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1 – 10 of over 151000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ian Cunningham and Philip James

Notes that the present human resource literature on absence pays relatively little attention to the management of genuine injury and illness. Seeks to partially address…

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Abstract

Notes that the present human resource literature on absence pays relatively little attention to the management of genuine injury and illness. Seeks to partially address this lacuna in the literature through the findings of an exploratory study of the arrangements used to facilitate the return to work of ill and injured employees in 77 organisations. Finds that larger organisations and those which recognised trade unions offered the most extensive range of assistance to workers. Also finds the presence of return to work policies to be associated with favourable trends in absence. Suggests that the impact of return to work activities on absence merits further study and goes on to identify issues that should be addressed in future research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Karina Nielsen and Jo Yarker

Sustainable return to work remains challenging for workers returning after long-term sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMDs): stress, anxiety and depression…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable return to work remains challenging for workers returning after long-term sick leave due to common mental disorders (CMDs): stress, anxiety and depression. Line managers play a significant role in supporting returned workers. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the supportive behaviors of line managers in supporting returned workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal study with up to three semi-structured interviews with 20 line managers with experience managing returned workers. In these interviews, the authors asked questions about the supportive behaviors line managers enacted to support workers and the role of the context. The authors conducted reflexive thematic analysis.

Findings

The analyses revealed five key strategies, including managing workload, flexible working time arrangements, location of work, mental health check-ups and long-term support. The interviewed line managers reported their own lived experiences and that being aware of the limitations of their role, together with training and support from senior management and human resources (HR), enabled them to provide appropriate support.

Practical implications

The five strategies and the barriers and facilitators to implementing these may enable HR to develop policies and procedures to support line managers, including training of line managers.

Originality/value

This is the first study in the UK on line managers’ behaviors to support workers who have returned to work after a period of long-term sickness absence due to CMDs. The identification of such behaviors is paramount to developing organizational policies and practices. The question, however, remains whether employees see these behaviors as effective.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2023

Joseph G. Altonji, John Eric Humphries and Ling Zhong

This chapter uses a college-by-graduate degree fixed effects estimator to evaluate the returns to 19 different graduate degrees for men and women. We find substantial…

Abstract

This chapter uses a college-by-graduate degree fixed effects estimator to evaluate the returns to 19 different graduate degrees for men and women. We find substantial variation across degrees, and evidence that OLS overestimates the returns to degrees with the highest average earnings and underestimates the returns to degrees with the lowest average earnings. Second, we decompose the impacts on earnings into effects on wage rates and effects on hours. For most degrees, the earnings gains come from increased wage rates, though hours play an important role in some degrees, such as medicine, especially for women. Third, we estimate the net present value and internal rate of return for each degree, which account for the time and monetary costs of degrees. Finally, we provide descriptive evidence that satisfaction gains are large for some degrees with smaller economic returns, such as education and humanities degrees, especially for men.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Jenny Lunt, Sally Hemming, James Elander, Amy Baraniak, Kim Burton and Destiny Ellington

The prevalence and multi-system nature of post-COVID-19 symptoms warrants clearer understanding of their work ability implications within the working age population. An…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence and multi-system nature of post-COVID-19 symptoms warrants clearer understanding of their work ability implications within the working age population. An exploratory survey was undertaken to provide empirical evidence of the work-relevant experiences of workers recovering from COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A bespoke online survey based on a biopsychosocial framework ran between December 2020 and February 2021. It collected quantitative ratings of work ability and return-to-work status, qualitative responses about return-to-work experiences, obstacles and recommendations, along with views on employer benefits for making accommodations. A sample of 145 UK workers recovering from COVID-19 was recruited via social media, professional networks and industry contacts. Qualitative data was subject to thematic analysis. Participants were mainly from health/social care (50%) and educational settings (14%).

Findings

Just over 90% indicated that they had experienced at least some post-COVID-19 symptoms, notably fatigue and cognitive effects. For 55%, symptoms lasted longer than six months. Only 15% had managed a full return-to-work. Of the 88 who provided workability ratings, just 13 and 18% respectively rated their physical and mental workability as good or very good. Difficulties in resuming work were attributed to symptom unpredictability, their interaction with job demands, managing symptoms and demands in parallel, unhelpful attitudes and expectations. Manager and peer support was reported as variable.

Originality/value

Workplace health management characterised by flexible long-term collaborative return-to-work planning, supported by more COVID-centric absence policies and organisational cultures, appear pivotal for sustaining the return-to-work of the large segments of the global workforce affected by post-COVID-19 symptoms.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Joanna Bohatko-Naismith, Carole James, Maya Guest, Darren Anthony Rivett and Samantha Ashby

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the injured worker’s perspective of experiences with their workplace return to work coordinator (RTWC), and explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the injured worker’s perspective of experiences with their workplace return to work coordinator (RTWC), and explore some of the barriers they encountered in the return to work process.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten injured workers from New South Wales, Australia. The thematic analysis of transcripts was completed.

Findings

The findings provide an insight into the experiences of injured workers and their relationship with RTWCs. Five key themes emerged from the data: return to work experiences and the RTWC role, high turnover and lack of consistency in the role, RTWC “ideal”, knowledge and skills, communication skills and the RTWC role and GP visits privacy and conflict of interest with peer RTWCs.

Practical implications

The role of the workplace RTWC in the return to work process for injured workers is important and these findings are highly relevant to the return to work sector. Consistency within the role at the workplace and careful consideration of the specific traits and characteristics required by an individual to perform the role need to be observed during the selection process by employers when appointing a workplace RTWC to assist injured workers return to work.

Originality/value

This is the first Australian study to examine the injured workers views and experiences with the workplace RTWC and other factors that shape the return to work process.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

C. Gail Hepburn, Renée‐Louise Franche and Lori Francis

Consistent with previous research, the purpose of this paper is to propose that the presence of workplace‐based returntowork strategies would reduce the duration of work

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Abstract

Purpose

Consistent with previous research, the purpose of this paper is to propose that the presence of workplace‐based returntowork strategies would reduce the duration of work disability. Moving beyond existing research, the paper further seeks to propose that these strategies would also enhance mental health and affective commitment among injured workers. In addition, the paper aims to introduce interactional justice – injured workers' perceptions of the interpersonal and informational fairness of the person most responsible for their returntowork process – to the returntowork context, and to hypothesize that these factors would also contribute to the explanation of these outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Within five weeks of their injury, telephone interviews were conducted with 166 workers from the province of Ontario, Canada, who had experienced musculoskeletal lost‐time workplace injuries.

Findings

Multiple regression analyses indicate that certain workplace‐based strategies were associated with days on compensation, self‐reported days absent, and depressive symptoms, but not affective commitment. Further, as hypothesized, interactional justice accounted for additional variance explained in self‐reported days absent, depressive symptoms, and affective commitment. Interactional justice did not explain additional variance in days on compensation.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for employers engaged in returntowork practices and researchers studying return to work. Both should address not only the workplace‐based strategies used, but also the way in which these strategies are implemented.

Originality/value

The paper replicates previous empirical work on returntowork interventions and demonstrates the importance of the presence of workplace‐based strategies in explaining the duration of work disability.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

1126

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

J.R. Carby‐Hall

Modern employment legislation invests the employee with important rights resulting in a greater degree of job security and improved legal protection in his employment…

Abstract

Modern employment legislation invests the employee with important rights resulting in a greater degree of job security and improved legal protection in his employment. These rights or entitlements which are all personal in nature are divisible, for the sake of convenience, into four parts. Firstly, individual rights. These include guarantee payments, medical suspension, maternity, time off for specified activities, and the employer's insolvency. These rights are by no means exhaustive. Other rights of an individual nature as for example the right not to belong to a trade union where a closed shop is in operation; rights in connection with trade union membership; written reasons for dismissal; and so on, will be treated in the context of the discussion which will take place under the appropriate heading. Secondly, it is proposed to examine the employees right not to be discriminated against in employment on grounds of race and sex, thirdly, his right not to be unfairly dismissed will be analysed, to be followed finally by his right to redundancy payments. In this monograph, it is proposed to examine the first of these personal rights, namely the employee's individual rights. Each of the others will be discussed in subsequent monographs. It should be noted that unlike the common law terms implied into the contract of employment which consist of duties imposed on both the employer and the employee and which can be contracted out of by an express term in the contact of employment the statutory conditions of employment cannot be dispensed with in that manner. Like the implied terms at common law, the statutory conditions of employment too form another source of contract of employment though of course they are independent in that they neither form part of the contract of employment nor of the common law rights.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Abstract

The changes in women’s and men’s work lives have been considerable in recent decades. Yet much of the recent research on gender differences in employment and earnings has been of a more snapshot nature rather than taking a longer comparative look at evolving patterns. In this paper, we use 50 years (1964–2013) of US Census Annual Demographic Files (March Current Population Survey) to track the changing returns to human capital (measured as both educational attainment and potential work experience), estimating comparable earnings equations by gender at each point in time. We consider the effects of sample selection over time for both women and men and show the rising effect of selection for women in recent years. Returns to education diverge for women and men over this period in the selection-adjusted results but converge in the OLS results, while returns to potential experience converge in both sets of results. We also create annual calculations of synthetic lifetime labor force participation, hours, and earnings that indicate convergence by gender in worklife patterns, but less convergence in recent years in lifetime earnings. Thus, while some convergence has indeed occurred, the underlying mechanisms causing convergence differ for women and men, reflecting continued fundamental differences in women’s and men’s life experiences.

Details

Gender Convergence in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-456-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

The purpose of this study is to examine processes in the relationship between WFP and work-family conflict in addition to work related attitudes of women returning to work

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine processes in the relationship between WFP and work-family conflict in addition to work related attitudes of women returning to work after maternity leave who hold management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is gathered from the responses of 238 female managers working for companies throughout Italy who have recently returned to work after maternity leave, to a self-report questionnaire.

Findings

The results show that the availability of WFP is directly or indirectly related to work attitudes among female managers. Work-family conflict is shown to partially mediate the relationship between the availability of WFPs and work engagement and the availability of WFPs moderates the relationship between work engagement and work-family conflict.

Practical implications

Therefore provision of communication and psychological support and flexible time-management policies would provide the organizational structure to produce a healthy work-life balance.

Originality/value

This paper has an original approach by examining the psychological mechanisms underlying the availability WFP on attitudes of women managers returning to work after maternity leave.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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