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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai, Ragini Chauhan, Gargi Baranwal and Divya Srivastava

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses of a sample of 176 private bank employees in India were used to examine the proposed mediated model.

Findings

The variable rewards and recognition is found to be significantly correlated to both employee engagement and normative commitment. Results of regression have been analyzed in line with the four conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986). Further, SPSS macro developed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) is used to test the proposed mediation model. The relationship between rewards and recognition and normative commitment is found to become smaller after controlling the variable employee engagement. The results provide partial support to the mediation hypothesis.

Originality/value

Normative commitment has been less researched relative to the attention paid to affective commitment. Further, no research has yet focused on the impact of rewards and recognition on normative commitment, with the mediating impact of employee engagement. This study hence provides the first empirical test of the established relationship between rewards and recognition and employee engagement by introducing normative commitment as an outcome variable.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Alka Rai, Piyali Ghosh, Ragini Chauhan and Richa Singh

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales…

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2871

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales associates, with an underlying mediating role of employee engagement in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted across 35 retail stores in five cities located in North India on 247 sales associates. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the mediation hypotheses. Analysis was done in lines with the conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986).

Findings

Employee engagement is found to fully mediate the impact of rewards and recognition on in-role and extra-role performances.

Practical implications

Organizations should be committed to recognizing employees’ efforts and providing them with financial and non-financial rewards based on organizational policies. Such measures would improve in-role and extra-role performances through enhancing engagement level of employees.

Originality/value

This study makes significant contributions to literature on employee engagement and that on retail sector, especially in Indian context, through highlighting the mediating role of engagement. Given shortage and retention of skilled manpower as major challenges for Indian retailers, engaging sales associates through rewards and recognition to improve their performance at both in-role and extra-role levels can have significant implications for retailers.

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The Ten Commandments of Lean Six Sigma
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-690-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Patricia Milne

The purpose of this paper, drawing as it does on earlier research, is to provide the context for a discussion on the use of rewards and recognition programmes in knowledge

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56179

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, drawing as it does on earlier research, is to provide the context for a discussion on the use of rewards and recognition programmes in knowledge aware organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows that knowledge sharing is the fundamental requirement of a knowledge‐based organisation. Some of the greatest challenges for organisations moving down the knowledge management path stem from well‐established practices of hoarding knowledge, practices which, in the past, have been well rewarded. Employees' motivation was to hoard knowledge because of the competitive advantage that this would give them. The challenge now is to develop an organisational culture where sharing knowledge is the norm. In seeking ways to foster this culture managers are implementing incentive programmes in the belief that employees will be motivated to share their knowledge across the organisation. Some organisations are investing large amounts of organisational resources towards this end. This paper uses the results of the earlier research to provide a context for an examination of the use of rewards and recognition programmes in the knowledge aware organisation.

Findings

The paper finds that reward and recognition programmes can positively affect motivation, performance and interest within an organisation. While a little more problematic, team‐based incentives, if designed appropriately, can also encourage and support a range of positive outcomes. But research has yet to reveal whether programmes of this type will influence employees to share their knowledge and learning. Neither is there any research‐based evidence to show that these activities do provide the expected or hoped for return on the, sometimes, large amounts of money that organisations invest in them.

Research limitations/implications

While there is a strong history of research into the impact of rewards on aspects of employee behaviour including motivation and performance, no research to date has investigated the impact on knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that managers who are relying on rewards and recognition programmes as part of their strategies for cultural change need to support research programmes so that they can be confident that the large amounts of resources they are investing for this purpose will bring the return they think.

Originality/value

This paper provides the context for a discussion. It shows that while organisations are investing in reward and recognition programmes, research on the value of such programmes as factors that motivate knowledge sharing has not been explored empirically.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Derek Gryna

Explores the concept of developing an organizational reward and recognition process for superior customer service. Discusses organizational goals in the light of ensuring…

Abstract

Explores the concept of developing an organizational reward and recognition process for superior customer service. Discusses organizational goals in the light of ensuring the reward recognition programme is directing the department the right way; of ensuring that words and actions are not contradictory; and directing people towards common goals. Outlines management support, highlighting customer focus, quality, teamwork, training and communication networks. Suggests that even if the return on other investments is minimal, employee satisfaction will be greatly improved.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Steve Macaulay and Sarah Cook

Explores the role of reward and recognition schemes in motivating groups and individuals to keep their energies focused on the customer. Examines the practical steps…

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6887

Abstract

Explores the role of reward and recognition schemes in motivating groups and individuals to keep their energies focused on the customer. Examines the practical steps necessary to introduce and maintain successful initiatives, both financial and non‐financial. These steps involve taking time to clarify the aims of the scheme and ensuring there is a good “fit” through taking full account of the organisational and customer context. Stresses the need to measure the right things and emphasises the importance of buy in through involvement of employees and customers, plus linking rewards to customer satisfaction and taking account of the needs of internal customers. Concludes with a checklist to enable readers to assess their reward and recognition processes and pinpoint areas which need attention in order to give more customer focus. Short company examples are given throughout to illustrate key points.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Calvin London and Kim Higgot

Reward and recognition systems for individual employees remain one of the controversial areas of quality management. Previous discussions on this aspect of quality…

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18568

Abstract

Reward and recognition systems for individual employees remain one of the controversial areas of quality management. Previous discussions on this aspect of quality management, although recognizing their importance, often attribute failure of the system to the method of implementation. This company has made several attempts to develop a process of employee reward and recognition with little success and the various systems lost their prestige among employees. Through the company’s quality committee a new process for employee reward and recognition based on an unbiased assessment by managers, fellow employees and internal customers has been developed. Describes the reward and recognition process developed by the company, including a description of the categories used in the process, overviews of the process in place for acceptance and review of nominations and descriptions of the recognition for awards.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Ron Cacioppe

Discusses the value of team and individual reward strategies and how these can be used to contribute to organisational change and success. A review of team effectiveness…

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23580

Abstract

Discusses the value of team and individual reward strategies and how these can be used to contribute to organisational change and success. A review of team effectiveness and models of teamwork are first discussed so that team rewards are understood as important motivators to accomplishing organisational objectives. Four factors need to be considered in establishing team‐based rewards: the stages of a team life cycle, reward and recognition categories, the type of teams and the culture of the team and organisation. Forty‐four specific reward tools are described which can be used for individual or team incentives. Comprehensive matrices are put forward which can be used to determine which tool should be used at which stage in a team’s life cycle and with which type of team. Finally, the implementation cost, evaluation of team reward systems is considered.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Jo En Yap, Liliana L. Bove and Michael B. Beverland

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of different reward programs on in‐role and extra‐role behaviour; and to investigate whether specific reward programs…

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5470

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of different reward programs on in‐role and extra‐role behaviour; and to investigate whether specific reward programs can be designed to enhance both in‐role and extra‐role behaviour simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured in‐depth interviews were conducted on a total of 11 employees from four different fashion retail outlets. Informants consisted of employees from different positions within these organizations (i.e. store manager, assistant store manager and sales associates) to provide researchers with possibly differing viewpoints. Interviews were content analysed and classified, according to emerging themes.

Findings

Certain reward programs, namely individual and group financial incentives motivated sales associates to engage in both in‐role and extra‐role behaviour simultaneously. Further, compared to formal recognition programs, informal reward programs (individual financial incentives, individual social recognition and group social recognition) appeared to be more effective in motivating sales associates to enhance their in‐role and extra‐role performance.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a better understanding of the effects of different reward programs and their administration on in‐role and extra‐role performance of retail sales associates.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Susan Kuczmarski and Thomas Kuczmarski

The purpose of our research is to explore how rewards serve to fuel a collaborative culture, energize and motivate team members and nurture innovation.

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564

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of our research is to explore how rewards serve to fuel a collaborative culture, energize and motivate team members and nurture innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 in-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with executives – high-tech, low-tech and no-tech.

Findings

The following findings emerged from the field research: rewards can be both financial, such as bonuses and incentives, and non-financial, such as extra vacations or other gifts. Huge internal personal benefits accrue from setting up a reward structure, including increased pride, peer recognition, higher self-confidence, greater job satisfaction and enhanced self-accomplishment. When we recognize others, it can impact an individual's self-worth on a profound level. It is described as feedback that sinks into the core.

Originality/value

Three milestones have been outlined throughout the innovation process where opportunities for recognition can exist: upon recognizing insights for identifying a problem, after understanding and overcoming difficulties encountered during creative solution generation and when recognizing and activating the benefits accrued from pinpointing solutions to the problem.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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