Search results

1 – 10 of over 30000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Aaron D. Arndt, Juliet F. Poujol and Béatrice Siadou-Martin

The customer retail experience is frequently interrupted by disturbances such as ringing phones and other people. Employees must be able to respond to retail disturbances…

Abstract

Purpose

The customer retail experience is frequently interrupted by disturbances such as ringing phones and other people. Employees must be able to respond to retail disturbances effectively to ensure that customers have a satisfactory experience in the retailer. Using Affective Events Theory as a framework, the purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model for understanding how retail disturbances affect customers outcomes and how retail employee response mitigates the negative impact of retail disturbances.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using a pre-study of retail managers and consumers, a survey study and four experimental studies.

Findings

Retail disturbances reduce interactional justice and customer positive emotions. Customers pay attention to how employees address retail disturbances, even when they are not directly involved.

Research limitations/implications

The research experiments focus on sound-based disturbances. Other stimuli (e.g. olfactory or visual) should be examined in more detail.

Practical implications

Employees can mitigate the negative effects of retail disturbances on customers with a positive response to the disturbance and to customers. Employee responses influence customers currently receiving service and nearby shoppers.

Social implications

The findings demonstrate the deleterious effect of solicitation calls on small retailers and provide recommendations for reducing solicitation calls.

Originality/value

This research shows that retail disturbances reduce customer outcomes, employee response becomes part of the disturbance event, and that it is possible for employees to address a group of nearby customers indirectly through unintentional observation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Te‐Lin Chung, Brian Rutherford and Jungkun Park

This study aims to examine the multi‐faceted job satisfaction of retail employees. In addition, it seeks to investigate the moderating effect of gender on the relations…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the multi‐faceted job satisfaction of retail employees. In addition, it seeks to investigate the moderating effect of gender on the relations between proposed antecedents and multifaceted job satisfaction. The seven facets of job satisfaction include satisfaction with supervision, overall job satisfaction, company policy and support, promotion, pay, co‐workers, and customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study constitute a subset of a larger study examining salespeople from both business‐to‐business (B‐T‐B) and retail sales contexts in the USA. A total of 352 usable responses from retail employees were retained. Hypothesized relationships were tested by multiple regression analyses, Chow equality tests, and hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

The study suggests that perceived organizational support, role ambiguity, and emotional exhaustion are the most influential factors for most facets of retail employees' job satisfaction. Role conflict and work‐family conflict only predict satisfaction with promotion, and family‐work conflict does not predict any facets of job satisfaction. Gender differences only played a part in satisfaction with customers. All other variables, such as perceived organizational support, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and emotional exhaustion affect male and female employees differently.

Practical implications

The study provides managerial implications, suggesting that there is no one perfect policy to satisfy retail employees in all aspects and retailers should be more careful in assigning tasks to employees.

Originality/value

The literature concerning multifaceted job satisfaction has contributed significantly to understanding sales personnel job satisfaction. However, as many of the job characteristics for B‐T‐B and retail are different, a separate examination of factors influencing retail employees' job satisfaction is necessary. This study extends the current literature examining the job satisfaction of retail employees by borrowing from retail literature concerning global job satisfaction and from sales management literature about multifaceted job satisfaction.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ainsworth A. Bailey

One area of concern for retailers is the impact of employee theft on retailing profit margins and operations. It is possible that the application of the theory of planned…

Abstract

Purpose

One area of concern for retailers is the impact of employee theft on retailing profit margins and operations. It is possible that the application of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to the employee theft could shine some light on the problem and possibly offer some assistance to retailers. The purpose of this paper is to apply TPB to this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

A model and series of propositions are developed. The propositions are open to empirical verification and can form the basis for a research stream on retail employee theft.

Findings

The model incorporates certain individual difference factors that are likely to influence intentions to engage in retail theft. The model proposes that variables such as organizational commitment and an employee's moral norm are likely to have an impact on retail theft.

Research limitations/implications

The propositions stemming from the model have to be tested empirically. The model incorporates certain individual difference factors that are likely to influence intentions to engage in retail theft. There are additional individual and external factors that will have direct and indirect on the variables in the proposed model.

Practical implications

Before efforts can be undertaken to stem employee theft, retail managers need to understand the phenomenon. The application of the TPB to this phenomenon is a step in that direction. It can provide insights to retail management on the nature of employee theft and who is likely to engage in it. In addition, information can be obtained for use in human resources efforts such as pre‐employment screening.

Originality/value

Prior work on retail employee theft has not applied the TPB in an effort to understand the phenomenon. This is an initial effort to do so.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jungkun Park, Jiseon Ahn, Hyowon Hyun and Brian N. Rutherford

In this study, the authors examine the impacts of two facets of retail employees' cognitive support and affective commitment on emotional labor-related outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the authors examine the impacts of two facets of retail employees' cognitive support and affective commitment on emotional labor-related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the study hypotheses, 521 retail service employees participated in the survey. By using the structural equation modeling, the results show that employees' perceived organizational support directly and positively employees' affective organizational commitment and emotional exhaustion.

Findings

By using the structural equation modeling, the results show that employees' perceived organizational support directly and positively influence employees' affective organizational commitment and emotional exhaustion. The extent of employees' affective organizational commitment directly and negatively influences emotional labor and exhaustion. Furthermore, employees' emotional exhaustion exerts an influence on retail employees' propensity to leave.

Research limitations/implications

Drawing on social exchange and conservation of resources theories, this study contributes to emotional labor research and practices by examining factors that potentially influences employees' propensity to leave. For future studies, researchers can expand the proposed framework of the current study to other retailing settings.

Practical implications

Findings of the study suggest that retail organizations need to manage employees' support and commitment concerning to understand emotional labor.

Originality/value

The current study found that employees' affective commitment influences key emotional labor constructs including emotional labor and emotional exhaustion. Employees who have a high level of identification, involvement and emotional attachment toward the organization, they are less likely to feel of overload and inefficiency. Given the importance of emotional labor in the retailing setting, the proposed model and findings of this study contribute the existing knowledge of retail employees' behavior.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Pallavi Pandey, Saumya Singh and Pramod Pathak

Research investigating turnover intention among frontline employees in the Indian retail industry is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting…

Abstract

Purpose

Research investigating turnover intention among frontline employees in the Indian retail industry is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting withdrawal cognitions among front-end retail employees in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the factors responsible for developing turnover intentions among the front-end employees. Data were analyzed using the ground theory approach.

Findings

Qualitative investigation revealed nine factors (abusive supervision, favoritism, perceived job image, insufficient pay, work exhaustion, perceived unethical climate, organization culture shock, staff shortage and job dissatisfaction) are responsible for developing turnover intention among front-end employees in the Indian retail industry.

Originality/value

The study uncovers antecedents of turnover intention among front-end employees in the relatively neglected Indian retail sector through a qualitative technique. Theoretical contributions, managerial implications, limitations and direction for future research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Wantao Yu and Ramakrishnan Ramanathan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between employee competencies, information technology (IT) applications, operations strategy, and business

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between employee competencies, information technology (IT) applications, operations strategy, and business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the resource‐based theory, this study employs a path analytic framework to investigate how employee competencies and IT applications influence the development of competitive operations strategies and business performance for a sample of retail firms in China.

Findings

The findings indicate significant and positive relationships between employee competencies and operations strategy (e.g. low cost, quality and flexibility). IT applications also play a vital role in helping retailers pursue a flexibility strategy. The operations strategies of low cost and flexibility in turn influence business performance.

Originality/value

This study seems to be the first in investigating the impacts of employee competencies and IT applications on operations strategy and performance in the service sector, especially in the Chinese context.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Arto Lindblom, Sami Kajalo and Lasse Mitronen

In today’s retail environment, retailers’ leadership skills can make the difference between the success and failure of their retail stores. Despite the acknowledgment that…

Abstract

Purpose

In today’s retail environment, retailers’ leadership skills can make the difference between the success and failure of their retail stores. Despite the acknowledgment that retailers’ leadership skills and behaviour are important, treatment of the topic within the retail marketing and management literatures is still very limited. Against this backdrop, this paper aims to focus on the relationship between the retailers’ charismatic leadership and frontline employee outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purpose of this study, the authors develop hypotheses about the influence of the retailers’ charismatic leadership on frontline employee job satisfaction, self-efficacy, organizational identification and turnover intentions. Using structural equation modelling, hypotheses are tested using a sample of 208 frontline employees from the Finnish retail industry.

Findings

As a first main contribution, the findings of this study indicate that charismatic leadership has a very strong positive impact on job satisfaction. As a second contribution, this study shows that there is strong positive link between charismatic leadership and the self-efficacy of frontline employees. As a third contribution, this study indicates that charismatic leadership is positively related to organizational identification. And finally, this study indicates that charismatic leadership has a very strong negative impact on employee turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to retail management and services marketing literature by broadening the current understanding of the leadership behaviour of retailers and its effectiveness and demonstrating how frontline employees respond to charismatic leadership in the retail setting.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jessica L. Hurst and Linda K. Good

The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of Generation Y and to present new insights regarding Gen Y's retail career expectations, perceptions of retail careers, future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of retail careers, and career exploration of the US retailing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing quantitative research methods via an on‐line survey, the authors examined 193 Gen Y college seniors' retail career perceptions and expectations, and explored the influence these factors have on future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of employer‐employee obligations and retail career exploration from nine US universities.

Findings

College seniors' pre‐entry retail job expectations, perceptions of retail careers, and future psychological contract/entitlement perceptions of employee obligations were significant predictors of career exploration; college seniors' preconceived notions of retail careers, combined with what they feel they would owe their future employer, are instrumental in determining retail career exploration decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest directions for university faculty, academic advisors, and industry practitioners on facilitating college seniors' transitions from higher education to the world of work by suggesting recruitment strategies that can attract, retain and motivate Gen Y.

Originality/value

The findings provide useful criteria for organizational development strategies to assist with the transition from higher education to the workforce and may also improve the success of recruiting Gen Y employees. In addition, the conceptualization of psychological contracts (i.e. entitlement perceptions) differentiates this study from prior psychological contract research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Mark S. Rosenbaum, Gianfranco Walsh and Richard Wozniak

Researchers have explored the extent to which consumers belonging to minority, ethnic, marginalized, and sub‐cultural groups experience discrimination in retail settings…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have explored the extent to which consumers belonging to minority, ethnic, marginalized, and sub‐cultural groups experience discrimination in retail settings. This study aims to explore the converse of retail racism – namely, reverse retail discrimination. The work shows that gay men in the USA and Turkish people in Germany often secure relational benefits, or “family allowances,” from like employees, for no reason other than that they share a socio‐collective trait.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs grounded theory methodology to put forth a framework regarding five types of family allowances. The framework emerges from two in‐depth interview studies conducted with gay and Turkish people. A third qualitative study reveals insights into how majority groups view family allowances.

Findings

This study reveals that consumers who share ethnic and sexual orientation traits with like employees obtain family allowances; these are complementary products, monetary discounts, service improvements, customer comfort, and the sharing of information. The study also reveals that consumers from majority groups realize that reverse retail discrimination exists; however, they react negatively to having their thoughts confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that respondents were gay men and Turkish people. Studies are needed to further develop understanding of reverse retail discrimination and to investigate the extent to which managers realize that this phenomenon occurs.

Practical implications

Managers should realize that the potential for reverse discrimination exists and that discriminatory victims may become discriminatory agents.

Originality/value

This study develops the concept of family allowances. In addition, the study expands knowledge regarding a new type of marketplace discrimination.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jennifer Yurchisin and Mary Lynn Damhorst

The purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship that exists, if any, between employee appearance and organizational identification in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship that exists, if any, between employee appearance and organizational identification in the context of apparel retail stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Salespeople from a variety of apparel retail stores were interviewed using a semi‐structured technique.

Findings

Salespeople's level of identification was related to the congruency they perceived to exist between their identity and store's identity. Those who identified with their employment organization felt uncomfortable when the apparel items they wore to work were inconsistent with the store's identity. Additionally, those who identified with their employment organization did not feel uncomfortable wearing apparel items from that store to engage in activities outside of work.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the body of literature on employee‐organization identification by providing evidence of a relationship between appearance and identification. Future research is needed to examine the relationship with a random sample of employees from additional employment contexts.

Practical implications

Participants indicated that their level of identification was positively related to their level of job satisfaction, which in turn was negatively related to their intention to leave. Apparel retail store managers may be able to use appearance‐related factors to select employment candidates who will most likely experience identification with the apparel retail store. Furthermore, potential apparel retail salespeople should be encouraged to consider image congruency when applying for employment.

Originality/value

In this study, a first effort was made to investigate the previously hypothesized relationship between employee appearance and employee‐organization identification.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 30000