students, teachers and more…

Abstract

Partnerships between universities and secondary schools are highly valued for a range of pedagogical, transition and outreach benefits to students, teachers and more broadly, society. Teachers in schools provide a rich insight into how university teaching staff can better engage students and provide them with deeper learning experiences. Universities can provide on-campus student incursions for learning activities, work experience opportunities, research projects with academics and lectures by specialist researchers. This chapter describes the range of benefits arising from a partnership, established in 2009, between the John Monash Science School (JMSS) and Monash University, co-located in outer suburban of Melbourne, Australia. The JMSS–Monash partnership has generated a number of innovative and dynamic educational programmes, which have positively impacted the learning and engagement of students across geographic divides. The partnership is rich, and has broadened and deepened as the partners have learned more about each other’s capacities, and envisioned what is possible in an educational landscape bereft of innovation and challenge to existing norms. By thinking creatively and acting bravely, the partners have shone a light on a brighter future in science for Australian students.

Details

University Partnerships for Community and School System Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-132-3

1 – 10 of 205