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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Janet A. Boekhorst, Parbudyal Singh and Ronald Burke

The purpose of this paper is to examine a moderated mediation model that investigated the moderating role of psychological detachment in the relationship between work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a moderated mediation model that investigated the moderating role of psychological detachment in the relationship between work intensity and life satisfaction via emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 149 hospital-based nurses who completed a questionnaire about working conditions and individual outcomes. The data were analyzed using hierarchical moderated regression and bootstrapping techniques.

Findings

The results confirm that work intensity is negatively related to life satisfaction via emotional exhaustion. The results also demonstrate that psychological detachment diminishes the negative influence of emotional exhaustion on life satisfaction. The conditional indirect effect model shows that the indirect relationship between work intensity and life satisfaction is strongest at low psychological detachment.

Research limitations/implications

This research advances our understanding of the negative work and non-work implications associated with work intensity. The key limitation of this research was the cross-sectional data set. HRM researchers should seek to replicate and expand the results with multi-wave data to extend our understanding of the implications of work intensity.

Practical implications

HRM practitioners need to begin implementing measures to address work intensity in order to thwart its negative effects. HRM practitioners need to implement policies and procedures that limit the intensity of work demands to promote positive employee work and non-work outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show that work intensity can influence life satisfaction through emotional exhaustion. Contrary to most recovery research, this research is also among the first to focus on the moderating role of psychological detachment, especially within a conditional indirect effect model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Dirk Frantzen

This study seeks to analyse the relation between technology, competitiveness and specialisation in OECD manufacturing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to analyse the relation between technology, competitiveness and specialisation in OECD manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

A regression analysis is first performed explaining the disaggregate manufacturing relative value added market share performance of a series of OECD countries by their relative unit labour costs (ULC), relative own and foreign research intensity and by a catch up term. Estimates are then presented of equations relating an indicator of revealed comparative advantage of value added to similar measures of comparative performance of ULC, or of its component terms, and of R&D expenditure, and the respective results are considered in conjunction.

Findings

The results show that, although each time there is evidence of a negative impact of the ULC‐based variables, the influence of the technology variables is far more important. Re‐estimation on research‐intensive and less research‐intensive samples shows that the dominance of the technology factors is especially important in the research‐intensive industries. The influence of comparative wages on specialisation is, moreover, found to be positive here, suggesting the presence of a significant labour skill effect.

Originality/value

The paper confirms the Schumpeterian insights, which have emphasised the relation between technology, competitiveness and specialisation. It stresses the dominance of product qualitative aspects of competitiveness, especially in research‐intensive industries.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Yiyi Su and Taoyong Su

This paper aims to examine the behavioral determinants of firm research and development (R&D) investment in China by looking into the interaction between performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the behavioral determinants of firm research and development (R&D) investment in China by looking into the interaction between performance aspiration and industrial search.

Design/methodology/approach

The author argues that the performance aspiration effect is strengthened in R&D-intensive industries based on the isomorphism rationale, whereas it is weakened by high industry R&D intensity owing to the differentiation rationale. Deriving from the isomorphism and differentiation rationales, the author developed a set of competitive hypotheses and empirically tested them by using a large panel data of 6,539 company-years from China for the period 2001-2003.

Findings

First, R&D intensity is positively related to the deviation of firm performance from aspiration. Second, industry R&D intensity negatively moderates the relationship between performance aspiration and firm R&D intensity for firms performing above aspiration. Therefore, the results provide support for the differentiation rationale.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the ongoing research that provides and tests the behavioral explanations for R&D and innovation. By delving into the moderating role of industry R&D intensity, the author advocate the need for contextualizing performance aspiration in industrial environments. The study informs policymakers and business leaders about the interaction between the external environment and internal decision process in R&D investment decision.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Elitza Iordanova and Dimitrios Stylidis

This study aims to shed some light on destination image formation by exploring whether image is altered as a result of tourists’ experience intensity with a destination.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to shed some light on destination image formation by exploring whether image is altered as a result of tourists’ experience intensity with a destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A visitor experience intensity index was developed based on the amount of events and attractions visitors have already attended/visited or were planning to attend/visit during their stay. The data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and the total sample consisted of 400 tourists in Linz, Austria. Principal component analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant analysis were applied to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings indicate that the higher the experience intensity score, the more favourable the cognitive and affective evaluations of destination image, indicating that tourists’ experiences are central in the formation of the in situ image.

Research limitations/implications

The “level of psychological involvement” with the destination should be considered by future studies, as this paper focussed on level of experience intensity.

Practical implications

This paper supports the effective and innovative solutions for place marketing and branding of tourist destinations such as promoting experiences that further enhance destination image. The study also assists places with bad reputation or negative image, like the selected case study (Linz, Austria), in repositioning themselves as attractive experience providers.

Originality/value

The paper’s originality lies in applying “mere exposure theory” in tourism and using an innovative way of measuring tourists’ experience through an intensity index. The study addresses a significant, but still neglected image determinant, that of experience intensity, contributing to a better understanding of the in situ destination image formation process.

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Aswini Kumar Mishra, Abhishek Kumar Sinha, Abhijeet Khasnis and Sai Theja Vadlamani

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies three different types of innovation measures then further analyses their relation with the productivity of the firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for this study has incorporated the structural Crépon-Douget-Mairesse (CDM) model wherein productivity is measured using both the innovation inputs and the innovation outputs. Three main equations have been used to quantify this relation includes the knowledge intensity function, innovation function and the productivity equation.

Findings

Findings indicate that decision to invest in research and development (R&D) is influenced negatively by financial obstacles and trade obstacles and positively influenced by telecommunication obstacles, government obstacles and the size of the firm in India. Similarly, financial obstacles and the size of the firm are affecting the firm’s research expenditure per employee. Also, financial obstacles seem to hinder the research intensity and larger firms seem to have higher research intensity. The size of the firm contributes significantly to product innovation. However, R&D spending seems to be negatively related to the innovation outcome. The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms. However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner.

Originality/value

The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms (which has been measured by sales per worker is impacted by the capital and the labour inputs). However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner. The reason could be due to the fact that the definition of organisational innovation incorporates both dissolutions and mergers.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol

This paper examines the effect of improvisational behavior of entrepreneurs on firm performance of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand during the economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the effect of improvisational behavior of entrepreneurs on firm performance of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand during the economic crisis following the COVID-19 pandemic. The study also explores external factors in terms of competitive intensity and internal factors in terms of financial and human resources possessed by firms that could enhance the impact of improvisational behavior on firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered online questionnaire survey was used to collect the data from the random sample of 312 SMEs in Thailand. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The analysis supports the positive relationship between the improvisational behavior of entrepreneurs and firm performance. Moreover, the moderating effect analysis shows that the positive impact of improvisational behavior on firm performance tends to be stronger for firms that encountered a higher level of competitive intensity and for firms that possessed a higher level of financial and human resources.

Originality/value

This research extends the knowledge from prior research by confirming some moderating factors that could strengthen the benefit of improvisational behavior during the crisis.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Karen Ruckman

This paper empirically investigates the profit impact of externally sourcing technology through acquisition. Specifically, it questions whether biopharmaceutical acquirers…

Abstract

This paper empirically investigates the profit impact of externally sourcing technology through acquisition. Specifically, it questions whether biopharmaceutical acquirers benefit from taking over technologies which are pre-marketed more than those that have already been approved for market. This paper utilizes the resource-based view to determine that the decision depends on the relative value chains of the acquirer and target. We assert that companies with lower research and development (R&D) intensity than their targets benefit from acquisitions of pre-marketed drugs more than they would with marketed drugs because of a complementary combination of competitive assets. Estimations from the U.S. biopharmaceutical sector in the 1990s show that acquirers that take over pre-marketed drugs from targets with higher R&D intensity than themselves have post-acquisition returns between 2% and 11% higher than if they took over marketed drugs.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1381-5

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Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2015

Saptarshi Purkayastha, Tatiana S. Manolova and Linda F. Edelman

We combine insights from the strategic management and international business literatures in order to explore the moderating role of business group characteristics on the…

Abstract

We combine insights from the strategic management and international business literatures in order to explore the moderating role of business group characteristics on the link between innovation and internationalization in the context of the pharmaceutical sector in India. We test our three hypotheses on a sample of 219 Indian pharmaceutical firms affiliated with business groups, over a five-year period (2005–2010) in a panel of 1,096 firm-year observations. Results indicate that, contrary to our contention, research expenditure is negatively associated with export intensity, implying that firms in the Indian pharmaceutical sector may face a trade-off between investing in innovation and international expansion. As expected, business group characteristics significantly impact the strength of the relationship between innovation and internationalization. Theoretical and practitioner implications are discussed.

Details

Emerging Economies and Multinational Enterprises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-740-6

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Edward Levitas, Vincent L. Barker and Mujtaba Ahsan

Firms that pursue invention face special conditions that heighten the potential conflict between managers and shareholders. High R&D spending increases the information…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms that pursue invention face special conditions that heighten the potential conflict between managers and shareholders. High R&D spending increases the information asymmetry between managers and shareholders because the invention process is rooted in tacit knowledge. Because tacit knowledge is difficult to communicate to external parties, shareholders will have problems monitoring whether managers are spending R&D in a manner that maximizes firm value.

Design/methodology/approach

Using agency theory, it is argued that managerial ownership is one solution to this problem and that high levels of R&D intensity will necessitate high levels of managerial ownership to counteract agency problems. However, it is also argued based on signaling theory that a firm's patenting activity reduces ownership requirement as well as moderating the managerial ownership‐R&D relationship.

Findings

Using a sample of firms from the knowledge‐intensive biotechnology industry, a positive relationship was found between R&D spending and managerial ownership. It was also found that this relationship is most strongly moderated by patenting activity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings would be strengthened by replication using samples from other knowledge‐intensive industries. Future research should examine how the critical determinants of success in other industries affect managerial ownership of firms in those industries.

Practical implications

The study shows that top managers have some control over the contracting environment. By aggressively pursuing patents managers can reduce their level of ownership in the firm.

Originality/value

The study finds evidence that in order to prevent agency problems firms undertaking inventive activity may require their managers to take larger ownership or aggressively pursue patents. High managerial ownership levels and patents can provide a signal to shareholders about the growth potential of the firm.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Aws AlHares, Ahmed A. Elamer, Ibrahem Alshbili and Maha W. Moustafa

This study aims to examine the impact of board structure on risk-taking measured by research and development (R&D) intensity in OECD countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of board structure on risk-taking measured by research and development (R&D) intensity in OECD countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a panel data of 200 companies on Forbes global 2000 over the 2010-2014 period. It uses the ordinary least square multiple regression analysis techniques to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that the frequency of board meetings and board size are significantly and negatively related to risk-taking measured by R&D intensity, with a greater significance among Anglo-American countries than among Continental European countries. The rationale for this is that the legal and accounting systems in the Anglo American countries have greater protection through greater emphasis on compliance and disclosure, and therefore, allowing for less risk-taking.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could investigate risk-taking using different arrangements, conducting face-to-face meetings with the firm’s directors and shareholders.

Practical implications

The results suggest that better-governed firms at the firm- or national-level have a high expectancy of less risk-taking. These results offer regulators a resilient incentive to pursue corporate governance (CG) and disclosure reforms officially and mutually with national-level governance. Thus, these results show the monitoring and legitimacy benefits of governance, resulting in less risk-taking. Finally, the findings offer investors the opportunity to build specific expectations about risk-taking behaviour in terms of R&D intensity in OECD countries.

Originality/value

This study extends and contributes to the extant CG literature, by offering new evidence on the effect of board structure on risk-taking. The findings will help policymakers in different countries in estimating the sufficiency of the available CG reforms to prevent management mishandle and disgrace.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

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