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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2018

Dilek G. Yunlu, Hong Ren, Katherine Mohler Fodchuk and Margaret Shaffer

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that examines the influences of expatriate community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model that examines the influences of expatriate community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness and community embeddedness on expatriate retention cognitions. The authors further investigate the moderating role of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 127 expatriates in the USA were collected and analyzed. The authors used multiple (moderator) hierarchical regression analyses to test the hypotheses. In addition, simple slopes analyses were conducted to further understand the interaction effects.

Findings

The results demonstrate that community relationship building behaviors positively influence expatriate community embeddedness, and the latter is associated with stronger retention cognitions. In addition, the paper finds that, for individuals who have lower levels of organizational identification, community embeddedness is particularly important.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on cross-sectional and self-report data, which limits the ability to draw definitive conclusions about causality. Thus, more multi-source and longitudinal data from different expatriate populations would increase the validity and the generalizability of findings. The theory and empirical evidence indicate the importance of community embeddedness, particularly when organizational identification is low, for expatriates’ retention cognitions.

Practical implications

This study examines the important role of community relationship building behaviors on community embeddedness, and the role of community embeddedness in expatriates’ intention to stay.

Originality/value

This paper integrates the unique view of personal resources associated with different social contexts (i.e. community and organizational contexts) in expatriate studies.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Hsi‐Peng Lu and Ming‐Ren Lee

While many studies have focussed on web site stickiness, little is known about the antecedents of blog stickiness such as visit duration and user retention. How…

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Abstract

Purpose

While many studies have focussed on web site stickiness, little is known about the antecedents of blog stickiness such as visit duration and user retention. How demographic differences affect the antecedents of blog stickiness is another research question. Based on social cognitive theory, the IS success model and individual differences theory, this study aims to explore blog quality, the need for cognition, and social influence as the antecedents of blog stickiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The subjects of this study were users who had blog reading experience. The structural equation modelling (SEM) approach was used to evaluate the research model.

Findings

After surveying 231 blog users, the results demonstrate that content is still king in the blog environment. Social influence affects the duration of visits to a blog, but not the retention to the blog. Female readers are mainly interested in content, while males are more interested in system quality and social influence. While blog veterans or heavy users care about content and social influence, blog “newbies” care about context and system quality. Students and non‐students also have different antecedents of blog stickiness.

Originality/value

This study increases understanding of blog stickiness and suggests avenues for future research.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Kathryn Gow, Chantelle Warren, David Anthony and Connie Hinschen

In response to both the increasing concern of the declining rates of apprentices and the limited research in this area, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

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1852

Abstract

Purpose

In response to both the increasing concern of the declining rates of apprentices and the limited research in this area, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the individual processes involved in apprentices' decisions to remain in their apprenticeship.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically, five individual domains were investigated: motivation style (intrinsic and extrinsic motivation); coping style (emotion‐focused and problem‐focused); apprentice experiences (satisfaction, work conditions, expectations, formal training and recognition); financial responsibility; and demographic factors (age, geographic location, education/training and organisational tenure). Three measures were used to assess these five domains: the work preference inventory, the brief cope and the apprentice experience questionnaire. A total of 326 male participants were recruited from Victoria and Queensland.

Findings

Logistic regression was performed to determine if motivation style, coping style, apprentice experiences and demographic factors could predict thoughts towards remaining in an apprenticeship. A Chi‐square test was conducted to determine if financial responsibility had an impact on thoughts towards remaining in a trade. Overall results suggested that intrinsic motivation, satisfaction, working conditions and geographic location could predict apprentices' thoughts towards staying in an apprenticeship.

Research limitations/implications

The results can only be generalised to those who were currently undertaking an apprenticeship and not those who had already left. Furthermore, the outcome variable in this study was “thoughts towards quitting” and not actual quitting per se; however, social desirability effects may have influenced the responses somewhat.

Originality/value

By utilising this data, educators and employers alike could now be one step closer to retaining the much‐needed apprentices of Australia and it may be that other countries such as Germany, India, France, Turkey, the USA, and the UK may pool informational research resources to counter the global downturn in apprentices' availability.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Christopher Richardson and Hsin-Wei Wong

Existing studies on expatriate academics (EAs) are primarily set in advanced-country settings, thus overlooking the EA experience in developing and emerging markets. With…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing studies on expatriate academics (EAs) are primarily set in advanced-country settings, thus overlooking the EA experience in developing and emerging markets. With this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the motivating factors behind EAs taking up jobs in Malaysia, and their adjustment and retention experiences in their host country.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 17 EAs working in four public universities in Malaysia.

Findings

Among the chief motivating factors for expatriation were familiarity with the country, the perceived desirable cultural/religious environment, and favourable research environment. Adjustment-wise, there was something of a mixed experience, with most adjusting well socially, but many citing disappointment with work. Such sentiment has contributed to reducing retention plans among several of the respondents.

Originality/value

The study explores the EA experience in the context of an emerging market. At present much of the literature focuses on EAs working in advanced economies. This paper indicates that the motivation, adjustment, and retention cognition of EAs in emerging markets may not be entirely consistent with what previous studies have suggested.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

David A Harrison, Margaret A Shaffer and Purnima Bhaskar-Shrinivas

We review 25 years of research on expatriate experiences concentrating on expatriate adjustment as a central construct, and relying on a general stressor-stress-strain…

Abstract

We review 25 years of research on expatriate experiences concentrating on expatriate adjustment as a central construct, and relying on a general stressor-stress-strain framework. First, we consider who expatriates are, why their experiences differ from domestic employees, and what adjustment is. Conceptualizing (mal)adjustment in terms of stress, we next review the stressors and strains associated with it. Consolidating the wide range of antecedents (anticipatory and in-country) that have been studied to date, we note major patterns of effects and their implications for how HR managers can facilitate adjustment. Although relatively less research has focused on the consequences of adjustment, enough evidence exists to establish a bottom-line impact of poor adjustment on performance. To stimulate future efforts to understand the experiences of expatriates, we discuss the challenges and opportunities of continuing down this road of research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-103-3

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Doo Hun Lim, Dae Seok Chai, Sunyoung Park and Min Young Doo

Although the field of neuroscience has evolved dramatically, little research has attempted to conceptualize the impact of neuroscience on the field of human resource…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the field of neuroscience has evolved dramatically, little research has attempted to conceptualize the impact of neuroscience on the field of human resource development (HRD). The purpose of this study is an integrative review of the influential relationship between neuroscience and workplace learning including applicable implications for HRD research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing 93 studies on neuroscience and brain-based learning published between 1995 and 2017, the authors synthesized their findings.

Findings

This study discusses the basic concepts of neuroscience such as the structure and functions of the brain, neuroscientific findings about memory and cognition, the effect of neural transmitters on memory and cognition and the neuroscience of learning. This study also illustrates brain-based learning styles affecting learning and describes various neuroscientific learning principles and models that can be applied to practical planning and the delivery of workplace learning and HRD activities.

Originality/value

This study concludes with brain-based learning principles called neuroscientism compared with traditional learning theories. It also includes several brain-based learning cases from workplace settings and implications for future research and further HRD practices.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2018

Jan Selmer

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Jean L. Dyer

Each of the four objectives can be applied within the military training environment. Military training often requires that soldiers achieve specific levels of performance…

Abstract

Each of the four objectives can be applied within the military training environment. Military training often requires that soldiers achieve specific levels of performance or proficiency in each phase of training. For example, training courses impose entrance and graduation criteria, and awards are given for excellence in military performance. Frequently, training devices, training media, and training evaluators or observers also directly support the need to diagnose performance strengths and weaknesses. Training measures may be used as indices of performance, and to indicate the need for additional or remedial training.

Details

The Science and Simulation of Human Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-296-2

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Soumendu Biswas

Despite organizational socialization and support, contemporary managers often perceive employees to be less engaged and attached to their workplace, multiplying their…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite organizational socialization and support, contemporary managers often perceive employees to be less engaged and attached to their workplace, multiplying their workload with unsolicited vexations and worries. In this connection, the purpose of this paper is to explore and possibly confirm the ameliorative role of organizational identification as a mediator between employees' perceptions of organizational support and justice and their favorable association to their levels of engagement and attenuation of their intentions to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Suitable theories such as the social exchange and fairness heuristics theories were examined to select and support the study constructs. Accordingly, the literature was reviewed to formulate the study hypotheses and connect them through a conceptual latent variable model (LVM). Data were collected from 402 full-time managerial executives all over India. The data thus collected were subjected to structural equation modeling (SEM) procedures.

Findings

All the measures used in this study had acceptable reliabilities as indicated by their Cronbach's Alpha values. Based on the SEM procedures all the study hypotheses and one of the competing LVMs labeled as LVM5 was finally accepted.

Originality/value

The distinctive feature of this study is the theoretical compilation of all the study constructs in one LVM and subsequent empirical verification of the same. This study is, perhaps, the first of its kind to examine the implications of such justice-based perceptions of social exchange relations between employees and their organizations in India more so, since it considers support and justice to complement each other as an interactive whole.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Burna Nayar and Surabhi Koul

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of three learning tools – listening, structured doodling and note-taking – on recall ability of students in the classroom. The authors have specifically compared the effect of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al.’s (2017) structured doodling condition (i.e. shading in shapes) vis-à-vis note-taking and listening.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental research design was used for the study where three groups of around 40 participants each were created. The participants were Indian students (72 males and 48 females) who were undergraduates at NMIMS University, Navi Mumbai. Each group experienced all the three learning methods that are listening, note-taking and structured doodling. It was a 3×3 mixed model design. Listening, note-taking and structured doodling were compared on recall ability. This was assessed using a questionnaire extracted from Boggs et al.’s (2017) study and a self-designed evaluation sheet.

Findings

Across all three groups, structured doodling and note-taking had a higher impact on recall ability than the traditional method. However, the difference in the impact of note-taking and doodling on recall ability was not practically very large. The current finding assumes higher significance in the Indian education set up as Indian students are accustomed to note-taking as a learning tool yet structured doodling had a statistically analogous effect on recall ability compared to a systematically documented note-taking. Hence, a future direction could be to assess the impact of a blended learning tool that utilizes both note-taking and doodling or note-taking through doodling.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors did not capture doodling habits of the students. Second, the study limits itself to a small sample size of 120 management graduates. The study can be extended to other disciplines like science and technology and also on how the higher engagement learning tools can be utilized in the normal environs of a course in a classroom. A future direction of the study can be to engage students in an activity as long as a regular lecture of about 60 min. A fusion of learning tools that effectively combines note-taking and doodling can be suggested to enhance recall ability and classroom engagement.

Practical implications

Higher order learning tools characteristically require technologically advanced infrastructure setups. In developing economies like India, most educational institutes may not have access to technologically advanced classrooms; hence, the implementation of higher engagement learning tools becomes a huge challenge. The endeavor in this study has been to study the impact and effectiveness of learning tools like doodling and note-taking which do not inherently call for access to advanced technology.

Social implications

In today’s age of globalization, emerging economies like India are seen to be taking center stage. Thus, ensuring that Indian education system is geared up to train students to compete globally and in the same vein, these students have access to higher engagement learning tools – the absolute need of the hour. Hence, the current research aims to bridge the gap between global education innovations and Indian classroom teaching method implementation.

Originality/value

The research has assessed the effectiveness of three different learning tools, namely – listening, note-taking and structured doodling – in Indian higher education setup. The current research is in harmony with the current literature and would function as an adaptation and augmentation of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al. (2017) studies. A very scanty research body on understanding the impact of learning tools on recall ability exists in the Indian education setup. Current research will act as a bridge between global path breaking education research and implementation of in-class teaching methods in Indian higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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