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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Damien Hallegatte, Myriam Ertz and François Marticotte

Retro branding is gaining unprecedented momentum. This study aims to empirically examine the moderating impact of nostalgia proneness on the relationship between retro

Abstract

Purpose

Retro branding is gaining unprecedented momentum. This study aims to empirically examine the moderating impact of nostalgia proneness on the relationship between retro branding and consumer behavioral intentions in the music industry. Nostalgia and retro branding are two paramount elements conceptually discussed in literature but rarely investigated together empirically despite their interconnections.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment including four different scenarios blending retro and contemporary stimuli was conducted on 181 subjects. Two rock band variables were manipulated: song set list (i.e. list of songs) and band lineup.

Findings

The findings suggest that mixing the past and present for a retro brand impacts consumer behavior. A more nuanced explanation is suggested by showing that a retro brand has a strong effect on consumers’ intentions to attend and willingness to pay, but not on their WOM intentions, when these consumers are more prone to feeling nostalgia.

Originality/value

Nostalgia and retro branding appear to be interconnected concepts, but few studies have assessed how nostalgia proneness can impact consumers’ intentions toward a retro brand. Fewer have investigated consumers’ intentions toward an experiential, intangible retro brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Elisabetta Merlo and Mario Perugini

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the contribution that history can give to marketing strategies aimed at revitalizing fashion brands. It focuses on the…

2383

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the contribution that history can give to marketing strategies aimed at revitalizing fashion brands. It focuses on the revival strategy implemented in recent years by the Pucci fashion company.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is carried out in four parts. Marketing literature dealing with “brand revival” is reviewed in the first part. The second and the third part deal with the main characteristics featured, respectively, by the original and restored Palio and Vivara collections. In the fourth part, by applying the key concepts provided to us by the marketing literature, we pinpoint the chief values which Pucci’s retro-marketing strategy has emphasized upon and those that instead have been partially, if not completely, neglected. The research is based on a mix of sources including records kept by historical archives, fashion press, economic and financial databases and exhibition catalogues.

Findings

The research shows that resorting to the past to revitalize a fashion brand can backfire if the retro-marketing strategy is not supported by an extensive knowledge of the firm’s history, and by a well documented analysis of the historical background in which the brand was originally introduced.

Originality/value

The paper provides an example of interdisciplinary approach to brand revival, a marketing strategy to which an increasing number of firms resort to meet the consumers’ call for nostalgic innovation.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2019

Olzhas Taniyev and Brian S. Gordon

The purpose of this paper exploratory study is to decipher sport consumer associations and sentiments connected to the brand image of retired athletes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper exploratory study is to decipher sport consumer associations and sentiments connected to the brand image of retired athletes.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 14 sport consumers, who demonstrated an in-depth knowledge of throwback branding tactics and expertise in athlete brand promotion, participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The findings indicate there are three prevalent themes across the present data (i.e. epoch epitome, athlete-team connection and off-the-field persona).

Originality/value

While the proliferation of throwback merchandise and affinity for brands of retired athletes is evident, the internalization of associations related to retired athletes has escaped empirical investigation. Numerous questions concerning how specific facets of a retired athlete’s image (e.g. athletic skills or life off the field) activate nostalgic feelings, drive consumer loyalty and establish market permanence remain unanswered. The current study contributes to the understanding of the brand image of the retired athlete and the existing literature concerning athlete branding.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2019

Zach Scola and Brian S. Gordon

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding of retro marketing in sport through the perspective of sport marketers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand our understanding of retro marketing in sport through the perspective of sport marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

Fourteen sport marketers involved in their team’s marketing and utilized retro participated in topical interviews. Interviews were transcribed and open coded to find themes around how retro marketing is utilized and why the marketers think it may be effective.

Findings

This study discovered prominent themes explaining how retro marketing is implemented (changing marks and jerseys, celebrating anniversaries, milestones and past players and retro nights) and why it may be effective (nostalgia, retro design appeal and connection to the team’s lived history).

Originality/value

Despite the coverage of retro marketing in popular press, little is understood in the academic field. This current study should expand our understanding of retro marketing in sport and be effective in aiding future scholars who investigate retro marketing in sport.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Sylvaine Castellano, Olga Ivanova, Maâlaoui Adnane, Imen Safraou and Francesco Schiavone

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence and existence of retro-industries. The paper proposes using a multidisciplinary approach to define the concept of…

2079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence and existence of retro-industries. The paper proposes using a multidisciplinary approach to define the concept of retro-industries and to identify its specificities.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature reviews in marketing and economics were used to create a model of innovation adoption and diffusion in retro-industries.

Findings

The paper provides theoretical insights about the factors that foster retro-industries such as heritage, tradition, nostalgia and revival. The paper suggests that these factors influence innovations mechanisms and explain the use of the past to manage the challenges of the future.

Originality/value

The paper enriches an identified need to analyse industry from retro perspective; and to identify the factors that foster the emergence of such industries.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Laurence Fort-Rioche and Claire-Lise Ackermann

The purpose of this paper is to examine if “neo-retro”-product design, which is based on the reinterpretation of forms from the past, can paradoxically convey design…

3037

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if “neo-retro”-product design, which is based on the reinterpretation of forms from the past, can paradoxically convey design newness and looks at how such products are perceived by innovators.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted with two groups of respondents, with a total sample of 194 respondents. These were, respectively, submitted to two different product designs for highly technical headphones; one with a neo-retro-design and the other with a typical modern design. The approach enabled the testing and validation of different hypotheses regarding retro and innovation.

Findings

The results suggest that a neo-retro-product design conveys newness and does not mislead the consumer when it comes to evaluating a product's technological input. Furthermore, they support the idea that consumer innovativeness has a positive effect on the attitude towards neo-retro-product design.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore the relationship between neo-retro-design and nostalgia proneness and perceived risk attached to innovative products.

Practical implications

The empirical findings of the paper highlights the creative process hidden behind the neo-retro-product design approach and have implications for design practitioners in the field of innovative products.

Originality/value

Despite the ever-growing importance of the retro-phenomenon, the relationship between neo-retro-product design, perceived innovation and consumer innovativeness has not previously been examined in the literature. The paper contributes to dispelling doubt as regards the compatibility of neo-retro-design and innovativeness.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Mark J. Kay

This paper aims to review the development of branding theory, particularly from the organizational context of building an effective corporate brand.

34656

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the development of branding theory, particularly from the organizational context of building an effective corporate brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the literature on “strong brands” and the experience of several established brands.

Findings

The study finds that no coherent theory defines brand management tasks. Instead, paradigmatic cases of successful brands have come to define branding processes – the logic of the “strong brand” has shaped management branding practices. “Difference” and “consistency” are identified as the primary means of bringing about strong brands, yet these can be difficult to apply, particularly to corporate brands.

Originality/value

A new perspective of the social co‐production of brands as meaningful representations, each with its own logic, is proposed as a managerially useful framework to research and frame brand development tasks. Given the development of anti‐branding attacks, managers need to pay close attention to the new risks of managing corporate brands, and how they tie brands to their corporate social responsibility practices.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Lama Halwani

Scholars have repeatedly concluded that heritage is a significant value driver for luxury brands (Riley et al., 2004; Fionda and Moore, 2009; Wuestefeld et al., 2012;…

1844

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have repeatedly concluded that heritage is a significant value driver for luxury brands (Riley et al., 2004; Fionda and Moore, 2009; Wuestefeld et al., 2012; DeFanti et al., 2014; Ardelet et al., 2015; Dion and Borraz, 2015; Dion and Mazzalovo, 2016). However, little is known on how consumers of different age group make sense of heritage luxury. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers of different age groups make sense of heritage luxury brands (HLBs).

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this, semi-structured, one-on-one, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 consumers of HLBs who fell into one of three age groups: Emerging adults (18 to 25 years), middle-aged adults (33 to 40 years) and older adults (67 to 74 years old).

Findings

The findings of this paper explored the different perceptions of the dimension of heritage in relation to luxury among consumers of different age groups. This paper focuses on the pioneering contributions of Urde, Greyser and Balmer (2007) in defining the dimensions of heritage brands. Although the dimensions of heritage brands defined by Urde et al. (2007) were useful as a starting point, differing perceptions among consumers of different age groups emerged which need to be considered. Findings of this study showed that consumers of all three age groups revealed three characteristics of HLBs. These are timelessness, quality craftsmanship and prestige. The durability and lasting appeal of HLBs was attributed to their high-quality craftsmanship. Quality craftsmanship, recognizability and price contributed to the perceived prestige value of HLBs. It was apparent throughout this study that HLB items helped participants feel connected to others, including their mothers or more remote forebears, their contemporaries and their descendants.

Originality/value

The author aims to understand the interplay between heritage and luxury, to understand how luxury brand consumers of different age groups are influenced by the heritage dimension. The relation between luxury and heritage becomes particularly intriguing when we consider how it affects the perceptions of consumers of different age groups.

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Leonie Lynch, Maurice Patterson and Caoilfhionn Ní Bheacháin

This paper aims to consider the visual literacy mobilized by consumers in their use of brand aesthetics to construct and communicate a curated self.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the visual literacy mobilized by consumers in their use of brand aesthetics to construct and communicate a curated self.

Design/methodology/approach

The research surveyed a range of visual material from Instagram. Specifically, the goal was to use “compositional interpretation”, an approach to visual analysis that is not methodologically explicit but which, in itself, draws upon the visual literacy of the researcher to provide a descriptive analysis of the formal visual quality of images as distinct from their symbolic resonances. The research also incorporates 10 phenomenological-type interviews with consumers. Consistent with a phenomenological approach, informants were selected because they have “lived” the experience under investigation, in this case requiring them to be keen consumers of the Orla Kiely brand.

Findings

Findings indicate that consumers deploy their visual literacy in strategic visualization (imaginatively planning and coordinating artifacts with other objects in their collection, positioning and using them as part of an overall visual repertoire), composition (becoming active producers of images) and emergent design (turning design objects into display pieces, repurposing design objects or simply borrowing brand aesthetics to create designed objects of their own).

Research limitations/implications

This research has implications for the understanding of visual literacy within consumer culture. Engaging comprehensively with the visual compositions of consumers, this research moves beyond brand symbolism, semiotics or concepts of social status to examine the self-conscious creation of a curated self. The achievement of such a curated self depends on visual literacy and the deployment of abstract design language by consumers in the pursuit of both aesthetic satisfaction and social communication.

Practical implications

This research has implications for brand designers and managers in terms of how they might control or manage the use of brand aesthetics by consumers.

Originality/value

To date, there has been very little consumer research that explores the nature of visual literacy and even less that offers an empirical investigation of this concept within the context of brand aesthetics. The research moves beyond brand symbolism, semiotics and social status to consider the deployment of abstract visual language in communicating the curated self.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Anne Rindell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of inputs from consumers' past experiences of a company on their current image‐construction processes, in the…

3859

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of inputs from consumers' past experiences of a company on their current image‐construction processes, in the context of non‐food retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

Research data were collected by a multi‐method combination of several different qualitative research methods from individuals selected by the theoretical sampling procedure. Analysis and interpretation conformed to a classic grounded theory approach.

Findings

It was found that consumer images generated by relevant past experience are a direct and influential input into real‐time corporate image formation. Two new theoretical concepts were identified, “image heritage” and “image‐in‐use”, respectively, distinguishing consumers' past‐based images from those they construct in real time. Image heritage is moderated by three principal variables: timespan of awareness, content of earlier experiences, and key temporal focus.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on the corporate image of non‐food retailers. Future research should broaden the context, to enhance understanding of image heritage and image‐in‐use, and yield useful conceptual generalisations.

Practical implications

Given that the consumer's view of the company's past plays an important role in their interpretation of its present corporate brand, branding strategy should be informed by a systematic effort to identify the probable components of that historical perception.

Originality/value

This study is the first to focus on the influence of the past on consumers' current corporate images. The constructs identified and the terminology novel, offering a radically new dimension to corporate image research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

1 – 10 of 563