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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Kaushal Keraminiyage and Pantip Piyatadsananon

While the top-down approach to design and implement post-disaster resettlement programmes are often influenced by spatial factors such as land availability and access to…

Abstract

Purpose

While the top-down approach to design and implement post-disaster resettlement programmes are often influenced by spatial factors such as land availability and access to infrastructure facilities, failure to recognise socio-economic and cultural sensitivities of resettling communities have been noted as a common reason for unsuccessful resettlement programmes. Since these socio-economic and political issues are not mutually exclusive from spatial factors, the aim of this research is to develop a framework to assist the design and implementation of better post-disaster resettlement programmes through better coordination between spatial and socio-economic/cultural factors.

Design/methodology/approach

An initial theoretical framework was developed through a comprehensive literature review followed by a validation through a case study approach.

Findings

During the theoretical framework development, the differentiating priorities of policy maker's viewpoint and resettling community's viewpoints have been established as key theoretical constructs, within the emergency, transitional, and potential development phases of post-disaster resettlement programmes. Further, spatial analysis has been identified as an effective technique that can be used to investigate the interdependencies between the spatial, socio-economic and cultural factors within the post-disaster resettlement programmes. The case study findings confirmed that spatial analysis indeed can be used effectively to evaluate the above mentioned interdependencies within the context of post-debris flow event disaster resettlement programmes.

Originality/value

It is expected that the developed framework can be used by authorities and policy makers who are designing and implementing resettlement programmes to evaluate how the spatial design of the programme can be used to minimise socio-economic and cultural issues of settling communities.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

John Cusworth

The land resettlement programme in Zimbabwe was undertaken not justas a land redistribution exercise but as a carefully planned and manageddevelopment programme. Despite…

Abstract

The land resettlement programme in Zimbabwe was undertaken not just as a land redistribution exercise but as a carefully planned and managed development programme. Despite the problems of adjusting government institutions to independence, an organisational framework was successfully established to plan and implement resettlement. This owed much to the fact that implementing resettlement was consistent with each institution′s objectives. On the other hand, the early economic success of the programme has become increasingly jeopardised as the institutions′ requirement for programme operation has not been matched by that for planning and implementation. An understanding of the organisational objectives of individual institutions can go some way to explain this. The experience of resettlement in Zimbabwe may not be unique and the experience will add to the increased emphasis being given in agricultural development to the establishment of appropriate farmer‐oriented institutions at the local level.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Judy Renshaw

Resettlement programmes provide support for young offenders during their custodial sentence and for approximately nine months after release. This article describes how the…

Abstract

Resettlement programmes provide support for young offenders during their custodial sentence and for approximately nine months after release. This article describes how the costs and benefits of providing an effective service of this kind were estimated based on the ‘RESET’ programme, published evidence on the costs of crime and the likely reduction in offending due to an intensive support programme. The cost of crime has been estimated at £46,459 per year (after allowing for a reduction due to the time spent in custody), plus prison custody at an average of £30,475 and emergency accommodation at an average of £1,106, making a total of £78,040 for each offender. Using a fairly modest assumption that good support in resettlement could lead to approximately a 35% reduction in frequency and a 10% reduction in seriousness of offending, a saving of £20,407 per offender per year could be achieved. These savings would more than offset the average cost of a good quality resettlement service of £8,074. The scheme would break even if the frequency of offending were reduced by only 20%.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Yong Chen, Lulu He and Dan Zhou

Post-disaster population resettlement is a complicated process, during which the restoration of livelihood and lifestyle plays a critical role in achieving a successful…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-disaster population resettlement is a complicated process, during which the restoration of livelihood and lifestyle plays a critical role in achieving a successful resettlement outcome. This paper attempts to examine how recovery policies and relocation approaches influence people's livelihood recovery and perception of wellbeing. It specifically investigates the role of farmland in producing a livelihood and maintaining a rural lifestyle among displaced people.

Design/methodology/approach

Through face-to-face questionnaire surveys and in-depth interviews with rural residents displaced from their villages after the Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan, China, this study presents both quantitative and qualitative evidence to investigate how post-disaster policies and particularly the availability of farmland influence people's recovery and their satisfaction with the post-resettlement life.

Findings

Data suggest that availability of farmland, in spite of the size, makes big differences in post-disaster recovery because farmland provides resettled people with not only a livelihood to secure basic living but also a guarantee to maintain a rural lifestyle.

Research limitations/implications

More samples are needed for analyzing factors that significantly influence disaster-displaced farmers' recovery and wellbeing post resettlement.

Practical implications

This study can be used as an important reference for making plans for post-disaster recovery and population resettlement programs in other disaster-prone countries across the world.

Originality/value

Land-based relocation is proposed as a desirable approach to addressing challenges of livelihood restoration amongst the resettled population in rural areas of developing countries.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Ray Higgins

Reports on an inter‐agency initiative in Wakefield that used aneeds‐led case management approach for the resettlement of 32 formerusers of long‐term hospital mental health…

Abstract

Reports on an inter‐agency initiative in Wakefield that used a needs‐led case management approach for the resettlement of 32 former users of long‐term hospital mental health services. Reviews the programme using headings provided by the values which underpinned local mental health services, namely, that services should endeavour to be appropriate, acceptable, accessible, effective/efficient and equitable for service users. The main objective of the programme was achieved – 32 former users of hospital mental health services were resettled. Issues were, however, raised concerning the extent to which the programme could be described as needs‐led. Concludes that there is still much to learn about the application of case management within the British health context.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

John Dalrymple

Knowledge of what makes for quality in adult learning disabilities services does not cascade directly down into grassroots practice. It is instead severely filtered and…

Abstract

Knowledge of what makes for quality in adult learning disabilities services does not cascade directly down into grassroots practice. It is instead severely filtered and variously diluted through layers of national policy, local strategy and administrative complexity. In the current difficult climate, quality is not obtained without exposure to the strains and stresses inherent in the dynamics of the health and welfare bureaucracies and their attempts at partnership. Following a largely chronological and descriptive account of attempts to change and develop services in the Greater Glasgow area in the mid‐1990s, consideration is given to the effect of these ‘filters’ in the context of the Greater Glasgow Joint Learning Disability Project.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 April 2021

This is not the first time Kenya has taken aim at the refugee camps it hosts; it has been pushing to close them since 2013.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB260654

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Paul Wishart

THE RE‐EMERGENCE OF THE public health agenda and the continued high level of scrutiny of the outcomes of activities in the public sector have created the need to try and…

Abstract

THE RE‐EMERGENCE OF THE public health agenda and the continued high level of scrutiny of the outcomes of activities in the public sector have created the need to try and work towards agreement on what a ‘healthy housing policy’ might look like. This in turn leads to a requirement for broad agreement on the mechanisms to be used to measure the impact of operational policies in this area. The paper explores the background to these shifts in social policy and offers some thoughts on healthy housing policies for practitioners to consider.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Fredrik Lindencrona and Solvig Ekblad

In order to investigate the potential of refugee resettlement programmes as mental healthpromoting settings, this study examines resettlement staff's constructions of…

Abstract

In order to investigate the potential of refugee resettlement programmes as mental healthpromoting settings, this study examines resettlement staff's constructions of refugees' health in everyday episodes within the resettlement programme. Everyday episodes relating to refugees' health were collected through individual and group interviews with 28 members of staff, and analysed using grounded theory methodology. The constructions of health in these episodes focused on mental health, the latter understood as a concept stressing the dynamic fit between person, programme and external environment. If a comprehensive strategy focusing on creating mental health among refugees through inter‐sectoral co‐ordination is developed, resettlement programmes can probably be developed into mental health‐promoting settings. The model proposed in this paper could be a good starting point to further this programme and policy development.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Iftekhar Ahmed and Darryn McEvoy

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built…

Abstract

Purpose

After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, major resettlement programmes were implemented in the affected countries including Sri Lanka and India. New settlements were built from scratch on vacant land, which consisted of building new houses and provision of infrastructure and services. Some of these programmes in Sri Lanka and India were reviewed in an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded research and this paper presents and analyses some of the findings of the research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on interviews of residents and representatives of agencies involved in planning and implementing the resettlement programmes, and on-site observations. The investigation examined critical aspects of settlement development including site planning, transport, drainage, water supply, sanitation, waste management and security.

Findings

Very little site planning guidelines were available specifically for resettlement programmes; in both the case study countries, general planning guidelines were applied. Provision and management of infrastructure and services presents great challenges in developing countries as high capital investment and good technical skills for design, implementation and maintenance are required. Some of the resettlement schemes had the advantage of being centrally located and hence had access to schools, health centres and other facilities. However, others were in isolated locations and beneficiaries faced problems in accessing basic facilities. Drainage was a problem – most schemes did not have any surface drainage plan; low areas had not been elevated, slopes not levelled, and land not compacted before construction. Electricity and water supply had been provided in all the programmes, but conditions and quality varied. In many of the schemes, sanitation presented a problem. However, in Chennai, the sewage system worked well and this was one achievement all interview respondents praised. Solid waste management and security posed additional problems.

Originality/value

In the global context of increasing frequency and intensity of disasters due to climate change, adequate planning and implementation of reconstruction and resettlement programmes has become more important than ever. In this regard, the lessons gained in this paper should be of value and can provide guidance to post-disaster resettlement programmes in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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