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1 – 10 of over 3000

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-377-4

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Jörgen Svensson and Marieke van Genugten

Equal treatment in the workplace is considered one of the most fundamental rights of employees. This right also implies that employees must be able to address any form of…

Abstract

Purpose

Equal treatment in the workplace is considered one of the most fundamental rights of employees. This right also implies that employees must be able to address any form of unequal treatment freely and effectively, without fear of retaliation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence of retaliation against complaints of unequal treatment in The Netherlands and its underlying factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a telephone survey among employees who filed a formal complaint about unequal treatment at work to the Dutch Equal Treatment Commission.

Findings

The main finding is that retaliation against equal treatment reports is commonplace in The Netherlands and in many cases takes on serious forms. Furthermore it is found that the nature and extent of retaliation are primarily explained by the circumstances in which unequal treatment develops and that the extent of retaliation is neither explained by the manner in which unequal treatment is addressed nor by the level of institutionalized protection that is available.

Originality/value

The need for a better understanding of retaliation is high, because retaliation and fear of retaliation have broad consequences for the psychological and physical well‐being of individual employees and for employment relationships. Yet, studies on retaliation in the context of employment discrimination are rare, especially outside the USA. This article contributes to a better understanding of retaliation, which may be used by policy makers, employees and employers to address it more effectively.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jeffrey Michael Cancino and Roger Enriquez

A survey of the literature shows that researchers have assessed the social processes of retaliation among adversarial crime prone populations. However, notably absent from…

2025

Abstract

A survey of the literature shows that researchers have assessed the social processes of retaliation among adversarial crime prone populations. However, notably absent from this research is the study of peer retaliation among non‐adversarial and less crime prone populations, such as police officers. The underlying theoretical premise is that peer retaliation, defined here as a mechanism of social control, operates under prevailing police culture conditions.Using focus group interviews collected from one large Southwestern police department, content analysis is used to qualitatively examine the influence of peer retaliation on officer deviance (i.e. reporting incidents of illegal force). The results show that officers' rationalize peer retaliation according to morality and deterrence; while, types of retaliation sanctioned against peers include ostracism and no cover. The implications of these findings are considered.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Tae‐Yeol Kim and Debra L. Shapiro

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether negative emotions mediate the relationship between supervisor rudeness and subordinates' retaliatory reactions and how the…

1393

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether negative emotions mediate the relationship between supervisor rudeness and subordinates' retaliatory reactions and how the reactions to supervisor rudeness differ between US Americans and Koreans and between in‐group and out‐group supervisors.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey involving 197 employees from USA and South Korea. MANCOVA was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Employees who were rudely (rather than politely) treated when receiving explanations for organizational decisions were more likely to engage in retaliation. The latter tendency was partially mediated by the negative emotions that the employees felt about their rude treatment. In addition, the rudeness‐retaliation effects became stronger when the supervisor was dissimilar (rather than similar) to them, and the latter two‐way interaction effect was even stronger to those who highly value vertical collectivism. Surprisingly, however, Koreans were more likely to retaliate against their supervisor rather than US Americans.

Research limitations/implications

Previous scenario‐based studies contrasting Koreans and US Americans have yielded findings suggesting that Koreans and US American employees may differ in their responses to supervisory rudeness. Additionally, the tendency of people to be more attracted to similar rather than dissimilar others (consistent with the similarity‐attraction paradigm) suggests that the (dis)similarity of a supervisor is likely to influence the rudeness‐retaliation effect. Future research needs to examine when, how, and why employees retaliate against supervisory rudeness to better understand the retaliation dynamics in organizations.

Originality/value

This is the only study that has examined how, in the context of receiving rude treatment from a supervisor, retaliatory reactions by US American versus Korean employees may differ and why (i.e. via emotional mediating variables), and whether US American‐Korean differences in retaliation under these circumstances are influenced by the supervisor's perceived (dis)similarity.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2010

Angela Miles, Marka Fleming and Arlise P. McKinney

Retaliation complaints in the workplace have increased 71 percent in the past ten years with a record high of more than 32,000 complaints filed in 2008. The purpose of…

2117

Abstract

Purpose

Retaliation complaints in the workplace have increased 71 percent in the past ten years with a record high of more than 32,000 complaints filed in 2008. The purpose of this paper is to review retaliation legislation to clarify for employers and employees the protected provisions and provide guidance for complying with this important anti‐discrimination statute to aid in promoting a fair and unbiased work environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews retaliation claims in cases of US employment discrimination including the central elements and covered individuals. It also reviews key recent rulings that have broadened what constitutes retaliation to better understand its impact in workforce management practices. Equity and organizational justice theories are drawn upon to address performance management and employee discipline issues that may arise in the workplace and how organizational action may be impacted by the retaliation statute.

Findings

Retaliation is often considered to be an overt act (e.g. demotion or termination) but this review demonstrates that adverse employment actions need not be overt or result from loss of job or wages by the employee. This review can be used to avoid costly litigation but also convey that retaliation statutes do not unduly influence the employer's right to discipline employees.

Originality/value

This paper helps practitioners and researchers better understand retaliation and its purpose in preventing unfair work practices. This historical review of retaliation should help improve employer policies and procedures as well as training efforts in complying with equal employment opportunity laws without compromising concerns related to productivity or disciplinary procedures.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

David Vidal

The purpose of this research is to examine why a buying firm in a marketing channel may retaliate against its supplier. The objective of this paper is thus to understand…

1119

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine why a buying firm in a marketing channel may retaliate against its supplier. The objective of this paper is thus to understand the individual and organizational variables that may prompt a buying company to retaliate against its supplier following negative critical incidents (NCI).

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 171 retailers associated with one focal manufacturer and analyzed through PLS path modeling procedures.

Findings

Results demonstrate that retaliation is the outcome of individual factors related to a buyer's cognitive (causal attributions) and emotional (anger) processes triggered by NCI as well as organizational forces (trust and dependence) related to more stable characteristics of the interfirm relationship.

Originality/value

Compared with existing contributions, the proposed model adopts a multilevel approach and considers retaliation as the outcome of individual as well as organizational forces. On the individual level, echoing the rapidly growing idea that emotions, not just cognitions, are a relevant object of study within interorganizational relationships, this paper empirically investigates the effect of one negative emotion (anger) and of causal attributions in buyer-seller partnerships. On the organizational level, this research examines the influence of trust and dependence, two central variables in business-to-business marketing theory, which seem closely related to retaliation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Ling Yang and Ruilian Xu

This paper aims to examine the predictors of whistleblowing behaviors by comparing the importance of a negative perception – fear of whistleblowing – relative to positive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the predictors of whistleblowing behaviors by comparing the importance of a negative perception – fear of whistleblowing – relative to positive perceptions such as ethical orientation, professional identity and supervisor trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested using relative regression analysis with data collected from 471 banking employees in nine Chinese organizations.

Findings

The findings conclude that fear of retaliation was dominant in predicting external, but not internal, whistleblowing, and the beneficial effects of positive perceptions on internal whistleblowing are contingent on employees’ fear of retaliation. Therefore, organizations should survey employees’ perceptions of whistleblowing and their company retaliation policies to accomplish the goal of promoting ethical behaviors while discouraging unethical behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that efforts to promote whistleblowing in organizations may be most successful if the focus is placed on deterring retaliation and highlighting for employees that they will be protected from retaliation.

Originality/value

The relative weights analyses suggest that fear of retaliation from whistleblowing is the dominant predictor of external whistleblowing; as fear of retaliation increases, so does the desire to blow the whistle externally.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Ilene V. Goldberg and Ira Sprotzer

The specific purpose of this paper is to research the relevant case law with regard to the legality of retaliation for workplace discrimination claims.

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Abstract

Purpose

The specific purpose of this paper is to research the relevant case law with regard to the legality of retaliation for workplace discrimination claims.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is traditional legal research and analysis.

Findings

This paper examines standards for proving retaliation, along with the impact of recent US Supreme Court decisions on employers and employees.

Research implications/implications

The research provides a framework for evaluating retaliation claims.

Originality/value

This research is of value to both employers and employees in deciding the standards for proving a retaliation claim.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Ya Zhang, Jing Zhang and Kongkidakarn Sakulsinlapakorn

Extant literature holds contradictory views about the brand love’s moderation effect in the link between brand failure and consumer’s retaliation. This paper aims to first…

1801

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature holds contradictory views about the brand love’s moderation effect in the link between brand failure and consumer’s retaliation. This paper aims to first examine how failure severity correlates with negative emotions and how negative emotions lead to retaliation intention. Then, it probes into opposite moderation effects of brand love in these two stages. Further, it explores contingent factors, including perceived fairness, inferred goodwill, aggressive personality and brand trust, which may moderate “love is blind” effect or “love becomes hate” effect.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted among the sample of 293 responses from Thailand, and 239 responses from China. A total of eight hypotheses were tested by adopting hierarchical regression technique and slope analyses.

Findings

The results show that consumers facing brand failure suffer negative emotions and then generate retaliation intention. Brand love positively moderates the link between failure severity and negative emotions, which is called “love becomes hate” effect. Meanwhile, brand love negatively moderates the link between negative emotions and retaliation intention, which is called “love is blind” effect. In addition, perceived fairness and inferred goodwill alleviate “love becomes hate” effect, and aggressive personality decreases “love is blind” effect.

Originality/value

This study makes contribution to brand failure literature by revealing twofold moderating roles of brand love in arousing retaliation behavior of consumers who encounter product/service failure, as well as contingent factors of these roles. Also, the research findings provide managerial implications to brand managers as to how to manage brand failure and reduce consumers’ retaliation by manipulating brand love and relevant contingent variables.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Frank Solano and Brian H. Kleiner

Showcases workplace retaliation and describes this as when an employer illegally seeks revenge on an employee who has complained of discrimination or some other, allegedly…

1149

Abstract

Showcases workplace retaliation and describes this as when an employer illegally seeks revenge on an employee who has complained of discrimination or some other, allegedly unlawful, act by the employer. Gives examples of retaliation and advises on how companies should aim to avoid this. Concludes there are many resources available for businesses that need assistance in implementing a preventive retaliation policy.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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