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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Justin L. Otto, Qing H. Meade, Jeffrey L. Stafford and Patricia Wahler

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Library Lights Out, an annual collaboration between the library and Housing & Residential

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Library Lights Out, an annual collaboration between the library and Housing & Residential Life at Eastern Washington University (EWU). This creative outreach program features collaborative educational and recreational activities, is a cost-sharing partnership and serves to further the organizational goals of both the library and Housing & Residential Life.

Design/methodology/approach

The John F. Kennedy Library at EWU was initially approached by Housing & Residential Life with the idea for an overnight event in the library, which became Library Lights Out. Student participants in this event spend the night in the library and participate in a variety of educational, team-building and fun programs, such as a library resources scavenger hunt and “capture the flag” in the library stacks. Library Lights Out has become an annual event funded primarily by Housing & Residential Life, facilitated by the library and driven by students.

Findings

Library Lights Out has been a successful partnership that benefits the library, students and Housing & Residential Life.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited body of literature on academic library outreach to residence halls by highlighting three unique aspects of Library Lights Out. First, it is a cost-sharing partnership which was initiated by Housing & Residential Life and not by the library. Second, it occurs in the library and not in the residence halls, unlike most library outreach to residence halls. Finally, it is an overnight sleepover event with a combination of an educational program and recreational activities and games.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Gregory A. Aarons, Elizabeth A. Miller, Amy E. Green, Jennifer A. Perrott and Richard Bradway

Evidence‐based practices (EBPs) are increasingly being implemented in real‐world settings. While intervention effectiveness is dependent on fidelity, interventions are…

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840

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence‐based practices (EBPs) are increasingly being implemented in real‐world settings. While intervention effectiveness is dependent on fidelity, interventions are often adapted to service settings according to the needs of stakeholders at multiple levels. This study aims to examine the naturalistic implementation of The Incredible Years (IY) parenting programme in a residential substance abuse treatment programme for pregnant and parenting women.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in a residential substance abuse treatment programme serving pregnant and parenting women and their children. Participants included 120 female clients. The primary IY facilitator was a master's level counselling psychologist. In person observations of IY sessions were completed by a trained bachelor's level anthropologist. Ethnographic field notes were collected and then coded in keeping with a priori themes and to identify emergent themes. The Parent Group Leader Checklist was used to evaluate quality and integrity of the IY basic parent programme.

Findings

Quantitative analyses indicate that fidelity varied by type of checklist activity. Specifically, adherence to the IY programme was highest in beginning topic activities, setup, and home activity review, and lowest in role play, vignettes, and wrap‐up activities. Qualitative analyses revealed a number of adaptations in implementation of IY. Adaptations fit into two broad categories: modification of programme delivery and modification of programme content. Within each of these categories modifications included organisation‐driven adaptations, provider‐driven adaptations, and consumer‐driven adaptations.

Practical implications

Changes to evidence‐based practice generally take two forms – adaptations consistent with model intent and theoretical approach and changes that represent drift from core elements of the EBP. The challenge for implementation science is to develop frameworks in which models can be adapted enough to make them viable for the service context (or the service context adapted to fit the model), yet avoid drift and maintain fidelity. Attending to the complexities of adaptation prior to and during implementation in a planned way is likely to help organisations better utilise EBPs to meet their unique needs while maintaining fidelity.

Originality/value

The paper shows that identification of types of intervention adaptations and drift allows for consideration of systematic approaches, frameworks, and processes to increase adherence during EBP implementation in community mental health and substance abuse treatment settings.

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Anita Helen Harris

Research has shown mindfulness-based therapies to be an effective therapeutic intervention for a wide range of illnesses and disorders. However, little is known about how…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has shown mindfulness-based therapies to be an effective therapeutic intervention for a wide range of illnesses and disorders. However, little is known about how it may be helpful to individuals with addiction problems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate by qualitative approach the impact of the newly introduced mindfulness-based relapse prevention programme (MBRP) programme on the TC to which it was introduced and to explore clients perception of and attitude to the programme. More specifically it aimed to examine how it may be helpful for individuals with substance abuse problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was drew upon using both focus group methods and individual semi-structured interviews with clients of the TC to which it was introduced. Thematic analysis was performed on data collected.

Findings

Notwithstanding implementation issues, findings suggest MBRP to be a valuable and worthwhile programme with real perceived benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Clients’ detoxing cited real perceived gains as a result of participating which has clear implications for a TC which offers methadone detoxification.

Originality/value

It is noted that MBRP research is in its infancy, and whilst a number of quantitative studies have been carried out, little qualitative research exists. If MBRP is to be considered an effective relapse prevention strategy, research must clarify the process underlying participant’s use of mindfulness in a drug-free setting.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Jayantha Wadu Mesthrige and Hei Lam Poon

The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of revitalization of old industrial buildings on the market value of the neighbourhood residential properties. Hong…

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1053

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of revitalization of old industrial buildings on the market value of the neighbourhood residential properties. Hong Kong’s economy has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past three decades. The most visible phenomenon in this transformation is the relocation of traditional manufacturing activities from Hong Kong to China since the 1990s. This has led many of the old industrial buildings in Hong Kong to be empty/underutilized and dilapidated. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government launched the “Revitalizing Industrial Buildings Policy” to revitalize these underutilized properties with the aim to provide suitable land and premises to meet local’s economic and social needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a hedonic price model to determine whether there is a relationship between revitalization projects and neighbourhood residential property values and the influence of revitalization programmes on the residential property price if there is such a relationship. The study is based on a sample of 4,015 residential transactions obtained from the residential developments located near three large-scale revitalization projects in an old industrial district, Kwun Tong.

Findings

Empirical findings suggest that revitalization programmes have not brought net positive price effects on the value of neighbourhood residential properties. This is in line with findings of some previous studies. However, it reveals that both the mode and scale of revitalization projects have different impacts on the neighbourhood: wholesale conversion has less negative impacts compared with redevelopment, while the larger the scale of a revitalization programme, the greater are the negative impacts on nearby property values. The study also finds that negative externalities generated by the revitalization during and post-revitalization stages are almost similar in magnitudes.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that industrial revitalization projects located adjacent to residential developments both reduce the value of the latter and discourage potential property buyers. The negative public perception of these properties diminishes their value and hence decreases the value of the property.

Practical implications

The paper raises the concern about the importance of adequately addressing issues of planning and zoning to minimize the negative externalities arising from urban renewal projects.

Originality/value

This research paper is first of its kind to analyze the effects of revitalized industrial buildings on the value of neighbourhood properties in Hong Kong. The tangible benefits identified in this study would be incentives, or otherwise, to motivate the revitalization policy in general.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Jason Combs, Michelle L. Boettcher, Amber Lange and Sara Hanks

This chapter provides insight into unique experiences of and provides special considerations for working with rural African American high school and college students. The…

Abstract

This chapter provides insight into unique experiences of and provides special considerations for working with rural African American high school and college students. The Emerging Scholars (ES) program has evolved over 17 years as the coordinators built relationships with rural and underserved communities. By examining this model, other programs will be provided with ideas, and the complexity, challenges, and opportunities of the work will be highlighted.

Building programs connecting rural and university teams and communities is neither easy nor prescriptive. By considering specific needs of students, families, schools, and universities, and geographical, political, historical, and cultural contexts, sustainable programs can be developed.

Additionally, this chapter includes a personal narrative from a graduate of the program who now works as an ES staff member. This perspective adds depth and a personal examination of the program's impact. Finally, the chapter concludes with a list of questions and considerations in building, enhancing, or maintaining campus–community partnerships in support of African American rural students.

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Ian Barron and David Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to assess unit manager perspectives on the introduction of a group-based trauma-specific programme delivered across Scotland’s secure estate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess unit manager perspectives on the introduction of a group-based trauma-specific programme delivered across Scotland’s secure estate. As this was the first time such an estate-wide initiative had occurred, it was important to identify the benefits/challenges at a strategic level.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative case study was utilised involving semi-structured interviews with five senior unit managers in three secure units to discover their perceptions of the benefits and challenges of implementing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT). A quasi-qualitative analysis was used to quantify and give meaning to manager responses. Inter-rater reliability of analysis was assessed.

Findings

Unit managers perceived gains in trauma-informed knowledge for themselves, and knowledge and skills gains for programme workers, care staff and adolescents. Challenges involved: managing a shift in paradigm to include a trauma-specific programme; the limiting context of competitive tendering; short duration placements; and the need for psychoeducation for staff, parents and agencies.

Research limitations/implications

Large sample sizes are likely to identify further issues for unit managers. Manager perceptions need directly compared with staff and adolescent perceptions and included in randomised control trials of trauma-specific programmes.

Practical implications

Managers perceived that TRT needed to be delivered within trauma-informed organisations and identified the need for manager training in traumatisation, trauma recovery and organisational implications to guide strategic planning. Managers emphasised the need for psychoeducation for families, staff and agencies.

Originality/value

The current study is the first in Scotland to explore unit manager experience of introducing a trauma-specific programme across the secure estate.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Kamal Gulati, Angel Rajan Singh, Sachin Kumar, Vivek Verma, Shakti Kumar Gupta and Chitra Sarkar

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leadership development programme on enhancing leadership competencies of physicians in India. Assessment of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leadership development programme on enhancing leadership competencies of physicians in India. Assessment of leadership competencies of physicians is critical for designing suitable leadership development programmes. The previous studies of authors have revealed significant gaps in leadership competencies among physicians in India. Hence, authors have designed a programme incorporating various facets of health-care leadership and evaluated its impact on improvement of leadership competencies of top- and mid-career level professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A six-day offsite residential programme incorporating a three-day component of leadership development was organized, in which 96 physicians participated. A mix of pedagogical approaches was used. A pre- and post-assessment of 30 medical leadership competencies was done using a self-administered questionnaire.

Findings

Majority of participants (69%) scored their competencies at Level 3 and Level 4 (Average to Good) with a mean score ranging from 3.20 ± 0.85 to 4.12 ± 0.71 in the pre-assessment group. In contrast, in post-assessment, this shifted to Level 4 and Level 5 (Good to Very good) in 72% with mean scores ranging from 3.8 to 4.24. Statistically significant differentiation was noted in pre- and post-assessment mean scores for all 30 competencies. The maximum improvement was noted in Competency 29 “Information management system planning and implementation”, whereas the least improvement was noted in Competency 12 “Holding self and others accountable and responsible for organizational goal attainment”.

Originality/value

The authors believe that this is the first study from India to assess effectiveness of leadership development programmes on enhancing medical leadership competencies demonstrating positive outcome. The findings of this study can provide a roadmap for designing of future medical leadership development programmes for physicians in India.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

James McAlexander, Rachel Nelson and Chris Bates

Entrepreneurship is a source of innovation, job creation, and vibrancy for local and regional economies. As a direct result, there is a profound interest in creating an…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship is a source of innovation, job creation, and vibrancy for local and regional economies. As a direct result, there is a profound interest in creating an infrastructure that effectively encourages entrepreneurship and incubates entrepreneurial endeavors. Western State University has responded to this call by developing the Harvey Entrepreneurship Program, which is integrated in the Enterprise Residential College.The Harvey program provides a socially embedded experiential learning approach to entrepreneurial education. Faculty, students, entrepreneurs, and technical experts are drawn together in an environment that provides space for business incubators and an entrepreneurially focused curriculum. In this article, we present a case study in which we use qualitative research methods to explore the benefits and challenges of creating such a program.The delivery model that Enterprise Residential College provides for entrepreneurial education is examined through the perspectives of program administrators, faculty, and students. The findings reveal evidence that a residential college can form a powerful nexus of formal instruction, experiential learning, socialization, and networking to influence entrepreneurship. We discuss relevant findings that may aid others considering similar endeavors.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Dina Williams, Kelly Smith, Naveed Yasin and Ian Pitchford

– The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the state of enterprise education and skills training at postgraduate level at UK higher education institutions (HEIs).

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2097

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the state of enterprise education and skills training at postgraduate level at UK higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

A case-study research strategy was used to address the lack of existing research on enterprise training for postgraduate researchers (PGRs). The initial task was to identify those UK universities which provide enterprise and entrepreneurship training for their PGRs. Based on this desk exercise, five universities were selected according to the nature and structure of their training programmes and geographical spread such that one university was included from Wales, Scotland, South of England, Midlands and North of England. The next stage of the research focused on gaining in-depth understanding of the enterprise training available to PRGs at selected universities through face-to-face semi-structured interviews with key personnel responsible for the design and management of PGR enterprise education programmes. The data collected were analysed using the Rugby Team Impact Framework to explore the training and development provision and structure, internal and external profile raising and awareness, staff and skills required, research-based practices, the reaction of participants, behaviour and outcomes, stakeholder engagement and on-going strategy.

Findings

The paper highlights the current best practices in enterprise education for PGRs. It identified key factors contributing to the success of selected programmes including the development of objectives, the modes and pedagogy of delivery and the involvement of stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the research enable universities across the UK to drive the development of a suite of learning opportunities tailored to the needs of the PGR population in order to overcome barriers to engagement and best promote entrepreneurial activity – both within employment and as new venture creation – as appropriate career options.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the limited literature concerning the state of enterprise training for PGRs which provides a detail analysis of current provisions useful for benchmarking and planning purposes and which can be useful to researchers and enterprise education providers.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Albert A. Vicere and Virginia T. Freeman

Executive education can be a powerfulcatalyst for both personal andorganisational development. Howcorporations are utilising this potentialwas the subject of an…

Abstract

Executive education can be a powerful catalyst for both personal and organisational development. How corporations are utilising this potential was the subject of an international study of executive education trends among the Fortune 300, Fortune Service 100, and Fortune International 100 firms. The results of the study reflect expanding corporate support for executive education, both on an in‐company basis and through university‐based programmes. The results also suggest some interesting comparisons among the executive education practices of the three survey population subgroupings.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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