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Article

Aneeq Inam, Jo Ann Ho, Siew Imm Ng and Rosmah Mohamed

Leadership styles appear to influence unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB), but there has been little empirical research on employees' ethical behavior as an…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership styles appear to influence unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB), but there has been little empirical research on employees' ethical behavior as an outcome of responsible leadership. This study examines the positive effect of responsible leadership on unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB) via the mediator, leader–member exchange (LMX).

Design/methodology/approach

Responses from 200 full-time working employees in Pakistan were collected in two waves, and structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that LMX mediated the relationship between responsible leadership and UPB. Our research also yielded a negative relationship between responsible leadership and employees' willingness to engage in UPB and between LMX and UPB. In addition, the mediation and direct relationship results were stronger for employees who spent more than seven years in the organization as compared to those with less than seven years.

Research limitations/implications

The leader's responsible behavior trickles down to the subordinates and encourages their employees to behave responsibly too. We also showed that responsible leadership influenced employees’ UPB engagement through LMX.

Practical implications

By adopting a responsible leadership style through training practices and appraisal tools, organizations may increase quality exchange relationship between leader and subordinates, which will reduce UPB.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few empirical studies which have examined the relationship between responsible leadership, LMX and UPB. The results from our study help to enhance findings from earlier studies on the antecedents of UPB. Contrary to previous studies, our study also shows that LMX can lead to ethical behavior i.e. reduce UPB.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article

Paul Pounder

The purpose of this paper is to explore responsible leadership and crisis management. Many sectors and economies have faced the stark effect of coronavirus; however, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore responsible leadership and crisis management. Many sectors and economies have faced the stark effect of coronavirus; however, the damage done was felt more in some areas than others. Cruise tourism is one such sector dramatically affected, as it ground to a screeching halt in March 2020. This has led to crisis management, as passengers, cruise-line crew, large cruise companies and governments were now faced with a new reality as countries around the world closed their borders. This article aims at discussing in detail how responsible leadership, in the small island of Barbados, championed a response to support the cruise tourism sector and assist in managing the crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted a literature review on the current knowledge relating leadership and crisis management. Thus building a better understanding in the field and identifying gaps for making new arguments for best practices of leadership development in crisis management established in the cruise tourism sector. The author gave viewpoints based on the leadership style of the Prime Minister of Barbados.

Findings

Responsible leadership is a style that has been best observed as one that emphasizes a commitment to the common good and provides a constructive societal impact. With this approach, the leaders navigated the uncertainty surrounding the crisis and provided fresh hope to future plans. Thus, the coronavirus was perceived in a positive way, producing opportunities for progress and change.

Research limitations/implications

By developing an understanding of traditional leadership theories, it provides a framework for the adaptation of responsible leadership approach in crisis management. Moreover, the practice of responsible leadership in this COVID-19 era is shown to be crucial to crisis management and enhancing performance. Limitations on viewpoint are based on the author's philosophies.

Practical implications

This paper provides a better understanding of the principles surrounding leadership and fashions a framework for discussing responsible leadership from a crisis management standpoint. The viewpoint provides an optimistic difference in managing a crisis.

Social implications

The paper provides a better understanding of responsible leadership as an integrated approach to governance, ethics and social responsibility. The paper provides a basis to assess the intersection of the literature on leadership and crisis management.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the literature on responsible leadership within the context of crisis management.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Article

Raheel Yasin

Employee turnover, building a positive corporate image and ethical lapses in the corporate world demand business leaders to perform their jobs with a higher sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee turnover, building a positive corporate image and ethical lapses in the corporate world demand business leaders to perform their jobs with a higher sense of responsibility. This study aims to investigate the mediating effect of ethical climate and corporate image by using the corporate social responsibility theory and social identity theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 280 employees from the banking sector of Pakistan was collected through a questionnaire-based survey by using the convenience sampling technique. The structural equation modeling technique using Smart partial least square was used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

The findings of the study affirmed a significant positive correlation between responsible leadership and ethical climate and ethical climate is significantly positively correlated with corporate image. Meanwhile, the corporate image is negatively correlated with employees’ turnover intention. Results further corroborate ethical climate mediating effect between responsible leadership and corporate image and corporate image likewise mediates between ethical climate and employee turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study enriches the present literature on the subject of responsible leadership, ethical climate, corporate image and turnover intention from the employee’s point of view. Elucidating from previous studies, most of the investigations about the corporate image was conducted from the customers’ perspective and there has been a scarcity of studies focusing on employees’ perspective.

Practical implications

This study guides a value proposition that is concerned with the turnover of employees for human resource professionals from the banking industry. It explores a new dimension of the debate on employee turnover intention.

Originality/value

This study marks the first step toward corporate image as an organizational behavior construct by demonstrating that corporate image impact turnover intention. This study tests a model that demonstrates the role of ethical climate and corporate image in the linkage between responsible leadership and employees’ turnover intention.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part

Günter K. Stahl, Christof Miska, Sheila M. Puffer and Daniel J. McCarthy

Highly publicized scandals and increased stakeholder activism for sustainable development have resulted in calls for more responsible global leadership. At the same time…

Abstract

Highly publicized scandals and increased stakeholder activism for sustainable development have resulted in calls for more responsible global leadership. At the same time, emerging economies characterized by weak institutions, political instability, and a shaky rule of law have gained in importance for global business. Under the lens of responsible global leadership, we highlight the challenges that global leaders face in addressing the needs of diverse, cross-boundary stakeholders, with a particular focus on Western multinational enterprises (MNEs) doing business in emerging markets. We identify three prototypical approaches that MNEs and their leaders take in responding to calls for responsible global leadership, focusing on the tensions and possible trade-offs between globally integrated and locally adapted approaches. We discuss the implications in view of managerial decision making and behavior and offer recommendations for how organizations may promote responsible global leadership.

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Article

Raheel Yasin, Sarah Obsequio Namoco, Junaimah Jauhar, Noor Fareen Abdul Rahim and Najam Ul Zia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which ethical climate mediates between responsible leadership and employee turnover intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which ethical climate mediates between responsible leadership and employee turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the deductive logic approach to develop hypotheses and analytical framework. Data were collected through convenience sampling technique from branch-level employees of the Bank of Punjab Pakistan working in Lahore, Gujranwala and Gujrat Region. Data were analyzed to test the hypotheses via descriptive analysis and structural equation modeling using SPSS and Smart PLS.

Findings

Results confirmed a significant positive association between responsible leadership and ethical climate and a negative association between ethical climate and employee turnover intention. Furthermore, results also confirmed the mediating role of ethical climate between responsible leadership and turnover intention.

Practical implications

This study enhances the existing literature regarding responsible leadership, ethical climate and turnover intention. It also helps professionals to review their policies.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in exploring the relationship between responsible leadership and ethical climate. The current study empirically examined the mediating role of an ethical climate between responsible leadership and employee turnover. It contributes also to the literature regarding responsible leadership, ethical climate and turnover intention.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article

Augusto Antunes and Mário Franco

The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the concept of responsible leadership, find some dimensions and understand how staff in organizations make sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss the concept of responsible leadership, find some dimensions and understand how staff in organizations make sense of this style of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple exploratory case studies in six Portuguese organizations were performed. As data-collecting instruments, several interviews and documentary analysis were used.

Findings

The authors found four dimensions associated with responsible leadership in the organizations studied here: aggregate of virtues; stakeholder involvement; model of leader’s roles; and principles and ethical values. These organizations integrate relationships which seek human well-being, institutions of reference considered good examples to work in and where the best of human nature is stressed. In particular, the modus operandi of their responsible leadership implants dynamics which lead to the development of individuals’ strengths, resilience and vitality.

Practical/implications

The emphasis of this leadership style points mainly to the existence of modern leaders with an integrating, holistic view of stakeholders where the focus is on carrying out their various roles where virtuousness and ethical values play a determinant role. Interpersonal relationships, ethical principles regarding the environment, peers and the community were also practices identified as associated with responsible leadership.

Originality/value

The study contributes to advancing theory in the field of leadership and presents a new framework (dimensions) about responsible leadership. The study is also innovative because contributes to more knowledge about organizations that follow a responsible style of leadership, and in so doing form consistent practices that can represent benchmarking for other organizational structures, even taking into account the natural idiosyncrasies inherent in the Portuguese organizational and business sector.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Amlan Haque, Mario Fernando and Peter Caputi

Drawing on social learning theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediational effect of affective commitment on the relationship between responsible leadership

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social learning theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediational effect of affective commitment on the relationship between responsible leadership and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a two-step process of the structural equation modelling technique to test the proposed hypothesised model. A web-based survey was administered to collect data targeting a sample of 200 full-time Australian employees.

Findings

The results suggest that responsible leadership significantly influences employees’ affective commitment and their intention to quit. As predicted, both responsible leadership and affective commitment negatively influenced intention to quit. Notably, the direct influence of responsible leadership on intention to quit was found to be partially mediated by employees’ affective commitment.

Practical implications

This study shows how leaders can expect to reduce employees’ intention to quit by leading responsibly through valuing employees’ affective commitment.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to responsible leadership literature by linking it with social learning theory. Moreover, there are only a handful of studies examining responsible leadership and its influence on employees’ behavioural outcomes. This study extends the limited understanding of responsible leadership and its relationship with affective commitment and intention to quit.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Ursula Schinzel

The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a link between responsible leadership and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Luxembourg and also to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a link between responsible leadership and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Luxembourg and also to determine Luxembourg’s specifics in the field of CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study. In total, 64 semi-structured interviews were conducted from January to August 2017 with four culturally different samples: Luxembourgers with Luxembourgish nationality, foreigners who reside in Luxembourg, cross-borderers and the rest of the world.

Findings

Responses from all four samples were similar on the one hand and quite contradictory on the other. Three groups were formed: euphoric respondents who said it is the authenticity of the leader and his modelling role in lived CSR; moderate respondents; critical respondents who deny any link between responsible leadership and CSR and claim for change and innovation, accusing the high Uncertainty Avoidance Index. In their opinion, there is an urgent need for managers to learn responsible leadership and CSR.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to the discussion on change and innovation in the field of leadership theory with particular emphasis on responsible leadership following Michael Maccoby, on multilingual and multicultural Luxembourg in the middle of Europe following Geert Hofstede and Edgar Schein and on CSR following Thomas Maak and Nicole Pless.

Originality/value

This study is a combination of research on responsible leadership and CSR in Luxembourg in connection with Hofstede’s cultural dimensions: high long-term orientation, high uncertainty avoidance and high collectivism (low individualism).

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Matthew Eriksen and Kevin Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to develop responsible leaders through developing their response-ability within the context of their day-to-day lives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to develop responsible leaders through developing their response-ability within the context of their day-to-day lives that addresses the existing disconnect between the knowledge about responsible leadership and its practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The responsible leadership development methodology begins by helping individuals increase their awareness of their impact on others based on how they are relating and responding to them. This is facilitated through individuals engaging in self-reflexivity and reflection on relationships for which they want to be responsible. Then individuals experiment with and take responsibility for how they are relating and responding within the relationships. Finally, they engage in self-reflexivity and reflection to make sense of the experience to develop practical wisdom and the response-ability that will allow them to become more responsible leaders.

Findings

Students that completed an MBA leadership course that employed the responsible leadership development methodology overwhelmingly reported that their response-ability improved in ways that allowed them to become more responsible for their actions, impact on others, relationships and the reality they co-construct with others, as well as becoming a more responsible person.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on an MBA class of 24 students, only a few of whom currently occupied organizational leadership positions.

Originality/value

The presented leadership development methodology facilitates the development of responsible leaders through developing their ability and commitment to act responsibly within the context of their day-to-day lives.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Zhiyong Han, Qun Wang and Xiang Yan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effect of felt obligation for constructive change on the relationship between responsible leadership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effect of felt obligation for constructive change on the relationship between responsible leadership and organizational citizenship behavior for the environment (OCBE) in a China corporate environment, and this paper also analyze the moderated mediating effect of supervisor-subordinate guanxi on indirect relationship between responsible leadership and OCBE via felt obligation for constructive change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used 380 employee samples to analyze the relationship between responsible leadership and OCBE. Hierarchical regression analyses and structural equation modeling was adopted to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found that the felt obligation for constructive change plays a fully mediating role between responsible leadership and OCBE. The authors also found a positive interaction between responsible leadership and supervisor-subordinate guanxi on felt obligation for constructive change, and then the indirect effect of responsible leadership on OCBE via felt obligation for constructive change was stronger when employees perceived a high-level supervisor-subordinate guanxi.

Research limitations/implications

When responsible leadership stimulates employees to generate a high sense of constructive change, employees are more likely to engage in OCBE. This study provides evidence for cognitive evaluation theory. This study further demonstrated the importance of establishing high-quality supervisor-subordinate guanxi for responsible leaders and subordinates in China.

Practical implications

In the management practice of the organization, the role of responsible leadership should be strengthened in terms of leadership development and, employee training and promotion, and high-quality supervisor-subordinate guanxi help to promote the effectiveness of responsible leadership.

Originality/value

This paper discusses how and when responsible leadership influences OCBE in a China corporate environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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