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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2006

Javier Gimeno, Ming-Jer Chen and Jonghoon Bae

We investigate the dynamics of competitive repositioning of firms in the deregulated U.S. airline industry (1979–1995) in terms of a firm's target market, strategic…

Abstract

We investigate the dynamics of competitive repositioning of firms in the deregulated U.S. airline industry (1979–1995) in terms of a firm's target market, strategic posture, and resource endowment relative to other firms in the industry. We suggest that, despite strong inertia in competitive positions, the direction of repositioning responds to external and internal alignment considerations. For external alignment, we examined how firms changed their competitive positioning to mimic the positions of similar, successful firms, and to differentiate themselves when experiencing intense rivalry. For internal alignment, we examined how firms changed their position in each dimension to align with the other dimensions of positioning. This internal alignment led to convergent positioning moves for firms with similar resource endowments and strategic postures, and divergent moves for firms with similar target markets and strategic postures. The evidence suggests that repositioning moves in terms of target markets and resource endowments are more sensitive to external and internal alignment considerations, but that changes in strategic posture are subject to very high inertia and do not appear to respond well to alignment considerations.

Details

Ecology and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-435-5

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Fei Li, Yan Chen and Yipeng Liu

This paper aims to examine how integration modes impact the acquirer knowledge diffusion capacity of overseas mergers and acquisitions (M&As) effected by emerging market…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how integration modes impact the acquirer knowledge diffusion capacity of overseas mergers and acquisitions (M&As) effected by emerging market firms and the role played by the global innovation network position of the acquiring firms in affecting this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the use of structural equation modelling and bootstrap testing, the hypotheses are tested by drawing upon a sample of 102 overseas M&As effected by listed Chinese manufacturing companies.

Findings

The results show that acquirers from emerging countries are unable to increase the knowledge diffusion capacity unless they choose the right post-merger integration mode. This paper also finds that the relationship between integration mode and knowledge diffusion is channelled through the centrality and structural holes of acquirers in the global innovation networks. When considering the combinations of different resource similarities and complementarities of the acquired firms, differences emerge in the integration model and network embedded path of acquirers in emerging countries.

Practical implications

Emerging market multinational enterprises should consider post-merger integration as a crucial facilitator to the crafting of global innovation network positions that promote knowledge diffusion. The choices of integration mode and brand management autonomy should be matched with the resource similarities and complementarities that exist between the acquirer and target firms.

Originality/value

Based on the resource orchestration theory and by focussing on network centrality and structural hole as the crucial links, this study provides a nuanced understanding of the relationship between post-merger integration and knowledge diffusion and sheds light on latecomer firms from emerging countries.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2009

Ángeles Montoro‐Sanchez and Marta Ortiz‐de‐Urbina‐Criado

The aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of intangible assets and similarity of resources on the choice between acquisitions and joint ventures and whether it is…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyze the influence of intangible assets and similarity of resources on the choice between acquisitions and joint ventures and whether it is different in domestic and European operations. In order to test these relations, a sample of domestic and European growth deals was selected (563 deals, of which 449 are acquisitions and 114 are joint ventures). Results demonstrate that it is more probable that firms will choose acquisitions if there is a close similarity between the resources of the firms. Also, if the operation is domestic, companies with higher proportions of intangible resources prefer acquisitions.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Hsin-Chang Yang, Chung-Hong Lee and Wen-Sheng Liao

Measuring the similarity between two resources is considered difficult due to a lack of reliable information and a wide variety of available information regarding the…

Abstract

Purpose

Measuring the similarity between two resources is considered difficult due to a lack of reliable information and a wide variety of available information regarding the resources. Many approaches have been devised to tackle such difficulty. Although content-based approaches, which adopted resource-related data in comparing resources, played a major role in similarity measurement methodology, the lack of semantic insight on the data may leave these approaches imperfect. The purpose of this paper is to incorporate data semantics into the measuring process.

Design/methodology/approach

The emerged linked open data (LOD) provide a practical solution to tackle such difficulty. Common methodologies consuming LOD mainly focused on using link attributes that provide some sort of semantic relations between data. In this work, methods for measuring semantic distances between resources using information gathered from LOD were proposed. Such distances were then applied to music recommendation, focusing on the effect of various weight and level settings.

Findings

This work conducted experiments using the MusicBrainz dataset and evaluated the proposed schemes for the plausibility of LOD on music recommendation. The experimental result shows that the proposed methods electively improved classic approaches for both linked data semantic distance (LDSD) and PathSim methods by 47 and 9.7%, respectively.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this work is to develop novel schemes for incorporating knowledge from LOD. Two types of knowledge, namely attribute and path, were derived and incorporated into similarity measurements. Such knowledge may reflect the relationships between resources in a semantic manner since the links in LOD carry much semantic information regarding connecting resources.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Feiqiong Chen, Jieru Zhu and Wenjing Wang

The purpose of the paper is to examine the coevolutionary dynamics between multistage overseas mergers and acquisitions (M&A) integration and knowledge network…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the coevolutionary dynamics between multistage overseas mergers and acquisitions (M&A) integration and knowledge network reconfiguration and the impact of this coevolution on industrial technology innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds a coevolution analysis framework in stages and constructs structural equation models for empirical tests using the Chinese technology-sourcing overseas M&A events that occurred from 2001 to 2012.

Findings

Overseas M&A integration and knowledge network reconfiguration are in a coevolutionary relationship, driving industrial technology innovation. The acquirer adopts initial integration degree that matches the resource relatedness between the acquiring and acquired parties, promoting initial industrial technology innovation through initial knowledge network reconfiguration. Initial knowledge network reconfiguration will feed back to the M&A integration decision in the mid-to-late stage through increasing knowledge similarity and narrowing network position difference. The higher the improvement of mid-to-late integration degree, the more it can drive mid-to-late industrial technology innovation through mid-to-late knowledge network reconfiguration.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can accurately classify overseas M&A integration stages through case tracking and explore other network attributes.

Practical implications

Practical guidelines are provided for managers on how to implement a multistage overseas M&A integration strategy, optimize knowledge network reconfiguration and promote industrial technology innovation. Significant practical implications are presented, especially in academia, society and quality of life.

Originality/value

Different from the previous research considering M&A integration as a single-stage decision, this paper emphasizes the dynamics of the M&A integration process and explores the coevolution mechanism of multistage overseas M&A integration and knowledge network reconfiguration.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 5 July 2016

Martin Weiss

The linkage between diversification and performance has puzzled scholars for decades. A vast amount of empirical studies, together with the help of meta-analyses…

Abstract

The linkage between diversification and performance has puzzled scholars for decades. A vast amount of empirical studies, together with the help of meta-analyses condensing diverse results, established a widely shared understanding that related diversification leads to superior firm performance. The main rationale for this finding is that relatedness within a company’s portfolio of businesses allows the company to achieve synergies by sharing or transferring resources. Although the predominant importance of related diversification seems generally accepted, scholars raise severe concerns about our ability to precisely define and measure relatedness. In most studies, traditional measures of diversification such as the Berry index are used, which assess relatedness from a product/market perspective. However, these measures face strong criticisms for their low degree of content validity. So if we doubt our understanding of relatedness, how can we agree on the performance effect of related diversification? To reassure our understanding of the diversification-performance linkage, this study critically reflects upon the underlying phenomenon of relatedness. By compiling and evaluating the different perspectives of relatedness with their heterogeneous conceptualizations and measures, this study supports the view that the multi-facetted nature of relatedness can only be captured inadequately so far. Moreover, most prior work mainly focuses on synergy potential rather than on the realization of synergies, thereby neglecting a mechanism that may have an important bearing on the performance effects of diversification.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Stefan Dietze, Salvador Sanchez‐Alonso, Hannes Ebner, Hong Qing Yu, Daniela Giordano, Ivana Marenzi and Bernardo Pereira Nunes

Research in the area of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) throughout the last decade has largely focused on sharing and reusing educational resources and data. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Research in the area of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) throughout the last decade has largely focused on sharing and reusing educational resources and data. This effort has led to a fragmented landscape of competing metadata schemas, or interface mechanisms. More recently, semantic technologies were taken into account to improve interoperability. The linked data approach has emerged as the de facto standard for sharing data on the web. To this end, it is obvious that the application of linked data principles offers a large potential to solve interoperability issues in the field of TEL. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, approaches are surveyed that are aimed towards a vision of linked education, i.e. education which exploits educational web data. It particularly considers the exploitation of the wealth of already existing TEL data on the web by allowing its exposure as linked data and by taking into account automated enrichment and interlinking techniques to provide rich and well‐interlinked data for the educational domain.

Findings

So far web‐scale integration of educational resources is not facilitated, mainly due to the lack of take‐up of shared principles, datasets and schemas. However, linked data principles increasingly are recognized by the TEL community. The paper provides a structured assessment and classification of existing challenges and approaches, serving as potential guideline for researchers and practitioners in the field.

Originality/value

Being one of the first comprehensive surveys on the topic of linked data for education, the paper has the potential to become a widely recognized reference publication in the area.

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

T.J. Hannigan, Robert D. Hamilton III and Ram Mudambi

– This study aims to employ a resource-based lens to explore the competitive implications of firm strategies under conditions of market commonality and shared resource pools.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to employ a resource-based lens to explore the competitive implications of firm strategies under conditions of market commonality and shared resource pools.

Design/methodology/approach

The firms’ core capabilities in these environments may focus on operational efficiency, as firms seek to compete under significant resource heterogeneity constraints.

Findings

Using data from the USA airline industry from 1996-2011, we find that price has a positive relationship with firm performance, whereas quality has a negative relationship. Operational efficiency is a driver of both strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses US data. Extending the findings to the global setting may require recognizing other competitive dimensions.

Originality/value

Firms that focus on non-core activities perform less well. The results offer insights into an industry that has interested strategy researchers for many years and may suggest an application to other industries with similar characteristics.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Richard Reed and Susan F. Storrud‐Barnes

The paper's aim is to build a model that predicts the optimum tactics for capitalizing on inventions within the context of competitive interaction among large firms. For…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to build a model that predicts the optimum tactics for capitalizing on inventions within the context of competitive interaction among large firms. For patenting, the paper seeks to show how invention value and firm rivalry drive the tactics of competing, deterring competitors, retreating from markets, and cooperating. It also aims to explore the effects of the contingencies of patent bulking, technology complexity, spheres of influence, resource similarity, and complementary‐resource tacitness.

Design/methodology/approach

The work is conceptual.

Findings

The base model shows that patenting can be used to protect markets where there is high invention‐value and high rivalry. When both invention‐value and rivalry are low, the best tactic is to cooperate. When value is high and rivalry low, patenting can be used as a signaling and deterring mechanism, but when value is low and rivalry is high the best option is to let patents lapse and retreat from markets. The moderating effects of patent bulking, technology complexity, spheres of influence, resource similarity, and complementary‐resource tacitness affect rivalry and the amount of patenting that will be done.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides propositions for empirical testing that are predictive of firm performance, rivalry, and patent bulking. Despite the authors' attention to key contingencies, it is impossible to be completely comprehensive in addressing all contingencies.

Practical implications

The framework provides tactics for competing and, consequently, maximizing income and minimizing costs.

Originality/value

The work synthesizes extant thinking on patents and multipoint competition. While the base model should be valuable for managers, the overall work should be valuable for academics.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Elrasheid Elkhidir, Sandeeka Mannakkara and Suzanne Wilkinson

The purpose of this paper is to establish the factors affecting the selection of a suitable partner city for resilience building at the national level.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the factors affecting the selection of a suitable partner city for resilience building at the national level.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory sequential research was adopted using New Zealand as a case study. Data were collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews and subsequently validated through an online survey.

Findings

The study confirmed that the criteria for selecting partner cities for collaboration and knowledge sharing on resilience were similarity of hazards, geographic proximity, city resources and priorities, resilience performance, city size and demographics, previous relationship, willingness to collaborate and similar industries.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will help guide cities that are interested in developing national-level resilience partnerships through the process of selecting the most suitable partner cities.

Originality/value

Despite the existence of international intercity resilience networks, there is a lack of information on the criteria affecting the selection of suitable resilience partner cities at the national level. This paper addresses this gap and offers informed decision-making criteria for cities to consider.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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