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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Usha Lenka and Binita Tiwari

The purpose of this paper is to review the extant literature on resonant leadership and develop a conceptual framework about the role played by resonant leaders of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the extant literature on resonant leadership and develop a conceptual framework about the role played by resonant leaders of crisis-ridden firms in developing employees for achieving triple “P” bottom line.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of literature was conducted from 1994 to 2015 with key words leadership, resonant leadership, and triple “P” bottom line. Related research papers were searched from select databases of Elsevier, Emerald, Sage, Springer, Taylor and Francis, Wiley, and other library services of Proquest, Ebsco, and Scopus.

Findings

Resonant leaders motivate their subordinates by being compassionate toward them, showing an overall positive mood, and through guidance for achieving sustainable triple “P” bottom line. India is a secular country that emphasizes on spiritual beliefs as well as on socio-cultural and religious values. Therefore, Indian managers generally adopt these values in their early socialization process by following traditional epics and religious scriptures. They spread positive emotions among their subordinates and raise their level of consciousness by exhibiting altruistic values. Therefore, altruism could be considered as an additional dimension of resonant leadership style of Indian managers for downsized firms. These leaders nurture surviving employees at the time of economic crisis to build a sustainable triple “P” bottom line.

Originality/value

Altruism can be considered as a new dimension of resonant leadership style of Indian managers for downsized firms. These leaders provide a sense of psychological security to their employees by developing a value led organization with meaningful vision and an edge over their competitors.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Annie McKee and Dick Massimilian

The authors contend that the current, intensive emphasis on short‐term results prevalent in much of corporate America unwittingly undercuts the ability of companies to

Abstract

Purpose

The authors contend that the current, intensive emphasis on short‐term results prevalent in much of corporate America unwittingly undercuts the ability of companies to achieve long‐term financial success. Given the “always on” nature of life for senior executives in the Digital Age, leaders find themselves subject to tremendous, ever‐increasing pressures and a perceived and/or real need to work harder and longer. The mental, physical and psychological toll extracted by these pressures over time leads to escalating personal sacrifice and ultimately, if unaddressed to the well‐known phenomenon known as “burnout”. Through recognizing what the authors refer to as the Cycle of Sacrifice and Renewal, executives can renew themselves using Mindfulness, Hope and Compassion. Through renewal, senior leaders can counteract the effects of work‐related pressures, perform at their best over the long‐term, and lead their organizations to sustained long‐term financial success.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors rely on research conducted by co‐author Annie McKee and Richard Boyatzis as outlined extensively in their current book, Resonant Leadership.

Findings

The authors discuss the Cycle of Sacrifice and Renewal as well as Mindfulness, Hope and Compassion, defining each term, and explain the relevance of each to a leader committed to achieving sustained, long‐term performance.

Originality/value

The paper is relevant to current and aspiring leaders and to Human Resource executives interested in working with people to help them perform at their best.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Usha Lenka and Minisha Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework exploring innovation process in research and development units of organizations. Research and development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework exploring innovation process in research and development units of organizations. Research and development (R&D) teams of pharmaceutical firms operating in India were the unit of analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 352 leaders and equal number of team members working in R&D teams. Responses were collected through questionnaire survey method. Questions to measure variables of members’ proactive personality, emotional intelligence, trust, task reflexivity, team creativity and innovation adoption were answered by team leaders. Similarly, questions on variables, resonant leadership style of team leaders, team information sharing process and climate for innovation were answered by team members. Out of 450 distributed questionnaires, 352 completely filled responses were finally obtained, with a response rate of 78 percent. Data were analyzed through structural equation modeling using AMOS 21.0 software package.

Findings

Findings of the study reveal that members’ proactive personality, emotional intelligence and trust enhance members’ learning ability called task reflexivity. This learning is further promulgated with the intervention of team information sharing process and support for innovation. Team creativity enhances innovation implementation in organizations. However, resonant leadership style of team leaders does not support task reflexivity.

Practical implications

Overall, the study highlights that creativity is promulgated when information is disseminated among members in a supportive climate for innovation. Organizations can create and innovate by developing capability of members who are proactive, emotionally intelligent and who trust their colleagues, so that team members can rationally judge organizational priorities, learn from their colleagues, plan and execute novice ideas to serve market needs.

Originality/value

R&D team enhances creativity and innovation in organizations by leveraging their talent and skills. This work is an attempt to develop an innovation process model in Indian pharmaceutical organizations to promulgate creativity and innovation through R&D teams.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2014

Stephanie Beverage, Kathleen DeLong, Irene M. H. Herold and Kenley Neufeld

From the perspective of library leaders, this chapter charts a path to mindful leadership by providing key definitions, theories, and organizational and cultural…

Abstract

From the perspective of library leaders, this chapter charts a path to mindful leadership by providing key definitions, theories, and organizational and cultural applications of mindful leadership. The four authors bring personal experience and knowledge to the topic by outlining practical examples of applying mindfulness in the workplace and in leading the library profession. The chapter considers the College Library Directors’ Mentor Program from the College Libraries Section of the Association of College and Research Libraries as a case study for mindful leadership in this successful leadership development program.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-469-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Carol Wong and Greta Cummings

Authentic leadership is an emerging theoretical model purported to focus on the root component of effective leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the…

Abstract

Purpose

Authentic leadership is an emerging theoretical model purported to focus on the root component of effective leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the relevance of authentic leadership to the advancement of nursing leadership practice and research and address the question of whether this is a new theory for leadership or an old one in new packaging.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the origins and key elements of the model, assesses the theoretical, conceptual and measurement issues associated with authentic leadership and compares it with other leadership theories frequently reported in the nursing literature.

Findings

The emerging authentic leadership theory holds promise for explaining the underlying processes by which authentic leaders and followers influence work outcomes and organizational performance. Construct validity of authentic leadership has preliminary documentation and a few studies have shown positive relationships between authenticity and trust. Furthermore, the clarity of the authenticity construct and comprehensiveness of the overall theoretical framework provide a fruitful base for future research examining the relationship between authentic leadership and the creation of healthier work environments.

Originality/value

A clear focus on the relational aspects of leadership, the foundational moral/ethical component, a potential linkage of positive psychological capital to work engagement and the emphasis on leader and follower development in the authentic leadership framework are closely aligned to current and future nursing leadership practice and research priorities for the creation of sustainable changes in nursing work environments.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Anthony McKeown and Jessica Bates

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study concerning what emotional intelligence (EI) leadership attributes branch managers in the public library service in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study concerning what emotional intelligence (EI) leadership attributes branch managers in the public library service in Northern Ireland (Libraries NI) consider to be most important.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology in the study involved a survey of all branch managers in Libraries NI – an online questionnaire containing quantitative and qualitative questions was sent to 104 branch managers. Goleman's Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI) was used to examine what attributes and skills were considered to be more important.

Findings

The study found that while EI was a new concept to the majority of respondents, they were valuing and demonstrating EI attributes and traits in their work. The top five leadership attributes were: communication; teamwork and collaboration; adaptability; integrity/trustworthiness; and organisational awareness. Likert‐scale questions showed that being able to empathise with staff was considered to be important, and open‐ended questions demonstrated that the branch managers recognised the importance of self‐awareness and that recognising emotions in staff was an important management trait.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides insight into the perceptions and practices of EI leadership within a public library setting and contributes to the research literature on the relevance of EI leadership for library management. It provides valuable comparative data for similar research undertaken elsewhere. Specific recommendations for further research into EI leadership and public libraries are also made.

Practical implications

The paper shows how the findings can be used to improve practice. Three specific frameworks are proposed which can be applied in the workplace: an Emotional Intelligence Leadership Skills Competency Framework for Branch Managers, which lists the personal and social competencies for branch managers in public libraries; suggestions for applying EI to leadership/management and staff development; and suggestions for applying EI to customer relations.

Originality/value

This study analyses for the first time EI leadership in a public library setting in Northern Ireland, and contributes to the emergent literature on EI and library leadership. The EI Leadership Skills Competency Framework for Branch Managers that is developed from this study can be applied, tested and used within and beyond the Northern Ireland public library setting in which it was conceived.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Sara Nolan

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Roberta Sammut and Amanda Scicluna

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perceived transformational leadership practices of charge and staff nurses. Transformational leadership is effective in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the perceived transformational leadership practices of charge and staff nurses. Transformational leadership is effective in promoting change in organisations, with the leader guiding followers towards a common vision.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative, descriptive, comparative survey design was used. All charge nurses (N = 151) and staff nurses (N = 1,950) in six health entities in Malta were included. A mixed mode survey design was used. Data were collected using the Leadership Practices Inventory and analysed using ANOVA and the Kruskal–Wallis test.

Findings

An overall response rate of 15% (n = 315) was achieved. Both staff and charge nurses perceived transformational leadership to be practiced. Charge nurses scored consistently higher than staff nurses. In long-term care environments, charge nurses are more likely to “model the way”, while in acute settings, they were more likely to “enable others to act”.

Research limitations/implications

Transformational leadership appears to be applied by charge nurses in Malta. The response rate achieved was low and may limit the generalisability of the results of the study.

Practical implications

Nurse managers need to adapt their transformational leadership style based on the context in which they work.

Originality/value

Regular feedback from nursing staff should be sought for charge nurses to be aware of the extent to which they are implementing transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Freeda Brook and Martinique Hallerduff

Feminist leadership in libraries is an emerging area of interest. Distinct from traditional leadership or female leadership, it includes such values as critiquing systems…

Abstract

Feminist leadership in libraries is an emerging area of interest. Distinct from traditional leadership or female leadership, it includes such values as critiquing systems of oppression, valuing whole people, empowering individuals, and sharing information. Here we ask, what do feminist academic library leaders do? And can academic libraries operate as sites of resistance to systems of oppression? We surveyed 55 people and conducted 23 semi-structured interviews with library leaders focusing on how they enact feminist values in the workplace. In this chapter, we explore several key themes that emerged through our research: how library leaders specifically advocate for their staff and users, how organizational structures support or resist feminist leadership, and how decision-making functions in their organizations. While there is no single way to be a feminist leader, we discuss the varied ways our participants enact their feminism, from day-to-day words and actions to larger initiatives and programs. As to whether these libraries are functioning as feminist organizations and able to resist or even change dominant oppressive systems of power, the results are unclear. The culture of the parent institutions seems to be a decisive factor in how academic libraries operate, and none of our participants report success at fully breaking away from those norms. Yet our participants also demonstrate how they have sidestepped or even changed official policies to be more inclusive and flexible. In this chapter we present clear examples of feminist values enacted in academic libraries as well as direction for further research.

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