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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2018

Diptiman Banerji and Prashant Mishra

The purpose of this paper is to understand the ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers towards foreign multi-brand retailers (FMBRs), and the influence that such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the ethnocentric tendencies of Indian consumers towards foreign multi-brand retailers (FMBRs), and the influence that such ethnocentrism has on their attitudes towards, and future purchasing behaviour from, these international retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a mall intercept method with a randomised data collection process to secure data from 119 organised retail shoppers in a major metropolitan Indian city. The analysis was carried out using analysis of covariance, bootstrapping mediation, multiple regression analysis, and Johnson’s relative weight analysis.

Findings

Two main results are as follows: concern for livelihoods of small retailers and a perception that earnings of foreign retailers are unjust are revealed as the most significant drivers of negative attitude towards FMBRs, and although high ethnocentric customers have a strong negative attitude towards FMBRs, they are open to the idea of making future purchases of goods that are not available with small retailers, from the foreign retail outlets.

Research limitations/implications

The study sample is from a single metropolitan city, albeit one which serves as a miniature version of the Indian society. As a limitation, the results might not be generalisable to small, non-metropolitan Indian towns.

Practical implications

These results provide valuable input regarding the marketing strategy and sustainability of foreign retailers planning to launch operations in India. For example, FMBRs should position themselves as not being in competition with existing small retail shops by offering a different array of products. Further, younger and more educated Indians are the least ethnocentric towards FMBRs, thus making them an attractive target segment.

Originality/value

Extant research has studied consumer ethnocentrism of Indian consumers towards foreign brands and products, but not towards FMBRs. This paper attempts to fill that research gap.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Md Washim Raja, Sandip Anand and David Allan

Studying the role of advertising music (ad music) in a retail context can be an emergence of new marketing practices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Studying the role of advertising music (ad music) in a retail context can be an emergence of new marketing practices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the potential usage and utility of ad music as an atmospheric stimulus in contrast to music (retail music) as an atmospheric stimulus. This paper also aims to provide a model, which depicts how ad music could be an alternative to retail music in retail settings with regard to consumers’ attitudinal influence and its optimistic correlation with related marketing outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviewed the literature related to the role of retail music as an atmospheric stimulus and studies related to the role of music in the ad.

Findings

Advertising music as an atmospheric stimulus is more likely to influence consumers’ attitude towards advertising music, towards advertising and towards the advertised brand. Contrary to retail music, advertising music as an atmospheric stimulus may help a consumer for ad recall, ad message/brand information recall, brand recall, brand identification and brand recognition. Consequently, advertising music may always have an advantage over retail music with regard to purchase intent, brand choice and financial return.

Practical implications

This work may encourage the advertisers for the proper usage of ad music as an atmospheric stimulus that may holistically magnify the saliency of advertising theoretically and practically.

Originality/value

This study is a novel attempt to conceptualise the potential scope of utilisation of ad music in the retail context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Aradhana Gandhi and Ravi Shankar

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the performance of Indian retailers in recent past and derive meaningful insight for practicing managers in this area.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the performance of Indian retailers in recent past and derive meaningful insight for practicing managers in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses the economic efficiencies of select Indian retailers using three related methodologies: Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), Malmquist Productivity Index (MPI) and Bootstrapped Tobit Regression.

Findings

DEA analysis has shown that five retail firms out of selected 18 are found as efficient under the CCR model of DEA and seven out of 18 retail firms are efficient under the BCC model of DEA. MPI results indicate that 61 percent of the firms have progressed in terms of the MPI during the period under consideration. The Bootstrapped Tobit Regression shows that number of retail outlets and mergers and acquisitions can be considered as the driving forces influencing efficiency of retailers in India.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has a limitation with reference to the availability of data for a few retail outlets, especially in the modeling through the Bootstrapped Tobit Regression.

Originality/value

This study seems to be the first in applying productivity analysis using DEA, MPI and Bootstrapped Tobit Regression for the Indian retail sector.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Thomas Reardon and Bart Minten

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the patterns and dynamics of the diffusion of modern food retail in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the patterns and dynamics of the diffusion of modern food retail in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on detailed sales data from retail chains in India, short case studies of retail chains, and review of literature.

Findings

The article presents three surprises concerning modern food retail diffusion in India. First, modern retail has developed in three “waves”, with the first wave, government retail chains, starting in the 1960s/1970s, cooperative retail chains starting in the 1970s/1980s, and private retail chains in the 1990s/2000s. All three were substantial, and internationally uniquely, all three coexist in the 2000s as segments of modern retail. Second, the rise of modern private retail in India in the past six years has been among the fastest in the world, growing at 49 percent a year on average over that period, and bouncing back to growth after a dip from the recent recession. The great majority of modern private retail has arisen in 2007‐2010. Third, beside the uniqueness of the coexistence of three types of retail noted above, Indian private retail chain development has unique or rare characteristics: driven by domestic capital investment, “early” (in terms of usual international patterns) diversification into small formats, “early” penetration of small cities and even rural towns, of the food markets of the poor and lower‐middle class, and of fresh produce retail. These unique factors have helped to propel it quickly.

Originality/value

For the first time in the literature, the paper presents an analysis of: the three waves in Indian retail; detailed sales data for all leading chains; and its uniqueness.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Chrysostomos Giannoulakis and Artemisia Apostolopoulou

The present study aims to explore the efforts of a core action sports company (Board Sports Company (BSC)) to employ a multi‐brand strategy and to focus on the identity…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to explore the efforts of a core action sports company (Board Sports Company (BSC)) to employ a multi‐brand strategy and to focus on the identity and reach of the seven distinct brands operated under the parent company. The study seeks to identify benefits and limitations of the multi‐brand strategy, as seen by company employees.

Design/methodology/approach

In a single‐case design study approach, a global, private action sports company, recognized as a leader in authentic action sports footwear and apparel, was selected for study. Data were collected via in‐depth interviews with key company employees and an extensive review of secondary sources.

Findings

The adoption of a multi‐brand strategy with the operation of seven distinct brands has allowed BSC to expand to mainstream audiences, while strengthening its core target markets. Through aggressive consumer segmentation practices and the strategic utilization of a variety of distribution outlets, BSC remains competitive in a highly antagonistic business environment.

Practical implications

Possibly the greatest benefit of a multi‐brand strategy is a company's ability to diversify, while minimizing the risk of transferring potentially harmful associations among its brands. Thus, BSC has expanded its reach into the mainstream through new sports, product lines, distribution channels, and target audiences. Simultaneously, the organization has guarded the perception of authenticity of its core brands.

Originality/value

The study extends the understanding of the management of sport brands by moving beyond collegiate and professional sport organizations to focus on an athletic wear and equipment brand. It also offers insight to sport organizations that might consider expansion via the adoption of a multi‐brand strategy.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Chinmay Tumbe and Shashank Krishnakumar

This paper aims to understand the factors affecting the evolution of retailing in India since the mid-nineteenth century.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the factors affecting the evolution of retailing in India since the mid-nineteenth century.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares the trajectories of four distinct retail stores in India – Spencer’s pan-Indian retailing empire since 1863, Akbarallys’ department store chain in Mumbai since 1897, Apna Bazar’s consumer cooperative chain in Mumbai since 1948 and the Future Group’s pan-Indian retailing chain since the 1980s. Historical sources include firm biographies and newspaper archives.

Findings

This paper proposes a systems theory linking environmental influences and service innovation, to explain the evolution of retailing in India since the mid-nineteenth century. The key environmental influence on retailing has been state patronage – colonialism and high-end department stores until the 1940s, socialism and cooperative stores until the 1980s and liberalisation with restricted foreign direct investment in retailing until 2015 associated with indigenous corporate large retail format stores. Service innovation in terms of home delivery and recreation of the bazaar atmosphere due to norms on gender and community have also interacted to shape individual success in modern retailing and the dominance of small shop retailing over the long run.

Research limitations/implications

This paper questions standard accounts of retailing history in India that began with the late-twentieth century by showing the scale of a pan-Indian retailing chain in the early-twentieth century. It also provides an account of retailers that is missing in the current literature on the history of consumption in India.

Practical implications

Findings of this study will be useful to marketing professionals and teachers who wish to learn more about the history of retailing in India. It also shows how retailers navigated changes in the regulatory and business environment.

Originality/value

Through a comparative study, this paper outlines the environmental influences on retail formats and service innovation strategies that are required to serve the Indian market. It also brings to fore the significance of retailing chains in colonial India.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Jean-Baptiste Welte, Olivier Badot and Patrick Hetzel

The purpose of this study is to understand how narratives are generated in stores.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand how narratives are generated in stores.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design is based on ethnographies documented in 10 sports stores in the Paris region. The ethnographic method enables a precise and in situ observation of how narratives are structured. Narrative structures develop from the accommodation of the narratives specific to retailers and narratives specific to the customer.

Findings

The findings of this study identified four main narratives in retail spaces (the serial, the tale, the epic, the legend), each of which is distinguished by the commercial/non-commercial orientation of the narratives and by a superficial/in-depth modification of the narratives produced outside the store. These four narratives are characterized by the vendors’ roles and by the distinct interactions between customers and retail stores.

Research limitations/implications

The originality of this study is to propose a narrative framework for retail structures. It illustrates the fact that the narrative is not solely a product of experiential marketing, but that it may be found in any retail store. From a practical point of view, it highlights other less costly experiential narrative strategies.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, it highlights other less costly experiential narrative strategies.

Originality/value

The original value of this study is to apply structural semiotics to analyse narratives in the store.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

R.K. Srivastava

The research presented here aims to build a picture of the changes in retail taking place in India. India is poised to become a retail power house. The paper looks at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research presented here aims to build a picture of the changes in retail taking place in India. India is poised to become a retail power house. The paper looks at the changing scene in the retail sector in view of many MNCs and large industries entering into this segment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were drawn from industry sources which included national and international published sources from 1993‐2006.

Findings

The findings presented show that malls in 2006 are more developed in the North and West part of India. Food, groceries and apparel purchase by customers contributed to 52 percent. On average 75 percent of customers spend about 1‐3 hours in the mall. Malls with multiplexes such as cinema theatres, food courts, play places for children are becoming the centre for family outings. Small retailers have improved their service to cater to Indian consumers. Credit limits and home service are helping them to hold on to their customers. Retailing focus is changing towards satisfying the different hierarchy of needs of customers.

Research limitations/implications

All are from Indian perspectives which perhaps limits its usefulness else where in the world.

Practical implication

A very useful source of information and review of this scenario which should help other retailers across the world, especially in developing economies, to face big giants more aggressively and do better.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified information/resources need and offers guidance to small retailers

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Karine Picot-Coupey, Jean-Laurent Viviani and Paul Amadieu

Why do some retail networks operate shop-in-shops along with stand-alone units while others do not? Drawing on a resource-based and intellectual capital (IC) perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

Why do some retail networks operate shop-in-shops along with stand-alone units while others do not? Drawing on a resource-based and intellectual capital (IC) perspective as a broad theoretical lens, the purpose of this paper is to focus on retailer-run shop-in-shops and examine the determinants of their adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

To gain a comprehensive understanding of shop-in-shop adoption by retail branded networks, a research design mixing a quantitative study (n = 170) and a qualitative study (n = 19) was adopted to test nine hypotheses regarding these determinants of the adoption of retailer-run shop-in-shops and explore in greater depth the processes whereby they actually occur.

Findings

The main findings show that intangible resources are major determinants of the choice to operate shop-in-shops while tangible resources are minor determinants. The more robust results of the analysis lie in the positive effect of own-label merchandise range, premium pricing strategy, positioning based on symbols, retail concept fast renewal and high sector specialisation on the choice to operate a shop-in-shop. The effect of financial constraints on the decision to expand via shop-in-shops is limited.

Research limitations/implications

The authors emphasise the importance of marketing-related and company-related characteristics in differentiating the likelihood of retail networks to expand via shop-in-shops. These results lend support to the relevance of a resource-based and IC perspective in explaining the propensity of retailers to develop via shop-in-shops.

Practical implications

The decision to operate shop-in-shops should depend on the extent to which intangible resources – the most important being retail positioning grounded in symbols, an own-label merchandise range, and a high retail branded network reputation – can be valued and enhanced. Expanding a retail network via shop-in-shops does not appear to be a financially constrained expansion strategy: it must be considered as a relevant first best strategy when an independent and young retail company has intangible resources to value but limited tangible resources.

Originality/value

The study contributes to channel management and retailing research in four ways. First, it precisely delineates the specific characteristics of shop-in-shops. Second, it provides theoretical explanations – based on a resource and IC perspective – of determinants that influence the choice of shop-in-shops. Third, it empirically tests the influence of marketing-related and company-related characteristics when adopting shop-in-shops. Fourth, it provides insights into how adopting shop-in-shops. To the authors’ knowledge, the research is on the first to analyse theoretically and test the determinants for the choice of retailer-run shop-in-shops.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Jaya Halepete and K.V. Seshadri Iyer

The main purposes of this paper are to perform a micro‐ and macro‐dimensional analysis, and to apply the theory of eclectic firm to understand the investment dimension in…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purposes of this paper are to perform a micro‐ and macro‐dimensional analysis, and to apply the theory of eclectic firm to understand the investment dimension in the apparel retail environment in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A micro and micro analysis of the retail industry in India was conducted. Eclectic firm theory was then applied to the analysis to understand the apparel retail environment in India.

Findings

The key findings of the study are that foreign retailers looking to successfully capitalize on India's impressive growth need to understand several driving attributes such as strong and distinct culture, population distribution, and local conditions, and risks that are indeed unique to India.

Originality/value

This report makes a contribution towards a comprehensive understanding of the Indian apparel retail market. It is desirable for foreign retailers to acquire such knowledge in order to devise suitable strategies to enter and compete in the Indian marketplace. In addition, this study provides researchers to undertake more in‐depth analysis of the market to explore the different facets of the attractive yet complex Indian environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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