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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Ricardo Mateo, Martín Tanco and Javier Santos

This research paper aims to explore how intranet mechanisms for knowledge transfer in a multinational automotive company can be improved with the inclusion of a human

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1604

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to explore how intranet mechanisms for knowledge transfer in a multinational automotive company can be improved with the inclusion of a human interface, specifically a resident engineer. A resident engineer is an assembly line employee who spends the majority of their time in the Advanced Engineering Center, which aims to improve knowledge transfer through face‐to‐face interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A multinational automotive company was selected for the study. Six years of data containing all product modifications were analyzed.

Findings

The paper concludes that electronic knowledge transfer can be significantly improved when resident engineers physically interact with the Advanced Engineering Center. Intranet knowledge transfer alone cannot overcome the considerable handicap involved in knowledge assimilation.

Practical implications

For companies with Advanced Engineering Centers located far from assembly‐line plants, the creation of specific human mechanisms to explain the knowledge generated and to reduce approval time is indispensable.

Originality/value

This research paper features a complete case study from a multinational automotive company with more than 800 analyzed modifications.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Low Sui Pheng and Goh Kok Hwa

Although quality assurance (QA) was introduced more than a decade ago inthe UK, the implementation of QA systems in the Singapore constructionindustry is still a…

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2305

Abstract

Although quality assurance (QA) was introduced more than a decade ago in the UK, the implementation of QA systems in the Singapore construction industry is still a relatively new phenomenon. While QA is now slowly making its presence felt in the Singapore construction industry over the past two years, there has been a lack of study of the problems faced by practitioners in implementing QA for building projects at its infancy stage in the industry. Examines the problems faced during this infancy stage and draws lessons therefrom.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2019

Moza Tahnoon Al Nahyan, Amrik Sohal, Yaser Hawas and Brian Fildes

This paper aims to examine four key management processes, namely, communication, coordination, decision-making and knowledge-sharing, to determine how these impact on…

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1720

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine four key management processes, namely, communication, coordination, decision-making and knowledge-sharing, to determine how these impact on transportation infrastructure project success. The context for this study is the construction of a major highway in the United Arab Emirates.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple sources of data are used in this case study that include the following: examination of various documents relating to the project in question; interviews with ten key stakeholders involved with the construction of the project; observations made during the site visit and interviews conducted with four site engineers; a focus group conducted with six key stakeholders involved in the project; and finally interviews conducted with the Minister of Public Works and the Director-General of the Ministry of Public Works. Analysis was conducted using NVivo.

Findings

Identification and involvement of key stakeholders, particularly in the early phases of a construction project, is found to be highly critical. Managers must develop detailed understanding of stakeholders’ influence in terms of their legitimacy, power and urgency in achieving effectiveness of the management processes.

Originality/value

The study highlights how different stakeholders influence communication, coordination, decision-making and knowledge-sharing at different stages of the construction project. Hence, understanding stakeholder’s level of legitimacy, power and urgency across the different stages of a project is highly critical.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Manuel Alexander Silverio-Fernandez, Suresh Renukappa and Subashini Suresh

The decentralisation of information and high rate of mobile content access in the construction industry provides an ideal scenario for improvement of processes via the…

Abstract

Purpose

The decentralisation of information and high rate of mobile content access in the construction industry provides an ideal scenario for improvement of processes via the implementation of the paradigm of the Internet of Things (IoT). Smart devices are considered as the objects interconnected in the IoT; therefore, they play a fundamental role in the implementation of digital solutions during the execution of construction projects. The purpose of this paper is to assess the critical factors for a successful implementation of smart devices in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was performed in the Dominican Republic. This country, located at the heart of the Caribbean, presents an economy that strongly relies on the construction industry. Following a systematic approach, a qualitative data collection and analysis was performed based on semi-structured interviews and content analysis to professionals of construction companies in the Dominican Republic, enquiring the concept of smart devices and critical success factors for implementing the devices in the industry.

Findings

The key success factors obtained from the contestants were leadership, technology awareness, company size, usability of proposed solution, cost of implementation and interoperability.

Originality/value

This paper provides information to clients of the construction sector regarding the benefits of embedding smart devices into their business activities. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of the key factors to be considered by construction organisations when embedding smart devices into their projects. This study also provides recommendations for distinct stakeholders of the construction sector, such as policy makers, clients and technology consultants. Policy makers should especially consider factors such as technology awareness and leadership to develop the right policies for the integration of the IoT in construction projects. Technology consultants should be aware of the latest case studies of successful implementation of smart devices and IoT systems in the world in order to adapt and implement smart devices and IoT in their projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Yan Jin and Paulette Edmunds

Collaboration in supply chain networks (SCN) becomes extremely important for manufacturers seeking a sustainable competitive advantage. Such competitiveness depends on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration in supply chain networks (SCN) becomes extremely important for manufacturers seeking a sustainable competitive advantage. Such competitiveness depends on the SCN resources a manufacturing firm can allocate, the capabilities to identify and deploy these network resources effectively, and practices and applications the firm arranges for these resources. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework that investigates the relationships between these network constructs and their influences on firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review of supply chain management was conducted to explicate why some manufacturers outperform others. A resource-based view, dynamic capability theory, and extended resource-based view were employed to develop a conceptual model that investigates relationships between the resources, capabilities, and practices of a SCN. The relationships were then examined to analyze their influences on firm performance. Several cases and practical examples were included in the study to give a better understanding of the conceptual research model. Various keywords were used in searching literature for the constructs of the research model. For example, “knowledge” and “supply chain network” were used to search the literature regarding the SCN intangible resources.

Findings

This study uses a conceptual model to identify SCN resources that are dispersed in the internal territory among different network members, SCN capabilities that are developed based on these network resources and lead to the firm’s competitive performance, and SCN practices used to acquire network resources and build network capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model of SCN resources, capabilities, and practices needs further empirical validation.

Practical implications

The conceptual model provides a framework for managers to identify the critical resources, capabilities, and practices of a SCN that help a firm achieve sustainable competitive performance.

Originality/value

This research builds a comprehensive picture of relationships between a manufacturing firm’s strategic resources, capabilities, and practices in a SCN. It also provides a theoretical foundation for future research on developing instruments for resources, practices, and capabilities of a SCN and empirically testing the relationships among the appropriate constructs.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1972

Reid, Morris of Borth‐y‐Gest, Diplock, Simon of Glaisdale and Kilbrandon

March 15, 1972 Revenue — Selective employment tax — Premium — Manufacturers of plant — Sites for construction, erection and repair of plant — Regional employment payments…

Abstract

March 15, 1972 Revenue — Selective employment tax — Premium — Manufacturers of plant — Sites for construction, erection and repair of plant — Regional employment payments — Main establishment within development area — Sites of work outside development area — Whether employment of employees on sites carried out in or from establishment wholly within development area — Selective Employment Payments Act, 1966 (c.32), s.l (1), (2), — Finance Act, 1967 (c.54), s.26(l) — Revenue Act, 1968 (c.l1), s.l(2).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Manuel Alexander Silverio-Fernández, Suresh Renukappa and Subashini Suresh

The decentralisation of information and high rate of mobile content access in the construction industry provide an ideal scenario for improvement of processes via the…

Abstract

Purpose

The decentralisation of information and high rate of mobile content access in the construction industry provide an ideal scenario for improvement of processes via the implementation of the paradigm of the Internet of Things (IoT). Smart devices are considered as the objects interconnected in the IoT; therefore, they play a fundamental role in the digital transformation of the construction industry. Currently, there is a lack of guidelines regarding the implementation of smart devices for digitalisation in the construction industry. Consequently, this paper aims to provide a set of guidelines for implementing smart devices in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was performed in the UK and the Dominican Republic (DR). Following a systematic approach, qualitative data collection and analysis was performed based on semi-structured interviews involving professionals from construction companies in the UK and the DR. Interviews were recorded and subsequently transcribed using Microsoft Word and exported to the software NVivo, where the software was used to find common thematic nodes across all interviews.

Findings

The findings encompass drivers, challenges and critical success factors (CSFs) for implementing smart devices in construction project. For both countries, the top five CSFs were leadership, staff training, culture, technology awareness and cost of implementation. These findings were used to develop a strategic framework for implementing smart devices in construction companies. The framework establishes the actors, elements and actions to be considered by construction companies when implementing smart devices.

Originality/value

This paper provides a richer insight into the understanding and awareness of implementing smart devices. A strategic framework for implementing smart devices in the construction industry and providing guidelines for adopting smart devices in construction projects was developed and validated. This study provides a better understanding of the key factors to be considered by construction companies when embedding smart devices into their projects.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Ali Mohammed Alashwal and Hamzah Abdul-Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to determine the measurement constructs of learning within construction projects' milieu. The literature indicated some mechanisms of learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the measurement constructs of learning within construction projects' milieu. The literature indicated some mechanisms of learning in projects under four aspects, namely knowledge sharing, knowledge creation, team action to learn, and learning support. The empirical study attempts to verify whether intra-project learning can be measured through these aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey method to collect the data from 36 mega-sized building projects in Malaysia. In total, 203 questionnaires were collected from professionals working in the sites of these projects. The data were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the constructs of intra-project learning. Partial least squares-path modeling was used then to confirm the results of PCA and determine the contribution of each construct to intra-project learning.

Findings

The results affirmed two constructs of intra-project learning, named, social and technical and each consisted of four indicators of learning.

Originality/value

The paper emphasized the socio-technical perspective of learning and contributed to developing a hierarchical measurement model of learning in construction project. A project manager can propose new initiatives in response to the new perspective of learning for team building and continuous development. Lastly, the paper provides a comprehensive presentation of how to estimate the hierarchical measurement models of project learning as a latent variable.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Ana Karina Silverio and Subashini Suresh

The increased use and proven benefits of building information modelling (BIM) worldwide suggest that its implementation could be of great help in diminishing inefficient…

Abstract

Purpose

The increased use and proven benefits of building information modelling (BIM) worldwide suggest that its implementation could be of great help in diminishing inefficient traditional practices in the Dominican Republic (DR) construction industry. However, there is no empirical work about the implementation of BIM in the country. This study aims to critically appraise and document the status of the implementation of BIM in the DR to raise awareness and understand how BIM can be successfully implemented in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted in which data was collected through semi-structured interviews, with the participation of 53 professionals from 36 construction organisations. The data collected was analysed with the method of content analysis.

Findings

The results confirmed that the DR is a BIM infant country. There are low levels of BIM implementation. The reasons why BIM is not implemented are explored, and a significant interest in implementing BIM in the future was also reported. Drivers to implement BIM include BIM benefits, competitive advantage and pressure from external partners. Current BIM approaches are mainly single-disciplinary, principally in architecture, and the effectiveness and scope of implementation are highly affected by intra-organisational and inter-organisational barriers.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research about the implementation of BIM in the DR. This study bridges this research gap by collecting primary data from Dominican construction organisations and construction professionals to report findings related to BIM implementation.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Mohamad AL‐Najem, Hom Dhakal, Ashraf Labib and Nick Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement framework to evaluate the lean readiness level (LRL) and lean systems (LS) within Kuwaiti small and medium‐sized…

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1239

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement framework to evaluate the lean readiness level (LRL) and lean systems (LS) within Kuwaiti small and medium‐sized manufacturing industries (K‐SMMIs). A measurement framework which encompasses the quality practices related to LS (processes; planning and control; human resources; top management and leadership; customer relations; and supplier relations) is used to assess the quality practices in K‐SMMIs and determine whether they have the foundation to implement LS.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review, semi‐structured interviews with 27 senior managers, and a quantitative survey administered to 50 K‐SMMIs. The responses were entered into SPSS software to conduct a reliability test and independent sample t‐test.

Findings

The results indicate that current quality practices within K‐SMMIs are not very supportive towards LS. Many factors are revealed to affect K‐SMMIs with respect to LS, including language barriers, and deficiencies in aspects including quality workers in terms of education and skills; technology; government attention; know‐how regarding LS; market competitiveness; and urgency for adopting LS.

Research limitations/implications

Very limited information is available on LS and QI in Kuwait. The LRL framework should be tested in small and medium‐sized manufacturing industries (SMMIs) that successfully use LS, in order to provide a benchmark. The study's findings can be used as an internal checklist prior to and during lean implementation.

Originality/value

This LS and LRL measurement framework relating to K‐SMMIs represents a unique effort in the area of lean management.

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