Search results

1 – 10 of over 48000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Poorni Sakrabani, Ai Ping Teoh and Azlan Amran

The Malaysian retail industry, which contributes toward almost 45 per cent of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is on a downward trend. As such, the main purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The Malaysian retail industry, which contributes toward almost 45 per cent of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is on a downward trend. As such, the main purpose of this study is to improve the performance of the Malaysian retail industry through the incorporation of Industry 4.0 technologies. The incorporation of Industry 4.0 technologies in the retail industry has led to the emergence of Retail 4.0 which can also be defined as omni-channel retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

The adoption of Retail 4.0, which is a combination of omni-channel retailing and also novel technologies, has been proven to improve the performance of retailers in many countries. As such, the authors have given suggestions on how Retail 4.0 can be incorporated by Malaysian retailers for the betterment of the Malaysian retail industry.

Findings

Problems faced by retailers these days are boring `brick and mortar' stores, out of stock (OOS) issues, price discrepancy and long queues. Retail 4.0 has enabled retailers to overcome these problems by creating novel shopping experiences, better inventory management, and improved operational efficiency and also more informed decision making in real time.

Limitations

The incorporation of Industry 4.0 technologies in Malaysia is still in the infancy stage. As such, skilled professionals need to be brought in to help implement these technologies in the retail industry.

Practical implications

Omni-channel retailing and the usage of various technologies by `brick and mortar' stores is very appealing to Malaysia's Gen Y and Gen Z who make up 67 per cent of the country's population. The spending power of this young generation can help to boost the performance of the Malaysian retail industry.

Originality/value

To date, no known study has been done on the impact of Retail 4.0 on Malaysian retailers. The results of this study will be very valuable to managers who are keen to improve the performance of their respective retail channels.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Geoffrey Kiel

Increased market segmentation is likely to be an emerging trend in management education in Australia. To date management education has been “production oriented”…

Abstract

Increased market segmentation is likely to be an emerging trend in management education in Australia. To date management education has been “production oriented”, concentrating on functional areas such as accounting, marketing and human resource management. The formal, institutionalised management education industry has sought to turn out functional specialists (B. Com., B. Bus. (accounting)) or generalist managers (M.B.A., B. Bus. (management)) with an underlying assumption that these graduates will function effectively in any industry.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2020

Bhaskar Chhimwal, Varadraj Bapat and Sarthak Gaurav

The authors examine the industrywise investment preferences of foreign portfolio investors (FPIs), domestic institutional investors (DIIs) and retail investors in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine the industrywise investment preferences of foreign portfolio investors (FPIs), domestic institutional investors (DIIs) and retail investors in the Indian context. They also investigate the factors influencing their preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the quarterly shareholdings and returns data of the Indian market from March 31, 2009 to March 31, 2018, the authors employ analysis of variance to study investors' preferences and a random effect panel data model to examine the factors that influence these preferences.

Findings

FPIs hold proportionally more stocks in service-oriented industries and large-cap firms, DIIs hold proportionally large numbers of shares in paper industries and retail investors hold proportionally more shares in chemicals and textiles. FPIs prefer stocks with a high export-to-sales ratio and firms registered on a foreign stock market. Domestic investors, especially retail investors, prefer small-cap stocks and firms whose operations require local knowledge. In addition, industry heterogeneity determines investment decisions. Firm-specific and macroeconomic factors that influence investment decisions differ across industries. Finally, government policies and reforms also play a key role in attracting investors.

Practical implications

Policymakers can identify the key variables that influence investment, which can help direct and regulate investment in India and similar emerging markets.

Originality/value

This study fills a research gap by addressing how industry-level heterogeneity affects investors' preferences in terms of the industrywise preferences of different types of investors and the factors that influence their preferences.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Michael G. Sternbeck and Heinrich Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe similarities between logistics structures and mid-term planning problems in the grocery retail and automotive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe similarities between logistics structures and mid-term planning problems in the grocery retail and automotive industries in a specific internal section of their respective supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The benchmarking approach is used as a framework for this paper. It is based on insights resulting from several joint projects with grocery retailers and automobile producers. A particular focus of the research was participating in an exchange of ideas and experience between logistics managers in both industry sectors.

Findings

The authors have identified parallels when comparing the internal retail supply chain of the grocery retail industry, which consists of distribution centres, transportation and in-store logistics, with the internal logistics network in the automotive industry, which consists of logistics supermarkets, transportation and work zone operations at the assembly line. Strong similarities have been found for three planning problems related to tactical planning tasks: assigning products and parts to delivery modes, selecting packaging units and loading carriers, and determining delivery cycles. In comparison to retailing, there is a clearer trend in the automotive industry to plan line-back and align processes with the operator's requirements at the assembly line.

Practical implications

For logisticians in grocery retailing and the automotive industry, this paper provides relevant input for functional benchmarking initiatives and offers an inspirational view beyond the horizon.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to focus on similarities in logistics network structures and planning tasks between the two industries from the viewpoint of grocery retailing.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Scarlett C. Wesley, Vanessa Prier Jackson and Minyoung Lee

Soft skills which are a combination of personal qualities and interpersonal skills that help an employer perform their job are an increasingly important concern to…

Abstract

Purpose

Soft skills which are a combination of personal qualities and interpersonal skills that help an employer perform their job are an increasingly important concern to businesses and academia, the purpose of this paper is to determine how students ranked the importance of soft skills and compare their rankings to retailing and tourism management faculty and businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of students, faculty and industry leaders was conducted using an existing survey instrument validated by Crawford et al. (2011). Faculty who were members of retailing and tourism management professional organizations were solicited to participate in the study. Retailing and tourism management students from the researchers’ university were sent a link to complete the survey. All participants were asked to rank the order of importance of the soft skills and their characteristics.

Findings

Variations in the importance of soft skills were reported between the three groups. Variations in the importance of the soft skills characteristics were also identified between the students, faculty, and industry leaders. While communication was identified as the most important soft skill by all three sample groups, experiences was the least important for students and leadership was the least important for faculty and industry leaders.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study was the variation in the sample sizes between the student, faculty, and industry sample. The strength of this study lies in the ability to provide evidence for the need to compare soft skills research results for retailing and tourism management students. Soft skills are found to be important to all three groups, but differences indicate faculty and industry need to work together to clarify exactly what soft skills students need to successfully compete for employment in the retailing and tourism management field.

Originality/value

As the work world continues to change, employers seek workers who have soft skills that support their knowledge base. While technical skills are a current part of educational curricula, soft skills need to be emphasized at the university level so that students gain expertise that prepare them to be successful in this changing workplace.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Lisa McNeill

The purpose of this paper is to address the globalisation/culture issue by comparing two Asian countries in which there has been limited prior research regarding their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the globalisation/culture issue by comparing two Asian countries in which there has been limited prior research regarding their respective supermarket industries, namely, Singapore and Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted a case-study approach, with two general cases (the New Singaporean and Malaysian supermarket retail industries), made up of two embedded cases each (retailers and manufacturers operating within each country).

Findings

The overall finding is that despite prior assumptions that suitability is reliant on product type or country choice, there are a number of sales promotion techniques that are inherently suited to the supermarket industry as a whole. The majority of these “inherently suitable” techniques are price-based and the conclusion is then that these techniques can be used globally. Value-added techniques, on the other hand, should be localised to fit with the market in which they are being applied.

Practical implications

Tools best suited to the grocery product sales environment appear to be price-based or linked to price reductions (i.e. price discounting and discount-linked point-of-purchase (P-O-P) or end-of-aisle (E-O-A) displays combination and volume offers), suggesting that those tools which are inherently suitable to the industry are likely to meet retailers' shorter-term objectives rather than manufacturers' longer-term ones. The difficulty faced by manufacturers, then, is aligning their sales promotion objectives with the tools that are best able to achieve results in the supermarket environment.

Originality/value

Globalisation of the supermarket industry has also meant that marketers continue to need a better understanding of cross-cultural issues and their effect and national culture frameworks can be used to develop marketing theories which are suited to a particular region. The current research identifies preferences for different sales promotion techniques in the two nationally similar, yet ethnically diverse, countries under study, as well as examining application of these techniques in the retail environment.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Adelina Broadbridge

Reports on the results of a questionnaire survey into the perceptions of retailing as a destination career. While some students are attracted to the industry, overall a…

Abstract

Reports on the results of a questionnaire survey into the perceptions of retailing as a destination career. While some students are attracted to the industry, overall a neutral or negative perception prevails. This is conveyed from a general ignorance as to what a retail management job involves or the variety of career opportunities it provides. Often, students have only their experiences as consumers or as part‐time employees in forming their perception of it as a future career. Personal, and word of mouth, work experience can help either to persuade or to dissuade the perceptions of retailing as a destination career. Reports on the work of various bodies such as BIR, CORTCO and CRU in fostering the partnership between industry and educational providers in order to raise the image of retailing as a graduate career. Also provides recommendations on how to raise the profile of the industry.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Brenda Sternquist and Byoungho Jin

The Korean government has played an important role in the development of the domestic retailing industry. Korean manufacturers were nurtured until they were able to…

Abstract

The Korean government has played an important role in the development of the domestic retailing industry. Korean manufacturers were nurtured until they were able to compete with manufacturers throughout the world. Korean retailers are now caught in the domestic market between the powerful Korean manufacturers and foreign retail competitors who have themselves learned to be competitive by going head to head with world‐class retailers. Manufacturers, rather than retailers, have dominated the Korean distribution industry. Korean retailing is characterized by large department stores owned by the chaebols, and small, inefficient family‐centered operations. In contrast to the department store’s decline in sales, the growth of discount stores is the strongest trend in Korean retailing. The government has chosen the manufacturing sector for aggressive development. The result has been a world competitive, export intensive manufacturing sector and a weak, inefficient retail sector. We use state as strategist in retailing (SSR) model to explain how dimensions and stages of government involvement affect retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Anna Watson, David A. Kirby and John Egan

Franchising has shown considerable growth in recent years and in advanced economies, such as the USA and the UK, and currently accounts for approximately one‐third of all…

Abstract

Franchising has shown considerable growth in recent years and in advanced economies, such as the USA and the UK, and currently accounts for approximately one‐third of all retail sales. It would seem, therefore, that franchising and retailing represent a fruitful partnership, though there has been little research as to why this should be. In this article the authors seek to address this situation by considering those characteristics that make retailing particularly suitable for franchising, through an examination of the UK context. Given the changing nature of the retail industry and the advent, in particular, of e‐commerce, consideration is given to the future for retail development through franchising.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 48000