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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Maria Björklund and Helena Forslund

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service providers (LSPs), and to develop a classification model that allows for a description of the various shades of green within companies.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out a multiple case study of four retail chains with a green image operating in the Swedish market, collecting empirical data from the retail chains’ sustainability reports and home pages and conducting interviews with logistics, transportation and supply chain managers.

Findings

Based on the literature, we developed a classification model for judging green image, green logistics actions, green measurements and green contracts. The model is used to illustrate the different shades of green found within the respective retail chains. A green image seems well-aligned with green logistics actions. However, there are more levels to judge, and the measurement systems are not sufficiently developed to track green logistics actions. Contract handling is more developed among retail chains than measurements, which is positive, as this is a way of ensuring that LSPs are involved. In our classification model, greenwashing can be judged in a more nuanced way, delving deeper under the surface.

Research limitations/implications

The provided classification model adds to our knowledge and illustrates the alignment within companies’ sustainable logistics. The robustness of the model can be strengthened by applying it to a larger number of cases and by continually validating its content and evaluation criteria.

Practical implications

The study’s main practical contribution is the classification model, which may potentially serve as a method for managers to easily judge the green alignment of a retail chain’s logistics.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies capture how retail chains measure environmental logistics performance, and even fewer concern contracts stipulating the environmental demands placed on LSPs.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Emmelie Gustafsson, Patrik Jonsson and Jan Holmström

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer…

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1033

Abstract

Purpose

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer physically fitting products. Digital product fitting is an emerging operational practice in retail that uses digital models of products and customers to match product supply to customer requirements. This paper aims to explore potential supply chain outcomes of digitalizing the operational practice of product fitting. The purpose is to explore and propose the potential of the practice to improve responsiveness to customer requirements and the utilization of existing variety in mass-produced products.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model of product fitting is developed to specify three levels of digitalization and potential outcomes for each level. Potential outcomes are developed based on empirical data from a case survey of three technology-developing companies, 13 retail cases and a review of academic literature.

Findings

With increasing maturity of digital product fitting, the practice can be used for more purposes. Besides matching product supply to customer demand, the practice can improve material flows, customer relationship management, assortment planning and product development. The practice of digital product fitting is most relevant for products where the final product configuration is difficult to make to order, product and customer attributes are easily measurable and tacit knowledge of customers and products can be formalized using digital modeling.

Research limitations/implications

Potential outcomes are conceptualized and proposed. Further research is needed to observe actual outcomes and understand the mechanisms for both proposed and surprising outcomes in specific contexts.

Practical implications

The maturity model helps companies assess how their operations can benefit from digital product fitting and the efforts required to achieve beneficial outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to describe the potential outcomes of introducing digital product fitting in retail supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2011

Thomas Reardon and Bart Minten

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the patterns and dynamics of the diffusion of modern food retail in India.

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2930

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the patterns and dynamics of the diffusion of modern food retail in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on detailed sales data from retail chains in India, short case studies of retail chains, and review of literature.

Findings

The article presents three surprises concerning modern food retail diffusion in India. First, modern retail has developed in three “waves”, with the first wave, government retail chains, starting in the 1960s/1970s, cooperative retail chains starting in the 1970s/1980s, and private retail chains in the 1990s/2000s. All three were substantial, and internationally uniquely, all three coexist in the 2000s as segments of modern retail. Second, the rise of modern private retail in India in the past six years has been among the fastest in the world, growing at 49 percent a year on average over that period, and bouncing back to growth after a dip from the recent recession. The great majority of modern private retail has arisen in 2007‐2010. Third, beside the uniqueness of the coexistence of three types of retail noted above, Indian private retail chain development has unique or rare characteristics: driven by domestic capital investment, “early” (in terms of usual international patterns) diversification into small formats, “early” penetration of small cities and even rural towns, of the food markets of the poor and lower‐middle class, and of fresh produce retail. These unique factors have helped to propel it quickly.

Originality/value

For the first time in the literature, the paper presents an analysis of: the three waves in Indian retail; detailed sales data for all leading chains; and its uniqueness.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Rozenn Perrigot

This paper aims to review the differences between retailing and services in the particular context of franchised chains in order to highlight the main differences between…

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2668

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the differences between retailing and services in the particular context of franchised chains in order to highlight the main differences between retail chains and services chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The existence of such differences is tested in the French context because its franchising sector is the most developed one in Europe as far as the number of chains is concerned. The empirical study deals with 530 chains among which 228 are services and 302 are retail.

Findings

Some significant differences between services and retail chains are underlined in terms of age, plural form, franchising fees, franchising and advertising royalties, and contract length. Additionally to these significant differences, the new trend in franchising seems to consist in developing more services chains than retail chains.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has some limitations. The focus is on only one country: France. A multi‐countries study could be useful to confirm these differences or highlight other ones. Furthermore, a more precise classification about the sectors of activities could underline other differences.

Practical implications

This paper can help the prospective franchisee to better differentiate the services chains and the retail ones, and better understand their particular features. Furthermore, the new franchisor can use these descriptive results to compare his/her practices with the average practices within the sector he/she is in, above all in terms of contract terms: franchising fees, franchising and advertising royalties, and contract duration.

Originality/value

This paper highlights differences between different kinds of franchised chains: retail vs services. These differences have not been underlined in previous research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Aradhana Vikas Gandhi, Ateeque Shaikh and Pratima Amol Sheorey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption and implementation of supply chain management practices (SCMPs) on supply chain performance (SCP) and firm…

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3353

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption and implementation of supply chain management practices (SCMPs) on supply chain performance (SCP) and firm performance (FP) in the organized retail industry in a developing country like India.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted on a sample size of 125 responses collected from the supply chain heads of organized retail firms in India. A theoretical model was developed depicting the relationship between SCMPs, SCP and FP. The theoretical model was tested using mediating multiple regression analysis.

Findings

This research suggests that the SCMPs are positively related to SCP and FP. Customer relationship management and supplier relationship management are reported as the most important SCMPs, which had the maximum impact on the FP in the organized retailing context in India.

Research limitations/implications

The research employed perceptual performance measures. Future studies can use actual performance parameters like profit and sales growth to better quantify the benefits of SCM in this context.

Originality/value

This research is an attempt to empirically test the impact of SCMPs on FP in organized retailing context in an emerging market, India.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Veronica S Ülgen and Helena Forslund

The purpose of the paper is to explore the practices with logistics performance management in two textiles supply chains, and to identify the related best practices and…

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3759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the practices with logistics performance management in two textiles supply chains, and to identify the related best practices and barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is a multiple case study of two textiles supply chains with a special focus on the rarely addressed interface between the manufacturer and the retail chain. The retail chains represent one large, global retail chain and one Nordic, comparably smaller retail chain. This paper is primarily empirical and describes practices for logistics performance management. The analysis discusses and explains best practices and barriers for logistics performance managements in textiles supply chains.

Findings

Differences were identified regarding practices, priorities and collaboration in the logistics performance management process. No textiles industry-specific practices were found. A way of exchanging action plans between the actors is an interesting best practice, which enables improvement projects even with long geographical distances. Barriers in the shape of difficulties in creating a collaborative culture were found; however, IT support seems no longer to be a barrier.

Research limitations/implications

Two cases are explored, why a broader study is necessary to confirm the results. The best practices and barriers identified are similar to those known from manufacturing companies.

Practical implications

The detailed descriptions of logistics performance management practices can provide insights for practitioners. Even if the studied supply chains are important for the respective actors, there is a potential for increased effectiveness in textiles supply chains.

Originality/value

Supply chains for textiles products “starting at a manufacturer and ending in a retail chain” seem to be an unchartered territory and not many studies have been performed.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2018

Katarzyna Bilińska-Reformat, Barbara Kucharska, Malgorzata Twardzik and Les Dolega

The purpose of this paper is to recognise the areas of implementation of the principles of sustainable development (SD) in the model of retail chains activity. In the…

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1259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to recognise the areas of implementation of the principles of sustainable development (SD) in the model of retail chains activity. In the paper, the assumption was made that nowadays it is necessary to adopt the rules following SD while making strategic decisions by retail chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses secondary data sources, reports, academic literature and the case study research method. A case study research is a multi-method paradigm based on full range of a scientist’s tool-kit: reviewing literature studies, examining secondary documents and comparing the websites of investigated retail chains.

Findings

According to that business model, the authors were recognising selected components of this model, that is to say: recourses and competences of retail chains and value proposition for their customers. The greatest chances of development will be enjoyed by those retail chains that will be able to provide real value to customers. Maintaining a competitive advantage will require constant improvements in the quality of service and innovative business models connected with sustainable elements.

Research limitations/implications

It seems necessary to develop research tools that allow for identification of the level of use of the SD concept in retail chain’s business models in the future.

Practical implications

The paper is of interest to practitioners and students of retail management.

Social implications

The concept of the SD model included in the retailer business models serves to build value for the customer through the care of his quality of life. The vast majority of retailers believe that it is the responsibility of the business sector to respond to social and environmental challenges.

Originality/value

The paper intends to fill the gap in the literature concerning the influence of SD concept on changes in the business models of retail chains. The SD activities can lead to the development of specific capabilities based on intangible recourses that are sources of competitive advantage (SD). That is the main reason of undertaking this subject.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Helena Forslund

– The purpose of this paper is to explore and generate propositions of factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration in retail supply chains.

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3032

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and generate propositions of factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration in retail supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance management processes of two retail supply chains were explored and their degree of process integration was classified. Differences in the degree of performance management process integration and affecting factors lead to the generation of five propositions.

Findings

Dependence, brand importance, business process integration, performance demand and the existence of a performance management standard seem to be positively related to the degree of performance management process integration in the relation. Both factors that affect process integration in general and performance management process integration specifically are included. Some insights on integration in a vertically integrated retail chain were provided.

Research limitations/implications

This study has specified the knowledge in process integration to the performance management process and expanded it into a retail context. It has generated a number of propositions on factors that affect the degree of performance management process integration, including a factor that was not found in previous research on manufacturing supply chains. The contribution to process integration theory is however limited until the propositions are validated in a broader study.

Practical implications

Knowledge in affecting factors is useful when “performance management managers” need to communicate integration ambitions with other managers within and outside their own company. The detailed descriptions of performance management processes and integration practices can serve as inspiring benchmarks, as in the daily groceries supply chain, where the industry standard is especially interesting. They can also indicate practices to avoid, as in the home textiles supply chain. Another managerial take-away is the need to handle each relation, manufacturer-wholesaler and wholesaler-retailer store, with their specific affecting factors in specific ways.

Originality/value

Previous knowledge on performance management process integration is mainly based on manufacturing companies. This study expands existing knowledge into a retail context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Progress Hove-Sibanda, Marumo Motshidisi and Paul Agu Igwe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the risks, innovations and technological enablers or barriers to the efficiency of the supply chain risk management (SCRM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the risks, innovations and technological enablers or barriers to the efficiency of the supply chain risk management (SCRM) implementation in the retail sector of South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a qualitative research approach by conducting interviews with grocery retail store managers. Through convenience sampling, 12 representatives from 12 stores (1 representative per store was interviewed at each of the 12 stores) were interviewed.

Findings

This study mainly found that most of the grocery retail stores experience late deliveries, damaged stock, theft, high fuel costs and expired stock from their respective suppliers. It was found that firms are faced with similar supply chain risks. In addition, innovations and technologies such as the internet of things (IoT) and social media are making an impact in wider industrial change.

Practical implications

Adaptation of efficient and effective SCRM has had implications for practice related to improvements in the retail stores’ supply chain, the profitability of retail stores, marketing, promotions and consumer experiences.

Originality/value

This study is unique as it provides new insight into variables that affects the quality of service in the retail sector; customer service in the retail sector; innovations and technology help mitigate SCRM experienced in the retail sector from a developing country perspective.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Carmine Sellitto, Stephen Burgess and Paul Hawking

This paper aims to report on research that examined the recent scholarly literature to identify the information quality attributes associated with radio frequency…

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6681

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on research that examined the recent scholarly literature to identify the information quality attributes associated with radio frequency identification (RFID)‐based benefits across sectors of the retail supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflecting the recent interest in RFID technology, the literature review was limited to scholarly articles published since the late 1990s when there appears to have been a surge in research and publishing activity. Moreover, the paper uncouples RFID‐focused technology findings that are a feature of many previous publications and reports on the decision‐making attributes associated with the perceived benefits of adopting the technology.

Findings

Many RFID‐based benefits were found to be associated with the distribution and transportation sectors of the supply chain, however, an emerging number are also apparent in the retail and post retail domains. The improved information value associated with RFID‐derived benefits was embodied in quality attributes that included timeliness, currency, accuracy and completeness. The paper proposes an RFID information value chain that maps benefits and information attributes across the supply chain. The paper is also one of the first that attempts to relate RFID‐derived information with aspects of organisational decision making.

Research limitations/implications

This study identified information attributes associated with RFID adoption within the retail supply chain that have led to enhanced organisational responsiveness through improved decision‐making capabilities. As exploratory research in a nascent and emerging area, this research should be viewed as a starting point in the examination and identification of RFID‐derived benefits and information, rather than a prescriptive and/or definitive type of classification system for RFID.

Practical implications

Practical examples of RFID‐derived benefits distilled from the literature tend to provide important retail supply chain lessons for organisations that are currently piloting or expecting to trial RFID. The study highlights operational and strategic implications of adopting RFID technology discussing them from an information value perspective.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first that examines the information value of RFID‐derived benefits across the organisational supply chain. Moreover, both benefits and information attributes are mapped to specific sectors of the retail and distribution supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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