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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Ardon C.W. Iton

The purpose of this paper is to identify the demographic characteristics that influence the choice of retail outlet and the preferred retail outlet used by primary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the demographic characteristics that influence the choice of retail outlet and the preferred retail outlet used by primary household shoppers when purchasing roots and tubers (R&Ts).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a binary logit model to estimate the probability of being a traditional or modern outlet shopper for R&Ts.

Findings

The traditional retail outlet was the preferred place to purchase R&Ts. Three demographic variables, age, monthly family income and ethnicity, were statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size might be considered small with only 232 primary household food shoppers participating.

Originality/value

To date, minimal research on the marketing of R&Ts has been undertaken in Trinidad and Tobago. As such, it is hoped that this study will stimulate others to undertake research in this area.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Susan McDowell Mudambi

Retailers face a multitude of strategic choices, with varying levels ofrisk, profitability and societal impact. Sifting through these optionsis a daunting task. In the…

Abstract

Retailers face a multitude of strategic choices, with varying levels of risk, profitability and societal impact. Sifting through these options is a daunting task. In the literature, strategies have been successfully categorized using grids and matrices. Reviews first the strategy matrix approach, especially as applied to retailing; then introduces a topology of strategic choice in retailing which provides a way to assist retailers to think and manage strategically. The topology configures strategies into four directions: internal, horizontal, vertical and migrational. Internal strategies reside at the intraorganizational level and encompass various differentiation and time strategies. Horizontal strategies are expansionary and include choices on outlet numbers, internationalization, mergers and joint ventures. Vertical strategies turn the firm towards its suppliers and include supplier acquisition and improved buyer‐supplier relations. Migrational strategies are extraterritorial and involve radical changes of direction such as changes in outlet size category, location type and outlet type. Recognizing the synergistic interactions within and between the strategic directions is an important aspect of the analysis.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Mika Boedeker

Previous results have indicated that some consumers are lesssatisfied with mundane retail outlets and require more exuberantentertainment. Other consumers, however, do not…

Abstract

Previous results have indicated that some consumers are less satisfied with mundane retail outlets and require more exuberant entertainment. Other consumers, however, do not make for “fun shoppers” and are not likely to in the future. Concentrates on the two largest groups found in the study: the “new‐type shoppers” and the “traditional shoppers”. They were similar in terms of their sociodemographic characteristics and almost so in their choice criteria for a place to shop. They differed only in their desire for experience and recreation while shopping. Examines their psychographic characteristics, behavioural tendencies and actual behaviour patterns in order to deepen the picture of those two groups. Discusses retailers′ activities concerning the personality and image of their outlets in the context of image congruence between a consumer and a retailer outlet.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Faizal Adams, Camillus Abawiera Wongnaa and Edwin Coleman

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study analyzed the profitability of tomato farmers and determinants of farmers' choice of marketing outlets (wholesaler or retailer) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage sampling technique was used to collect data from 100 tomato farmers in Ghana. Analytical tools which include descriptive statistics, gross margin analysis (GM), profitability ratios and binary logit model were employed.

Findings

Profitability analysis indicates that farmers who supply to wholesalers have gross margin of Gh¢7.86 (US$1.67) per 25 kg crate, while farmers who supply to retailers recorded a major loss of Gh¢5.36 (US$1.14) per 25 kg crate. The result suggests that farmers selling to wholesalers are better off than farmers supplying to retailers. The binary logit regression analysis reveals a positive relationship between farmers' choice of marketing outlet (wholesaling) and age of respondents, quantity of tomato sold and cost of labor for production. A negative relationship also existed between farmers' choice of marketing outlet and weighted average selling price and household size.

Research limitations/implications

The results call for policy efforts to provide an enabling environment for more extension education and establishment of farmer associations to make marketing information for price development among farmers available.

Originality/value

The choice of marketing outlet greatly influences profitability of tomato production. This study examines the performance of the various tomato marketing outlets in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Ian Clarke, Alan Hallsworth, Peter Jackson, Ronan de Kervenoael, Rossana Perez‐del‐Aguila and Malcolm Kirkup

The “food deserts” debate can be enriched by setting the particular circumstances of food deserts – areas of very limited consumer choice – within a wider context of…

Abstract

The “food deserts” debate can be enriched by setting the particular circumstances of food deserts – areas of very limited consumer choice – within a wider context of changing retail provision in other areas. This paper’s combined focus on retail competition and consumer choice shifts the emphasis from changing patterns of retail provision towards a more qualitative understanding of how “choice” is actually experienced by consumers at the local level “on the ground”. This argument has critical implications for current policy debates where the emphasis on monopolies and mergers at the national level needs to be brought together with the planning and regulation of retail provision at the local, neighbourhood level.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Jayant Anand

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the proliferation of supermarkets in developing countries using data collected between May 2005 and June 2006 in Citlalicalli, Mexico. Contrary to the experience of most developed countries, this study revealed that supermarkets and small retailers can coexist by catering to different income groups and product categories. Consumer choices are driven by the desire to reduce transaction costs in terms of time and money. In striking a balance between the two, consumers look for retail outlets that offer them the best value for their money with the least amount of time spent in shopping trips. Location of the store plays a critical role in buying choices that consumers make. In developing countries, generally, only high-income consumers can afford to own cars and choose to buy most products in supermarkets. Consumers without cars buy frequently purchased goods (foods) in small stores and infrequently purchased goods (consumer durables) in supermarkets.

Details

Economic Development, Integration, and Morality in Asia and the Americas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-542-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Constantinos D. Theodoridis and Constantinos‐Vasilios Priporas

This paper aims to evaluate the relationship between demographics and the choice of retail outlet in the computer retailing sector in Greece so as to provide a general…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the relationship between demographics and the choice of retail outlet in the computer retailing sector in Greece so as to provide a general understanding of what criteria home computer users' use in selecting a retail outlet.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 600 consumers was employed. The respondents had purchased a computer or a peripheral device at most four weeks prior to the interview. The data was collected through personal interviews. Also, a pilot test for content and face validity was conducted. Descriptive statistics, as well regression and factor analysis, were performed to evaluate the data.

Findings

Demographics have a strong predicting power over store choice in the computer retailing sector in Greece. Retail location, which is traditionally considered among the most important store choice determinants, is not that strong in the case of the purchase of computers and peripherals.

Research limitations/implications

In order to generalise from the current findings a stratified sample in terms of demographics and geographical coverage could be used and examined. In addition, the influence of e‐purchases should be considered.

Practical implications

Competition in retailing relies on an understanding of consumer behaviour. The results are partially consistent with the findings of previous studies in other retailing sectors and also suggest retailing strategy implication for retailers operating in Greece.

Originality/value

The paper is unique because it analyses store selection criteria in computer retailing, a field where very few similar research studies exist.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Richard R. Brand and J. Joseph Cronin

Examines the relationship between consumer‐specific constructs and the size of consumer retail choice sets for four different types of retailers: convenience/quick‐stop…

Abstract

Examines the relationship between consumer‐specific constructs and the size of consumer retail choice sets for four different types of retailers: convenience/quick‐stop stores, fast‐food outlets, health clubs and medical services. Includes in the analysis consumer experience, product class importance, brand‐decision importance, perceived risk, brand loyalty and demographics as predictors of the size of awareness, consideration/evoked and reconsideration set sizes. Finds that when comparing physical goods as opposed to service providers, the size of retail choice sets differs significantly and that consumer experience and reseller loyalty are important predictors of choice set size. Indicates that the size of a consumer’s choice set decreases as a retailer’s product offerings move along the continuum from pure physical goods to pure services. Identifies and discusses managerial and research implications of the results.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim

Transport mode attributes have often been neglected in the retailing and transportation literature in retail outlets choice studies. Most of the retailing and…

Abstract

Transport mode attributes have often been neglected in the retailing and transportation literature in retail outlets choice studies. Most of the retailing and transportation literature has only adopted the traditional measures of deterrence, namely, travel time, distance and/or travel cost. Similar phenomena exist in real estate research, particularly in real estate market analysis and valuation. However, a few studies have shown that other attributes of the travel component, such as comfort, reliability of transport mode, etc., are significant in affecting shopping centres’ patronage. With the heightening of issues such as sustainable development and environmental pollution, many governments are gearing to provide greater choices and better quality public transport modes to shopping centres. Therefore, with more transport options, shoppers are likely to consider the characteristics of each transport option in greater detail in their choice of shopping centres. Therefore, in view of this widespread phenomenon, it is timely to provide greater understanding of the travel components in shopping trips. In the light of the above development, this paper aims to disaggregate the travel components in shopping centre choice. By way of principal component analysis, it presents the salient dimensions of transport attributes and shopping centre characteristics in shopping centre choice. Using the weighted factor rating, it found that, in addition to the shopping centre attributes, as well as the conventional measures of travel components, shoppers consider other travel factors in their choice of shopping centres. This in turn has implications on valuation practices.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Jan Vannoppen, Wim Verbeke and Guido Van Huylenbroeck

This paper compares consumer motivation for buying “Integrated production” certified and labelled apples through either farm shops or supermarkets. The research…

Abstract

This paper compares consumer motivation for buying “Integrated production” certified and labelled apples through either farm shops or supermarkets. The research methodology builds on means‐end‐chain (MEC) theory, with data collected through personal laddering interviews in Belgium. Hierarchical value maps, which visualise motivational structures of supermarket and farm shop purchase of quality labelled apples, are presented. Apple buyers at both outlet types pursue similar values, with health being paramount, but realise those values through largely different MECs. The findings reveal interactions between market channel characteristics and product attributes. Also, the study shows how outlet choice influences the perception and the motivation structure of the respondents for fresh apples. From the findings, implications pertaining to advertising are set forth through the application of the “Means‐end conceptualisation of the components of advertising strategy” or MECCAS model.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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