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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Revti Raman Sharma, Doren Chadee and Banjo Roxas

This study argues that knowledge management (KM) by itself has only limited effects on client–vendor relationship (CVR) of global providers of highly customised services…

Abstract

Purpose

This study argues that knowledge management (KM) by itself has only limited effects on client–vendor relationship (CVR) of global providers of highly customised services. Rather, it is the ability of top management to properly evaluate and utilise a vast array of complex knowledge which allows global firms to develop and maintain superior CVR. The paper tests the proposition that global mindset (GM) of top management mediates the effects of KM on CVR quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses survey data from a sample of 68 international service providers (ISPs) in the information technology sector in India and partial least squares approach to structural equation modelling to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that both KM and GM have positive and statistically significant effects on the quality of CVRs. The results also confirm that the GM of top management has significant and substantive mediation effects on the relationship between KM and CVR quality.

Research limitations/implications

The small size of the sample and the focus on ISPs in a single country constitute the main limitations of the study. Future research should ideally draw from a larger sample of ISPs from multiple countries and sectors in order to allow for greater generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

ISPs will benefit from developing the GM of their top management teams to enhance their CVRs.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insights into how, in an international context, firms can transform their KM into superior CVR quality through the development of GM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Gloria Sraha, Revti Raman Sharma, Dave Crick and James M. Crick

This study aims to contribute to the existing understanding of export practices in sub-Saharan African firms with a contextual focus on Ghanaian exporters operating in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the existing understanding of export practices in sub-Saharan African firms with a contextual focus on Ghanaian exporters operating in business-to-business (B2B) markets. Underpinned by resource-based theory and its association with the relational view, it examines how the interplay between various decision makers’ international experience, export commitment and distribution adaptation decisions influence firms’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a mixed methods approach, using survey data from 116 internationalising Ghanaian businesses across three sectors, supplemented with qualitative insights from 18 follow-up interviews.

Findings

The study establishes a full mediation effect of export commitment on the association between international experience and export performance; also, the moderating effect of distribution adaptation on export commitment – performance relationships. Unique insights are provided into the perceived role of trustworthy, intermediaries as “stakeholders” that add to a respective firm’s resource base; that is, in building capabilities in overseas markets and informing evolving business model decisions to overcome potential export barriers.

Originality/value

The insights from sub-Saharan African firms provide contextual value given the relatively under-represented existing research from the region. Original insights highlight ways in which decision makers build capabilities and that they do not always follow a forward moving internationalisation process, so use different measures of performance regarding B2B product-market ventures over time.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Revti Raman Sharma, Gloria Sraha and Dave Crick

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of foreign market attractiveness on the association between export promotion programmes (EPPs) and export…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of foreign market attractiveness on the association between export promotion programmes (EPPs) and export performance in the context of Ghanaian firms. In addition to understanding how EPPs help enhance the attractiveness of the foreign markets and thus export performance, the study contributes to the under-developed export performance literature regarding Sub-Saharan African (SSA) firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method approach is utilised. In the first instance quantitative analysis is undertaken on 116 Ghanaian firms via data collected using the drop and pick method. Qualitative data involving interviews with 18 managers of exporting firms are then reported upon.

Findings

The study finds full mediation effects for foreign market attractiveness. This suggests that EPPs can enhance export performance via the intervening variable of foreign market attractiveness. Specifically, EPPs should be considered as a resource in managers’ ability to develop capabilities in exporting, but need to be considered in the context of other intervening factors such as perceived foreign market attractiveness.

Originality/value

The literature regarding EPPs and export performance mostly overlook any link between EPPs and other determinants of export performance towards establishing an indirect relationship between the constructs. The study fills this important gap; in particular, in respect of SSA firms and specifically in the context of Ghana.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Revti Raman Sharma, Val Lindsay and Nikki Everton

Most of the research on international outsourcing of value chain activities focuses on larger firms. The purpose of this paper is to fill an important research gap by…

Abstract

Purpose

Most of the research on international outsourcing of value chain activities focuses on larger firms. The purpose of this paper is to fill an important research gap by exploring how small firms manage institutional differences to enhance their international outsourcing success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data from interviews conducted with two managers of a small New Zealand apparel manufacturing firm who have over 35 years of combined experience with international outsourcing. The firm had both failed and successful experiences in its international outsourcing ventures. Findings are discussed in the context of the extant literature on international outsourcing.

Findings

Small firms overcome institutional constraints they face in offshore locations by leveraging from their entrepreneurial skills, learning from failures and using a relational governance mode. This results in achieving performance targets and sustaining long-term relationships with suppliers, defined as international outsourcing success in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may not be generalised as they are based on a single case and cover only the client perspective. The study contributes to the offshoring literature from the perspective of smaller firms and calls for quantitative investigations to generalise the findings.

Practical implications

The key implications include that small firms need to develop quality relationships and leverage from their unique entrepreneurial capabilities to enhance their success while outsourcing to relatively different institutional environments. Moreover, even a failed experience might help generate subsequent multiple successful ventures, if lessons are learned and behaviour adapted accordingly. Operating in emerging economies is much more challenging than managers from developed markets usually expect – thus the need for them to understand and prepare well before undertaking operations in these markets.

Originality/value

With the rise of international outsourcing of value chain activities, the findings are useful to small firms aiming to achieve success in their outsourcing ventures in offshore locations. This study is one of only a few studies investigating small firms’ international outsourcing that examines both failure and success in an institutionally diverse context.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Yang Yu and Revti Raman Sharma

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of high-status local exchange partners on foreign firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of high-status local exchange partners on foreign firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Bridging status research and international business literature, the study develops a framework that describes three prominent effects of high-status partners on foreign firms, and further links these effects to firms’ relationship outcomes. The proposed conceptual model is examined using partial least squares structural equations modeling on a sample of 96 foreign firms operating in China.

Findings

The study provides evidence that high-status local exchange partners tend to seek higher relationship-specific investment from foreign firms, and in the meantime, provide firms with greater opportunities for local learning and networking; subsequently, foreign firms are more likely to achieve satisfactory outcomes in the relationships.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that affiliation with high-status local actors can be a key approach to overcome the liability of foreignness in a host country. Firms therefore, should treat them carefully as an important category of exchange partner portfolios. These are particularly relevant to foreign firms competing in China, a society characterized by strong hierarchies.

Originality/value

The study serves as a preliminary attempt to introduce status concept to the field of international business. It promotes status as a key criterion for local partner selection, and offers the status research a contextual insight in the dilemma of choosing high- vs low-status partner candidates.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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