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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Balkrushna Potdar, Tony Garry, John Guthrie and Juergen Gnoth

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke guardianship behaviors that manifest in shoplifting prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a phenomenological approach conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews with 26 shop-floor employees of two major national supermarket chains in New Zealand.

Findings

The findings suggest that interactional justice in the workplace is important in shaping organizational commitment amongst employees. Additionally, heightened organizational commitment may have a significant effect on employee propensity to engage in shoplifting prevention/guardianship behavior. A conceptual model is developed based on these findings.

Practical implications

Retail managers may promote and exercise interactional justice practices with employees to improve their organizational commitment and consequential shoplifting prevention/guardianship behaviors.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, and from a theoretical perspective, it offers both a conceptual foundation and empirical-based evaluation of interactional justice and its effect on organizational commitment and, specifically, on guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Second, and from a pragmatic perspective, the conceptual model derived from this research may assist retailers in developing interactional justice strategies that encourage organizational commitment of employees that consequently leads to employees’ guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Finally, it explores significance and role of employee perceptions of interactional justice, employee workplace attachment and organizational commitment within the context of retail crime prevention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Balkrushna Potdar, John Guthrie, Juergen Gnoth and Tony Garry

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly considered a central tenant of marketing strategy and a source of competitive advantage within the retail sector. As…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly considered a central tenant of marketing strategy and a source of competitive advantage within the retail sector. As such, it may affect a supermarket’s customer, employee, and other stakeholder attitudes and behaviours. This research explores how a supermarket’s involvement in CSR activities may influence employee engagement and how this may manifest itself in positive employee behaviours. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the role of CSR and its impact on employee engagement and consequently, employee propensity to exhibit intervention behaviours to prevent in-store retail crime.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a phenomenological approach through semi-structured in-depth interviews with shop-floor employees of a national supermarket chain.

Findings

Findings suggest that external and internal CSR practices of supermarkets are important in shaping organisational engagement behaviours among employees. Additionally, heightened employee engagement may have a significant impact on employee propensity to engage in shoplifting prevention behaviours. A conceptual model is developed based on these findings.

Practical implications

Retail managers should fully communicate CSR practices to employees to increase employee engagement and consequential shoplifting intervention prevention behaviours.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is twofold. First and from a theoretical perspective, it offers both a conceptual foundation and empirical-based evaluation of CSR and its impact on employee engagement and specifically, shoplifting prevention behaviours. Second and from a pragmatic perspective, the conceptual model derived from this research may aid retailers in developing and communicating CSR strategies that engage employees and consequently lead to shoplifting prevention behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Balkrushna Potdar, John Guthrie and Juergen Gnoth

The cost to supermarkets from shoplifting is a growing problem. Despite huge investments in formal security measures, supermarkets experience shrinkage and face heavy…

Abstract

Purpose

The cost to supermarkets from shoplifting is a growing problem. Despite huge investments in formal security measures, supermarkets experience shrinkage and face heavy financial losses. Hence, this paper explores an alternative approach to shoplifting prevention. The purpose of this paper is to propose that quality relationships between a supermarket and its customers could be a viable strategy for shoplifting prevention. A conceptual model is presented at the end of this paper for encouraging shoplifting prevention using a theory of planned behaviour perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search of literature on relationship quality was conducted. Research papers were shortlisted from peer-reviewed journals published between 2007 and 2016. For the convenience of readers, studies on relationship quality are presented in six cross-checked information categories in a table.

Findings

This study produced two results. First, it finds three antecedents of supermarket-customer relationship quality. These are as follows: a supermarket’s participation in corporate social responsibility and cause-related marketing initiatives, a supermarket’s service quality, and a customer’s attachment to a supermarket’s place/location. Second, there are three major effective dimensions of relationship quality. These are as follows: satisfaction, trust, and commitment. The proposed model incorporates factors from both findings, to measure a supermarket-customer relationship quality that may influence intention of customers to engage in shoplifting preventive behaviour.

Originality/value

This research paper has reviewed the existing literature to utilise it in the context of shoplifting prevention, and developed a novel model/framework for effective shoplifting prevention with a theory of planned behaviour perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

John Burrows

The aim of this paper is to emphasise the pivotal role that information systems, of various kinds, play in both identifying fraud committed against the medium to larger…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to emphasise the pivotal role that information systems, of various kinds, play in both identifying fraud committed against the medium to larger retail concern and in investigating who has been responsible. Reliable statistics on retail fraud are difficult to come by, but the paper summarises some of the information available from Government, police and retail sources and the arguments for exercising rigorous control. It then goes on to examine some of the prerequisites if information systems are to combat fraud effectively. Attention is focused on the sales audit, stock audit and security functions, and examples of applications in each of these fields are provided.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Chioma Vivian Amasiatu and Mahmood Hussain Shah

First-party fraud in which retail consumers commit fraud against retailers is a growing problem. However, to date studies on retail crime have focused almost entirely on…

Abstract

Purpose

First-party fraud in which retail consumers commit fraud against retailers is a growing problem. However, to date studies on retail crime have focused almost entirely on fraudulent consumer behaviours in physical stores. With the growth of e-commerce, the losses to retailers from this fraud are growing so there is strong need to research this problem from multiple perspectives. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted three case studies and a total of 24 semi-structured interviews with retail managers, and evaluated their existing prevention-related documentation. Fraud management lifecycle theory was used to organise and discuss the findings.

Findings

The authors found that many retailers are treating this problem as just a cost of doing business online and have no detailed plans for dealing with this problem or any reporting to law enforcement agencies. However, they have begun working with delivery companies for delivery accuracy. Use of convenience stores as collection points is also showing early improvements.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of cases and interviews used is a limitation of this study. However, the authors believe that the findings are useful for advancing knowledge in this emerging research area.

Practical implications

This study provides insight into existing management practices in this domain, and makes recommendations on how to improve the management of first-party fraud. The study also makes a case for increased managerial interest and involvement in reducing first-party fraud. The study also helps bridge a glaring gap in existing literature and provides useful leads for further research.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the existing practices employed to manage first-party fraud in e-retail.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Balkrushna Potdar, Tony Garry, Juergen Gnoth and John Guthrie

This study aims to provide empirically generated insights into the drivers of guardianship behaviour among frontline service employees (FLEs) within retail settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirically generated insights into the drivers of guardianship behaviour among frontline service employees (FLEs) within retail settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research framework comprises a quantitative survey of 507 frontline service employees at national supermarkets within New Zealand.

Findings

The findings of the survey suggest that service employee perceptions of internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities, their level of psychological ownership towards the supermarket and personal moral beliefs, shape their guardianship behaviours and, consequentially, the prevention of in-store deviant behaviours by customers such as shoplifting.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, it offers both a conceptual foundation and an empirical-based evaluation of the antecedents and role of guardianship behaviour among frontline service employees. Second, the conceptual model derived from this research may aid practitioners in developing strategies that engender guardianship behaviours in their employees within service contexts.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Adewumi Badiora and Oyinloluwa B. Adebara

The purpose of this paper is to examine realtors and residents’ perceptions of the effectiveness of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) in reducing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine realtors and residents’ perceptions of the effectiveness of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) in reducing night-time and daytime break-ins in residential estate.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted case study methods. Two residential estates (one at inner and the other at outer city) were selected as cases of the study. Data were collected from two sets of respondents: realtors and tenants. In the realtors’ cluster, all real estate and property development companies were sampled since the population is very small. Systematic sampling technique was used to select residents. Respondents were asked to answer closed-ended questions on socio-economic and demographic characteristics, perception of property crime, spending on CPTED and effectiveness of CPTED. Data were analyzed using the descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

Findings disclose that more than half of the residents of inner and outer city had been victims of housebreaks and these incidences are expected to increase in the nearest future. To reduce break-ins, findings show that realtors and residents have spent on both formal and informal surveillance with emphasis on ensuring visual control over premises. Furthermore, respondents confirm the effectiveness of CPTED in deterring break-ins. The study establishes variation in the realtors and tenants’ perception of break-ins as spending on CPTED strategies vary between them, with locations and types of properties.

Practical implications

Social and human factors remain very important as far as the prevention of break-ins is concerned. These should be taken into considerations when improving CPTED approach in the future. Besides, adequate attentions should be given to daytime break-in. Nonetheless, night-time break-ins should not be neglected. Furthermore, the study emphasizes the importance of visible, clean and well-lit premises as ways of reducing break-ins. It is therefore suggested that residential properties should be well lit at nights, while CCTV and security personnel be positioned in strategic places and within security viewing range so as to send fast alerts to the nearest police stations in the cases of break-in(s).

Originality/value

Very few studies on effectiveness of CPTED have mainly concentrated on how CPTED works in residential estates. No study till date, have explored how realtors perceive CPTED in preventing break-ins. Besides, this study contributes to existing literature having revealed variation in the realtors and tenants’ spending on CPTED on the basis of property location and types of residential properties.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Alan Elder

Most people connected with the retail industry are now well aware that huge sums of money are lost to shop theft, euphemistically covered by the term “shrinkage”, each…

Abstract

Most people connected with the retail industry are now well aware that huge sums of money are lost to shop theft, euphemistically covered by the term “shrinkage”, each year. Government reports and articles (eg Bamfield 1988, Burrows 1988) have put forward various estimates of the extent of these losses. The general consensus is that shrinkage accounts for between 1% and 2% of retail turnover each year. But what exactly does this mean? Who is responsible for these losses? Where and why do they occur? And what can retailers do to reduce their losses? These are some of the questions which a recent report, commissioned by Halfords and carried out by Alan Elder of the Institute of Retail Studies, attempted to answer.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Shelley Tickell

The purpose of this paper is to explore eighteenth‐century London retailers' attitudes to shoplifting and their strategies for countering customer theft.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore eighteenth‐century London retailers' attitudes to shoplifting and their strategies for countering customer theft.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an examination of contemporary documentary evidence, in particular a quantitative and qualitative analysis of shopkeeper practice drawn from trial transcripts of shoplifting prosecutions at London's highest criminal court, the Old Bailey.

Findings

The paper reveals that shopkeepers predominantly invested in preventative measures to control customer theft, rather than relying on prosecution. It demonstrates that improved shop fittings and new marketing methods served to reinforce the effectiveness of this strategy. The techniques that retailers employed are shown to directly reflect the nature and location of the risks they experienced, even to the extent of being a contributory factor in the withdrawal of women from the retail sector during this period.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a sample of London trials and the experiences of retailers who prosecuted.

Originality/value

This is the first study of shoplifting prevention in this period. It analyses retailer practice and illustrates how this interacted with their perception of the prevalence of criminality, demonstrating that their approach to stock protection anticipated that of modern retailers. It complements existing scholarship on eighteenth‐century retailing and marketing.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Mike Pretious, Robert Stewart and David Logan

Outlines preliminary results from a survey into retail securitymethods employed by retailers in central Dundee, and forms part ofongoing research into retail crime in this…

Abstract

Outlines preliminary results from a survey into retail security methods employed by retailers in central Dundee, and forms part of ongoing research into retail crime in this city being undertaken on a joint basis by the University of Abertay Dundee, and Tayside Police. Considers it to be the first survey of this type undertaken at such a local level in the UK. Concentrates on the types of physical and procedural security method employed, their perceived effectiveness from a managerial viewpoint, and which of the alternative security methods retail managers would utilize if they were given a free choice by their employers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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