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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2020

Alex Anlesinya and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

It achieves its aim through conceptual analysis by theorising through the lenses of talent philosophies, the organisational justice theory, the stakeholder theory and extant literature.

Findings

A responsible talent management construct and mode to guide the practice of talent management in a socially responsible way is developed. It argues that inclusivity; corporate responsibility; and equity and equal employment opportunity are the key underlying principles of a responsible talent management system. This study further argues that responsible talent management practices promote achievement of multilevel sustainable outcomes such as decent work, employee well-being and organisational well-being.

Practical implications

Emphasising responsible management and ethical concerns in organisational talent strategies and practices is non-negotiable, given the current level of interest in sustainable work and employment and in the quest to achieve sustainable human and organisational outcomes through management and organisational practices.

Originality/value

The development of a responsible talent management construct and model is original and novel and is expected to shape thinking and drive new research directions in the field of talent management. It further contributes directly to knowledge and practice by demonstrating how organisations can manage their talents in a responsible way.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Mohamed Mousa and Rami M. Ayoubi

The purpose of this paper is to focus on three Egyptian public business schools in an attempt to explore the effect of inclusive/exclusive talent management on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on three Egyptian public business schools in an attempt to explore the effect of inclusive/exclusive talent management on the organizational downsizing of academics and the mediating role of responsible leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 330 academics were contacted and given a set of questionnaires. After three follow-ups, a total of 240 responses were collected with a response rate of 72.73 percent. Multiple regressions were employed to show how much variation in organizational downsizing can be explained by inclusive/exclusive talent management and responsible leadership.

Findings

The findings highlighted a very weak statistical association between academics’ inclusive talent management and organizational downsizing, whereas a strong statistical association has been discovered between exclusive talent management and organizational downsizing. Statistical analysis showed that responsible leadership has no role in mediating the relationship between inclusive/exclusive talent management of academics and their downsizing.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have focused on only three Egyptian public business schools, the matter that may limit opportunities to generalize the results of this study to private business schools and other faculties in Egypt. Future research could use a double source method.

Practical implications

By preparing a set of academic competences, business schools will be able to classify their academic staff into talented and non-talented, and accordingly they can initiate their tailored downsizing strategies. Furthermore, undertaking a responsible strategy of downsizing, which includes and is not limited to justifying the need to decrease academic staff numbers to guarantee post-redundancy care practices for laid-off academics may alleviate many of the negative psychological, societal and economic consequences of downsizing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in HR management and higher education literature, in which empirical studies on the relationship between talent management and academics’ organizational downsizing have been limited until now. This may create better research opportunities for cross-disciplinary papers that should be done by HR, higher education and leadership scholars.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Stephen Swailes

This article addresses three concerns about the operationalization and possible effects of exclusive talent management; the core assumptions that underpin and shape talent

Abstract

Purpose

This article addresses three concerns about the operationalization and possible effects of exclusive talent management; the core assumptions that underpin and shape talent practices, the problem of fair talent identification and potentially adverse employee reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that integrates empirical research on talent and talent management with ideas from business ethics.

Findings

Organizations should not simply assume that they meet the underlying assumptions of talent management. Where the assumptions can reasonably be shown to be valid, then a framework based on a set of principles is suggested to guide organizational approaches towards responsible talent management.

Practical implications

The article provides talent practitioners with a set of principles, or at least some substantive suggestions, to be considered in the design of socially responsible talent management programmes and in programme evaluation.

Social implications

The article provides guidance for organizations wishing to improve the care of their workforce in relation to strategies of employee differentiation based on performance and potential.

Originality/value

Despite the burgeoning literature on talent management, the topic has not received much attention from an ethical and socially responsible viewpoint. This article adds to that literature and suggests further research particularly concerning the existence of real talent differences on which the entire talent management project is based.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Effective management of talent can positively impact on firm performance. A principled approach that included more accurate definition and identification of talent along…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective management of talent can positively impact on firm performance. A principled approach that included more accurate definition and identification of talent along with increased equality and care can help organizations pursue a more ethical approach to the process.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Effective management of talent can positively impact on firm performance. A principled approach that included more accurate definition and identification of talent along with increased equality and care can help organizations pursue a more ethical approach to the process.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Mohamed Mousa and Rami M. Ayoubi

The purpose of this paper is to focus on 3 out of 24 business schools in Egypt in order to investigate their talent management practices of academics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on 3 out of 24 business schools in Egypt in order to investigate their talent management practices of academics.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 350 academics were contacted and 245 of them were interviewed in 49 face-to-face focus groups. The interview length for each focus group is about 45 min and is conducted in Arabic, the mother tongue of all respondents. Upon conducting the interviews, the authors used thematic analysis to determine the main ideas in the transcripts.

Findings

The authors did not detect any systematic approach for the management of academic talent in the chosen public business schools. Instead, there were irresponsible unorderly procedures undertaken by these business schools in staffing, empowering, motivating, evaluating and retaining those talents. Furthermore, the authors realized an absence of many cultural and technical dimensions like adaptability, consistency and knowledge sharing which may hurdle academic staff desires to do their best effort in teaching and conducting research. Moreover, these addressed academic members narrow perception of the concept “talent” that includes only musical and sports figures – the matter that reflects their lack of understanding for one of the hottest concepts in HR academic and practical arenas nowadays.

Research limitations/ implications

The focus is only on a single perspective (academics) and a single area (Upper Egypt) – a matter that neglects a variety of views (e.g. minister of Egyptian higher education and schools’ deans). Additionally, the results/findings of this study cannot be generalized to academic settings in other countries because the data are collected only from public business schools in Upper Egypt.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in HR management, in which empirical studies on the practices of managing talents have been limited so far.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Denise Ewerlin and Stefan Süß

Although talent management is increasingly being discussed by academics and practitioners, there are very few empirical studies to date concerning its dissemination and…

Abstract

Purpose

Although talent management is increasingly being discussed by academics and practitioners, there are very few empirical studies to date concerning its dissemination and configuration in German companies. The purpose of this paper is to reduce this research deficit.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to analyze the (causes of) the dissemination, configuration and influence factors of talent management in Germany, the authors collected data in two survey waves via an online survey. The sample consists of 313 completed questionnaires. The average size of the companies is 25,619 employees (median: 2,000 employees; spread 1-609,000). The authors analyze the data in different steps using a factor analysis, a regression analysis and a cluster analysis.

Findings

The paper provides evidence of the dissemination and configuration of talent management in Germany, as well as the reasons for its introduction in Germany. It also contributes to the (empirical) analysis of talent management and to the study of the dissemination of (human resource) management concepts. The authors find evidence that some companies in Germany have implemented talent management as a facade, while others have done so out of economic necessity.

Originality/value

The analysis represents one of the first scientific studies in German-speaking countries that focusses on talent management configuration, the causes of its dissemination and the characteristics of companies using it. In combination with the current study of Festing et al. (2013) it draws an extensive picture of talent management in Germany.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Jo Hennessy and Claire McCartney

This paper sets out to explore the value of HR in times of change, providing an overview of current organizational change issues and against this backdrop exploring…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the value of HR in times of change, providing an overview of current organizational change issues and against this backdrop exploring perceptions and requirements of the HR function. It also seeks to look at the important role that HR can play in taking the lead in talent management activities that can help to secure future organizational sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through Roffey Park's annual The Management Agenda survey, which encompasses a sample of 500 UK managers across a wide range of sectors, organizational sizes and national/international structures. Further organizational data was collected for two case studies; the latter case study on talent management was taken from The Talent Management Journey.

Findings

The paper offers a number of practical recommendations for HR professionals. These include that HR needs to be flexible to both changing business and people requirements; focus attention on customer needs and delivering value; and work in partnership with various stakeholders to ensure successful talent management processes.

Originality/value

The paper is based on original Roffey Park research, both The Management Agenda survey, now in its 11th year, and Roffey Park's The Talent Management Journey research guide. It translates the research findings into practical implications for HR professionals and organizations in times of change.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Andrew Bratton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of strategic talent development in supporting environmental management in the hospitality sector, as well as exploring its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of strategic talent development in supporting environmental management in the hospitality sector, as well as exploring its practical implications.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines a single public sector case study in the hospitality industry, a National Health Service conference centre. This case is part of a larger study in which qualitative and quantitative data were collected in six public and private sector workplaces in Scotland.

Findings

The findings emphasise the key role of leaders as change agents, and in promoting sustainability and encouraging workplace low-carbon behaviours. The findings demonstrate that an inclusive approach to talent development can play a key role in creating a pro-environmental culture and can significantly contribute to the long-term environmental sustainability of organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The scale of the research is limited to one public sector case study and restricted to the Scottish hospitality industry. Extending the research to multiple case studies in both the public and private sector in Scotland would be useful.

Practical implications

This paper makes recommendations about the role of line managers, blended learning strategies, organisational culture and employee participation in supporting workplace learning for sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper examines the role of strategic talent development in supporting environmental sustainability in the hospitality industry and provides unique insight for both academics and practitioners into a single public sector case study.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review talent management research in Africa with the aim of developing a multilevel talent management model and defining future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review is performed utilising studies published on the topic from 2008 to 2019 in various research databases.

Findings

The findings highlighted various talent management contributions and challenges in the African context. They further revealed major issues with the nature of research method adopted in talent management research in Africa. Moreover, contextually, apart from Southern Africa sub-region, talent management research is highly under-researched in the North African, West African and Eastern African sub-regions of the continent. Therefore, talent management research in Africa can be described as being at an embryonic stage.

Practical implications

Effective talent management has significant transformative and growth power through its varied positive contributions. Talent management in Africa is faced with numerous organisational and macro-level challenges and requires attention from relevant stakeholders, if African talents are to be harnessed to facilitate the development of the continent.

Originality/value

This systematic review on talent management is the first of its kind focusing solely on Africa. Also, this study contributes further evidence by proposing a multilevel talent management model based on the synthesised evidence since multilevel research in the field of talent management is very limited.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Alex Anlesinya, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Philip Kofi Adom, Obi Berko Obeng Damoah and Kwasi Dartey-Baah

There is a paucity of research on the causal relationships between talent management (TM), decent work and national well-being. Hence, this study examines the nexus…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of research on the causal relationships between talent management (TM), decent work and national well-being. Hence, this study examines the nexus between macro talent management (MTM) practices, decent work and national well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed longitudinal data from 77 developing countries across the globe and also utilised panel data estimators and the bootstrapping mediation method for the analyses.

Findings

The results indicated that macro-level TM strategies can have a positive impact on decent work. Decent work also significantly improves national well-being (both subjective and economic well-being) over time as it shows a significant positive impact on change in national well-being measures. Furthermore, decent work serves as a mechanism that links MTM to improved national well-being at the macro level.

Practical implications

TM investments by governments can empower citizens to escape the tragedy of vulnerable and low-quality employment and well-being deficit as it has the potential to improve decent work and national well-being as enshrined in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Originality/value

Beyond the myopic organisational and managerialist view, the authors show that TM can have a positive spillover impact on people and the general society across time by enhancing decent work opportunities to improve both subjective and economic well-being of citizens in a country. Additionally, because decent work has psychosocial and economic dimensions, this study has revealed a complex and compelling conduit for translating the gains of macro-level TM strategies to improve national well-being. Moreover, it provides original empirical evidence to expand the limited longitudinal TM literature. Lastly, it adds to knowledge in the developing countries' context.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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