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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Maureen Brookes, Levent Altinay and Kate Ringham

– The main aim of this paper is to critically review the contribution made by this theme issue to the literature by examining the implementation of responsible business practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to critically review the contribution made by this theme issue to the literature by examining the implementation of responsible business practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theme issue, a critical content analysis of the papers selected for the issue was undertaken.

Findings

The summary paper generally highlights the themes emerging from the papers selected for this issue. These are the socio-economic and cultural barriers to implementation, conditions needed for successful implementation and the role of education in the implementation of responsible business practice.

Research limitations/implications

The hospitality and tourism enterprises considered in this theme issue operate in a range of contexts and offer a range of practice. Other enterprises in other contexts may also provide insights to the implementation of responsible business practice.

Originality/value

The current theme issue explores emerging issues in the implementation of responsible business practice which highlights the need for further research in this area.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Simon Zadek

The purpose of the paper is to explore the theoretical underpinnings and practical implications of responsible competitiveness, where responsible business practices become

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the theoretical underpinnings and practical implications of responsible competitiveness, where responsible business practices become a driver of national and regional competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on extensive international consultations in association with the United Nations, detailed case studies, and econometric analysis of country level competitiveness and corporate responsibility related data.

Findings

The paper concluded that responsible business practices can contribute to national and regional competitiveness, and that without such links corporate responsibility impacts are likely to remain limited.

Research limitations/implications

Further sector and issue‐based and country‐level research is needed exploring the potential and practice of responsible competitiveness.

Practical implications

Proposes that national and regional strategies for enhancing competitiveness and so also social/environmental outcomes can be grounded in responsible competitiveness. Furthermore, offers insights into how global markets can internalise key costs and benefits.

Originality/value

The paper authors the notion of responsible competitiveness, and provides original definitions, methodology and data previously unpublished in any academic journal.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Justyna Berniak-Woźny

The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the role of business schools in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and responsible management education from the business

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the role of business schools in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and responsible management education from the business school students’ perspective, and to develop a framework for effective CSR education that meets the Polish students’ expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter starts with a review of CSR concept evolution and importance, with a strong focus on Poland. Next, the review of the responsible management education state in Europe and Poland is presented. Then, an evaluation of CSR and responsible management education in Polish business schools from the students’ perspective is conducted. The evaluation is based on a survey amongst business students of a non-public Polish business school. The practical dimension of the chapter takes the form of a framework of effective CSR education in Polish business schools, presented at the end.

Findings

To sum up, the demand for CSR competencies and responsible management is on the rise, both amongst students and employers. The existing international initiatives and accreditation standards give a general idea about the shape of responsible management education, but the exact model must be developed on the regional/country level, as it must include various factors such as the economy, history, culture, academia-business relations or even the dominating teaching model.

Originality/value

The chapter provides a conceptual framework for CSR and responsible management education for those business schools operating in the Polish business context.

Details

The Critical State of Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-149-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Izabela Koładkiewicz

The purpose of this paper is to show the approach to the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Poland. It also intends to characterize the process of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show the approach to the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Poland. It also intends to characterize the process of the implementation of its assumptions subject to Polish economic conditions. At the same time, it aims to pay special attention to the role of small and medium‐sized enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to the concept of CSR in Poland is outlined on the basis of the result of studies conducted over the years 2002‐2007 as published in the Responsible Business in Poland reports by the Responsible Business Forum.

Findings

In spite of the fact that this paper only shows a single segment of a greater whole, the picture of CSR in Poland that emerges from the reports, demonstrates continuous growth in awareness of this subject matter. In the case of companies, worth stressing is the fact that the balance is slowly shifting from expressing mere interest and declarations of undertaking actions in the future to real implementation of ventures and programs tied with responsible business. However, domestic companies are still plagued by a lack of knowledge and familiarity with instruments facilitating the effective implementation of the standards and principles of responsible business.

Research limitations/implications

A significant limitation of the picture of CSR in Poland, as presented in this paper, is the scope and character of sources used. They are restricted to six Responsible Business in Poland reports.

Practical implications

In spite of the fragmentary character of this analysis, its results demonstrate a need to undertake research into current implementations of the concept of responsible business in the small and medium‐sized enterprise sectors. In practice, this sphere remains untouched under Polish conditions.

Originality/value

The paper presents interesting information on the approach to CSR in Poland.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Markku Wilenius and Nando Malmelin

The purpose of this article is to offer insight into the future of responsible business in the media industry. The focus of analysis is on the views and opinions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to offer insight into the future of responsible business in the media industry. The focus of analysis is on the views and opinions of leading CEOs in media companies in Finland about responsible business and the social and organizational challenges faced by the media industry.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the views of top management, extensive interviews in the form of focused theme interviews were performed.

Findings

Companies in the media sector are well aware of the industry's responsibility for its operating environment, but they have not yet adopted the principles of responsible business as an integral part of their day‐to‐day operation and strategic decision making. Directors of media corporations believe that responsibility for staff members and job stability is a particularly important part of the media company's social responsibility. They also believe that modern media companies continue to have important social functions. However, as the competition in the media market continues to toughen, it becomes increasingly important for media companies to show a strong financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The research is able to give a comprehensive picture of foresight thinking within Finnish top media organizations. However, very little can be said about foresight activities of media organizations in other countries. It is proposed that further research covering other interesting countries should be carried out.

Practical implications

Research gives tools to understand the behaviour of media companies in the tightening operating environment. Research implies that media companies should lay more stress on understanding the changing operational environment.

Originality/value

The paper gives a unique picture of the future challenges of media companies.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Case study
Publication date: 12 December 2018

Stephanie Giamporcaro and David Leslie

To understand the motivations for adopting RI practices for institutional investors and asset managers; to understand the different RI strategies available to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

To understand the motivations for adopting RI practices for institutional investors and asset managers; to understand the different RI strategies available to institutional investors; to understand the impediments to adoption of RI at an organisational level; to debate how financial institutions can drive the growth and adoption of RI among the investment community; and to illustrate the complexities of organisational change and the strategies that institutional entrepreneurs can use to overcome resistance to change from key stakeholders.

Case overview/synopsis:

The case is set in October 2017 against the backdrop of the pending unbundling of Old Mutual plc into four new independent businesses, and the subsequent relisting of Old Mutual Ltd on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange in South Africa. The head of responsible investment at Old Mutual Investment Group and the main protagonist of the case, Jon Duncan, is considering what the subsequent relisting will mean for the responsible investing programmes that he has set up over the past six years. The case goes on to describe how responsible investment principles were supported through the implementation of ESG integration and active ownership strategies. It also examines recent developments in ESG product innovations and demonstrates another technique available to responsible investment practitioners in the form of best-in-class ESG screening. The case ends with Duncan contemplating the strategic priorities of the RI team moving forward, and how the managed separation might impact on the RI agenda. It provides prompts for students to discuss and formulate a strategy for advancing the aims of responsible investing.

Complexity academic level

The case is aimed at postgraduate-level students enrolled in a management-related degree programme such as an MBA, and covers both sustainable and responsible finance and institutional entrepreneurship theory.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Mohamed Mousa, Hala A. Abdelgaffar and Rami M. Ayoubi

Out of 24 public business schools in Egypt, the purpose of this paper is to focus on three in order to investigate how responsible management education is perceived and…

Abstract

Purpose

Out of 24 public business schools in Egypt, the purpose of this paper is to focus on three in order to investigate how responsible management education is perceived and exercised by academics there.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 168 academics were contacted and interviewed in 42 focus groups. The length of each focus group was about 45 min, and all of them were conducted in Arabic because the majority of respondents are not fluent in English. The authors used thematic analysis to determine the main ideas in the transcripts.

Findings

Based on data analysis of the perceptions of academics concerning business education, research and management process at the target business schools, the authors of this paper found that responsible management education is not considered a priority in the work agendas of the Egyptian public business schools. Furthermore, the authors believe that besides issues with the general acceptance of the need for responsible management education, there are functional, procedural and edu-academic barriers that these schools need to overcome first before proceeding with implementation and expecting positive outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This research maybe subject to criticism because the authors address only the perspectives of academics in the chosen business schools while neglecting other academic partners, particularly those in managerial positions, such as rectors and heads of departments. Future researchers may use the same research questions to investigate a managerial level perspective to depict a more holistic picture of the situation. Moreover, including Egyptian private business schools may also enrich the findings. In fact, the authors suggest that scholars from different academic disciplines such as sustainability management, business ethics, higher education, sustainability and cultural diversity work together to produce more interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary research on the global responsibility themes business schools have to manage.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in sustainability, HR management, business ethics and higher education literature in which empirical studies on responsible management education and the responsible practices of academics have been limited so far.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2010

Carlos A. Rabasso and Javier Rabasso

The purpose of this paper is to tackle some of the concepts and ideas that the intellectual and business community can learn from Chomsky's thinking in relation with a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to tackle some of the concepts and ideas that the intellectual and business community can learn from Chomsky's thinking in relation with a new global responsible management education environment. The first part of the work will present some of the key elements about Chomsky and education that the authors would like to emphasize. These are relating management education, critical thinking, and systems theory in the twenty‐first century business milieu.

Design/methodology/approach

An insight on post‐colonial theory and education will, afterwards, incorporate the hermeneutical tradition into the mainframe of critical thinking theory. The paper incorporates a decentred approach to education questioning presuppositions and moral values from “fundamentalist market theory.” Cultural studies and non‐western thinkers in this field are another important contribution to back up Chomsky's ideas on business and education.

Findings

When the paper relates social and economic performance concepts to critical thinking business education some questions arise about how to improve the responsible perception and understanding of the global environments and how the authors have to rethink education in a competitive profit‐oriented business community. The ideas of Chomsky can help them to deal with these issues departing from his political vision and his thinking on university education.

Research limitations/implications

Critical management has been questioning in the last years different management models to put forward a responsible paradigm for business organizations and educational institutions. Post‐colonial theory has been another important intellectual ground for critical thinking in the business educational environment, opening up the debate about how to reconcile performance and responsible practices.

Practical implications

Chomsky's committed political views open up the way for many educational institutions and business organizations to become responsible in a technological business environment severely damaged by greed and personal interest. Management schools will have learned from his contributions and the actions of many international organizations engaged in changing for the better attitudes and material values in favour of management for globally responsible practices and the construction of new learning objectives.

Originality/value

In business studies, comparative, critical, cross‐cultural, and diversity management many scholars have been dealing with some of the subjects of serious concern by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology leftist professor presented in this study. The paper has to take into consideration a transversal approach of business education in relation to the concept of cross‐cultural performance, already developed in the work on cross‐cultural and diversity management.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Mark Anthony Camilleri

Firms are increasingly resorting to responsible supply chain management as they align their economic success with socially responsible initiatives in their value chain…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms are increasingly resorting to responsible supply chain management as they align their economic success with socially responsible initiatives in their value chain. This contribution aims to suggest that there are opportunities for global corporations who are keen on integrating responsible practices into their business operations. It is in their interest to report about their responsible supply chain management, social performance and sustainable innovations to their stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identifies future research avenues in the promising areas of responsible procurement and global supply chain management.

Findings

The corporations’ differentiated strategies as well as their proactive engagement in responsible supply chain management can lead them to achieve a competitive advantage in the long term. The low-cost producers may be neglecting the marketplace stakeholders, including suppliers, distributors among others. Moreover, the smaller businesses’ could not be in a position to follow responsible procurement practices, as they may lack the scarce resources to do so.

Originality/value

This paper raises awareness about the integration of socially responsible behaviours and sustainable practices in business operations. It contends that a responsible supply chain management necessitates an improved relationship with suppliers and distributors in the value chain. This stakeholder engagement with ultimately create value to the businesses themselves.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Stefan Hoejmose, Stephen Brammer and Andrew Millington

This paper aims to explore the effect of business strategy on socially responsible supply chain management (SR‐SCM).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effect of business strategy on socially responsible supply chain management (SR‐SCM).

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on data from 178 UK‐based companies, and 340 buyer‐supplier relationships. A novel data collection approach is used, which minimizes social desirability and common methods bias, to capture socially responsible supply chain management. The data are analysed through a set of OLS regressions.

Findings

Business strategies significantly influence socially responsible supply chain management. Low‐cost producers largely neglect their social responsibilities in the supply chain. In contrast, firms pursuing differentiation strategies are considerably more engaged with these issues, partly because they have better supply chain processes.

Practical implications

Practitioners should carefully consider the fit between strategic position and level of engagement with SR‐SCM, since our results emphasise the relationship between SR‐SCM and business strategy. Proactive engagement with SR‐SCM, however, also implies sound supply chain processes, which must also be aligned with business strategy. Policy‐makers should consider the low engagement with SR‐SCM of low‐cost producers and the implications for SR‐SCM in cost sensitive and competitive global markets.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic cross‐sectional study of the relationship between business strategy and socially responsible supply chain management (SR‐SCM). These results suggest that there is a clear relationship between the strategic position of the firm and their SR‐SCM practices. These results contribute to the on‐going debate on relationships between strategy and supply chain management, and the emerging debate on the relationships between strategy and SR‐SCM.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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