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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Robert Fox

Integration of library services via automated means does not require that the patron make abrupt shifts between interfaces or tools in order to take advantage of the vast…

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261

Abstract

Purpose

Integration of library services via automated means does not require that the patron make abrupt shifts between interfaces or tools in order to take advantage of the vast array of resources a modern academic library provides. This can be accomplished in a seamless manner. This column aims to explore ways in which libraries can leverage the data sources of their parent institution to provide robust resources in the environments where their constituents typically perform their day to day work.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was done, but the column primarily relies on the experience of the author.

Findings

This column just scratches the surface for how libraries can better “fit in” with their parent institutions by leveraging already existing data sources. While this requires a high degree of cooperation with institutional partners, the return on that investment is very valuable.

Originality/value

Integration services are a key area in the provisioning of library services and content. Institutional data sources provide a rich source of information for catering library resources and content to individual students and faculty.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Yonghong Jin, Meng Xu, Wei Wang and Yuqin Xi

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how venture capital institutions can use their syndicated investment network to help listed companies to achieve better performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how venture capital institutions can use their syndicated investment network to help listed companies to achieve better performance in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds a fixed effect unbalanced panel regression model to study the impact of venture capital network on the M&A performance of listed companies.

Findings

Evidence indicated that the stronger the information resource acquisition ability of venture capital institutions in the network, the better the listed company's M&A performance supported; the stronger the information resource control ability of venture capital institutions in the network, the better the listed company's M&A performance supported; the higher the participation of venture capital institutions, the more significant the positive impact of information resource acquisition and information resource control abilities on M&A performance in the network.

Research limitations/implications

The data in this paper are from China's Growth Enterprise Market (GEM), other markets may be considered in the future research studies.

Practical implications

The research conclusions of this paper affirm the positive role played by venture capital institutions through syndicated investment in eliminating information asymmetry in M&A of invested companies. The information resource acquisition and control abilities and participation degree of the venture capital network have positively promoted the M&A performance of the invested enterprises.

Originality/value

The conclusions of this paper not only provide useful supplements to existing research literature on venture capital network functions and corporate M&A but also have certain guiding value for venture capital institutions and start-ups to better use venture capital practices to improve their capabilities and performance.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2004

Kiyohiko Ito and Elizabeth L. Rose

As companies grow and increase the number of products they have on offer, they generally change and adapt their organizational structures, in order to arrange their…

Abstract

As companies grow and increase the number of products they have on offer, they generally change and adapt their organizational structures, in order to arrange their resources and product mix in ways that will create value. We analyze various corporate structures that have been adopted by U.S., European, and Japanese companies, in the context of the resource‐based view of the firm. These corporate structures include functional, divisional, conglomerate diversification, core competence‐based diversification, and keiretsu. We also identify an emerging structure. This recent development is a network of alliances, aimed at pursuing economies of scale, scope, and speed.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Kevin Curran and Sheila McKinney

Seeks to demonstrate how, with regard to viewing video on the internet, the delay experienced, whilst the stream is being buffered, can be virtually eradicated.

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to demonstrate how, with regard to viewing video on the internet, the delay experienced, whilst the stream is being buffered, can be virtually eradicated.

Design/methodology/approach

Documents a scheduled rich site summary (RSS) multimedia prototype which utilizes idle computer time (at night) to subscribe to media RSS channels in order to download audio and video content.

Findings

Finds that, a part from involving zero display, the quality of the operation is controlled only by the size of the hard disk not by the capacity of the connection.

Originality/value

The system documented here will serve users at either end of the RSS feed chain.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Anne Petry‐Eberle and Monika Bieg

The purpose of this paper is to present the systematic redevelopment of a Corporate Information Center's strategy, with particular focus on the aspect of outsourcing…

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2298

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the systematic redevelopment of a Corporate Information Center's strategy, with particular focus on the aspect of outsourcing services. This aspect is emphasised, because it is the only way to realise a new business model without an increase in resources.

Design/methodology/approach

There is a description of which services have been outsourced, while it is also made clear which activities related to the creation of processes and their supervision have remained in the company's internal Information Center, and how they are changing as time goes on. The licensing of information sources from external aggregators is viewed in the context of outsourcing, as is the latest development in Vendor Portfolio Management.

Findings

After the transformation of the classic spectrum of library services into the strategically created portfolio of an Online Information Center, the core tasks at the forefront are those which anchor the Information Center in the corporation of which it is a part, and which perfectly combine the interests of the corporation with the use of information industry competencies through cooperation and partnership with service providers.

Originality/value

The case study demonstrates how, and for what purpose, information industry competencies can be used in an Online Information Center. Even with limited resources, the skilful use of outsourcing solutions makes possible the redevelopment of strategy and therefore change.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Janine Schmidt

As the younger generation of born digital library users and even well‐established scholars rely increasingly on Google, or its new products Google Scholar and Google Book…

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5256

Abstract

Purpose

As the younger generation of born digital library users and even well‐established scholars rely increasingly on Google, or its new products Google Scholar and Google Book, for information resource discovery and access, libraries are finding it increasingly difficult to ensure that their own well structured web sites and information services are being utilized appropriately. This paper aims to highlight some of the changes occurring in the information environment and suggests ways of marketing library services effectively to today's users.

Design/methodology/aproach

Marketing concepts are explored in the paper, focusing on a clear understanding of users, the library's products, the appropriate place for service delivery, an appropriate pricing strategy – and effective promotional strategies. Promotional strategies which are being used effectively by some commercial organizations, as well as approaches being developed by some libraries, are highlighted. Practical hints are provided so that libraries can ensure that their missions of ensuring that every book has its reader can be accomplished in a new age of access to information in real books and journals and virtual books and journals and other information resources.

Findings

The paper finds that libraries no longer operate in a “come and get it” environment and new ways of outreach are described which ensure that librarians are out amongst their communities, creating an awareness of the services available and ensuring effective use of resources through a variety of approaches used in university libraries in Australia and at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information on the changes occurring in the information environment and ways of marketing library services effectively to today's users.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Julia Gelfand

The purpose of this paper is to highlight sessions and themes of the annual Society of Scholarly Publishing conference.

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570

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight sessions and themes of the annual Society of Scholarly Publishing conference.

Design/methodology/approach

Conference report Building on Technology 2.0 and Library 2.0, this theme was on Scholarly Communication 2.0 and even though there was some obvious overlap well known by librarians, there was plenty of creative and new ideas that were shared.

Findings

The role of the reader and library user are of more importance than in the past and new products and services now cater to that increasingly emphasized role.

Originality value

Change in readership, product development, marketing, branding, and nearly everything in the scholarly publishing marketplace has determined that new partnerships and interests are evolving.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Brian Metcalfe

Until the Campbell Report in 1981 the Australian government had a stated policy of not permitting foreign banks authority to carry out banking business in Australia or to…

Abstract

Until the Campbell Report in 1981 the Australian government had a stated policy of not permitting foreign banks authority to carry out banking business in Australia or to acquire interests in Australian banks. Following the report Australia now represents one of the most deregulated financial environments. In February 1985, 16 foreign banks were invited to establish full service banking operations. Considerable potential exists for these entrants but the banks will need to identify their competitive advantages quickly in relation to both indigenous and other foreign banks. All banks will try to expand market share by capitalising on their strengths and servicing recognisable market niches.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Shinhyung Kang

Prior literature indicates that syndication enhances the likelihood of ventures’ successful exits; however, it has neglected the differences among venture capital (VC…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior literature indicates that syndication enhances the likelihood of ventures’ successful exits; however, it has neglected the differences among venture capital (VC) investor types. In fact, there are various types of VC investors with distinctive objectives. Therefore, by focusing on ventures backed by corporate venture capital (CVC) and independent venture capital (IVC) investors, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the relative influence among a heterogeneous group of VC investors in a syndicate affects the likelihood of the venture’s successful exit.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 1,121 US ventures that received funding from both CVC and IVC investors during 2001 and 2013 are collected. Then, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied to analyze the likelihood of a successful exit (i.e. initial public offering or acquisition).

Findings

The relative reputation of CVC investors vis-à-vis their IVC co-investors in a syndicate is negatively associated with the likelihood of the venture’s successful exit. This negative relationship is exacerbated when CVC investors are geographically close to the focal venture, and it is weakened when CVC investors syndicate with IVC investors that they have collaborated in the past.

Originality/value

First, this paper advances VC syndication literature by demonstrating that syndication does not positively affect the likelihood of a venture’s successful exit unless key syndicate members seek to pursue going public or acquisition strategy. Second, this paper also reveals when CVC is beneficial from the ventures’ perspective. CVC participation facilitates ventures’ successful exits as long as reputable IVC investors are present in the syndicate. Third, this study contributes to the multiple agency perspective by showing that formal governance mechanisms affect ventures’ conduct and performance as well as informal sources of power.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Amir Pezeshkan, Adam Smith, Stav Fainshmidt and Jing Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to advance a holistic model of venture capital (VC) firms’ syndication decisions in an emerging economy. When considering syndication with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance a holistic model of venture capital (VC) firms’ syndication decisions in an emerging economy. When considering syndication with local partners, VC firms consider multiple sources of risk related to firm-specific characteristics (life-cycle, operational and political). In conjunction with these risk factors, they also consider their own capabilities, namely, their knowledge breadth and knowledge depth. Knowledge breadth stems from a VC firm’s network position and knowledge depth is a result of its prior industry expertise. Together, these capabilities have competing impacts on VC firms’ desire to syndicate. From one perspective, VC firm capabilities may help deal with risk such that syndication may not be perceived as necessary. Alternatively, VC firm capabilities may signal attractiveness to a local partner and allow the VC firm to syndicate more easily.

Design/methodology/approach

Fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis is conducted on a sample of 111 US VC firms investing in China between 1993 and 2010.

Findings

Lower VC firm capabilities are associated with a tendency not to syndicate with a local partner when venture risk factors are low. This pattern may arise because of such VC firms’ relative lack of experience with partnership management or weaker appeal to local partners.

Originality/value

This study is one of the earliest attempts to develop a neo-configurational perspective within the VC literature and thus contributes to a more nuanced understanding of international VC firms’ strategic behaviour in emerging economies by examining multiple risks and capabilities simultaneously and in conjunction.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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