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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Shawne D. Miksa

The purpose of this paper is to present the initial relationship between the Classification Research Group (CRG) and the Center for Documentation and Communication Research

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the initial relationship between the Classification Research Group (CRG) and the Center for Documentation and Communication Research (CDCR) and how this relationship changed between 1952 and 1970. The theory of normative behavior and its concepts of worldviews, social norms, social types, and information behavior are used to characterize the relationship between the small worlds of the two groups with the intent of understanding the gap between early classification research and information retrieval (IR) research.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a mixed method analysis of two groups as evidenced in published artifacts by and about their work. A thorough review of historical literature about the groups as well as their own published works was employed and an author co-citation analysis was used to characterize the conceptual similarities and differences of the two groups of researchers.

Findings

The CRG focused on fundamental principles to aid classification and retrieval of information. The CDCR were more inclined to develop practical methods of retrieval without benefit of good theoretical foundations. The CRG began it work under the contention that the general classification schemes at the time were inadequate for the developing IR mechanisms. The CDCR rejected the classification schemes of the times and focused on developing punch card mechanisms and processes that were generously funded by both government and corporate funding.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique historical analysis of two groups of influential researchers in the field of library and information science.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

CLARE BEGHTOL

Undiscovered public knowledge is a relatively unstudied phenomenon, and the few extended examples that have been published are intradisciplinary. This paper presents the…

Abstract

Undiscovered public knowledge is a relatively unstudied phenomenon, and the few extended examples that have been published are intradisciplinary. This paper presents the concept of ‘facet’ as an example of interdisciplinary undiscovered public knowledge. ‘Facets’ were central to the bibliographic classification theory of S.R. Ranganathan in India and to the behavioural research of L. Guttman in Israel. The term had the same meaning in both fields, and the concept was developed and exploited at about the same time in both, but two separate, unconnected literatures grew up around the term and its associated concepts. This paper examines the origins and parallel uses of the concept and the term in both fields as a case study of interdisciplinary knowledge that could have been, but was apparently not, discovered any time between the early 1950s and the present using simple, readily available information retrieval techniques.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Jack Andersen

The purpose is to map and discuss two schools of thought in knowledge organization research. The objective of this mapping is to examine the conceptual views and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to map and discuss two schools of thought in knowledge organization research. The objective of this mapping is to examine the conceptual views and the derived questions and concerns voiced in these two schools and whether they fit with concerns in contemporary digital culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a comparative analysis and discussion.

Findings

The comparative analysis and discussion point out the different sets of questions the two schools are concerned with distinct epistemological and ontological implications.

Originality/value

The originality of this article is the naming, mapping and discussion of two schools of research in knowledge with a view to how they fit with problems of ordering, archiving and searching in digital culture.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Michael Fellmann, Agnes Koschmider, Ralf Laue, Andreas Schoknecht and Arthur Vetter

Patterns have proven to be useful for documenting general reusable solutions to a commonly occurring problem. In recent years, several different business process…

Abstract

Purpose

Patterns have proven to be useful for documenting general reusable solutions to a commonly occurring problem. In recent years, several different business process management (BPM)-related patterns have been published. Despite the large number of publications on this subject, there is no work that provides a comprehensive overview and categorization of the published business process model patterns. The purpose of this paper is to close this gap by providing a taxonomy of patterns as well as a classification of 89 research works.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed 280 research articles following a structured iterative procedure inspired by the method for taxonomy development from Nickerson et al. (2013). Using deductive and inductive reasoning processes embedded in concurrent as well as joint research activities, the authors created a taxonomy of patterns as well as a classification of 89 research works.

Findings

In general, the findings extend the current understanding of BPM patterns. The authors identify pattern categories that are highly populated with research works as well as categories that have received far less attention such as risk and security, the ecological perspective and process architecture. Further, the analysis shows that there is not yet an overarching pattern language for business process model patterns. The insights can be used as starting point for developing such a pattern language.

Originality/value

Up to now, no comprehensive pattern taxonomy and research classification exists. The taxonomy and classification are useful for searching pattern works which is also supported by an accompanying website complementing the work. In regard to future research and publications on patterns, the authors derive recommendations regarding the content and structure of pattern publications.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Kongkiti Phusavat, Suphattra Ketsarapong, Jayanthi Ranjan and Binshan Lin

This paper aims to improve the Commission of Higher Education (CHE)'s current university classification and develop the Thai Higher Education Classification Model…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve the Commission of Higher Education (CHE)'s current university classification and develop the Thai Higher Education Classification Model (THEC‐model). This study supports the CHE's initiative to ensure that the future is more science‐oriented by encouraging universities to become National Research Universities (NRUs).

Design/methodology/approach

The research applies empirical data and a statistical approach for the THEC‐model's development. The model's results are then compared with the decisions reached earlier by the CHE in selecting public universities as research‐intensive.

Findings

The proposed classification criteria for NRUs consist of: research funding; the variety of instructional programmes; the level of instructional programmes; instructors and research staff body; and student body, which have significantly statistically influenced the differences in Y‐variables: research output, citation, and research awards at alpha 0.05. The initial results show that eight universities are selected. The findings are consistent with the 2008 announcement, except for two universities.

Practical implications

The developed THEC‐model benefits academic researchers, university administrators, and policymakers for many reasons. For example, the THEC‐model provides information for academic researchers to determine the important variables for a research university. The model provides information for policymakers to manage higher education effectively to raise the targets for a university.

Originality/value

The THEC‐model criteria were generated by reviewing the classification system in different locations. Such criteria could be applied extensively at domestic and international level. Moreover, the developed THEC‐model is based on a statistical approach and empirical data improved the reliability and would be beneficial to the CHEs in Thailand for further improvement on research‐focused HEI classification criteria in the future.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The group has continued to meet regularly since the publication of the last bulletin and has welcomed a number of new members and visitors from both home and overseas…

Abstract

The group has continued to meet regularly since the publication of the last bulletin and has welcomed a number of new members and visitors from both home and overseas. Many members who joined at the beginning or very early on in the Group's history still attend regularly, but several long‐standing members have also left, or ceased active participation, in the period under review. Towards the end of 1972 Mr Wells relinquished the chairmanship of the Group, due to pressure of work, and his place was taken by Mr Mills. Another departure, and one that robbed the Group of one of its most active and forceful members, was that of Jason Farradane. He left the country in 1974, and the Group presented him with a book as a memento of many enjoyable and provocative discussions stimulated by his presence at the meetings which he unfailingly attended. It was with great pleasure that he was welcomed back to a meeting while he was visiting this country in January 1976.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Lawrence F. Cunningham, Clifford E. Young and James Gerlach

Few marketing studies look at service classifications for self‐service technologies (SSTs) and none directly compare consumer‐based perceptions of traditional services to…

Abstract

Purpose

Few marketing studies look at service classifications for self‐service technologies (SSTs) and none directly compare consumer‐based perceptions of traditional services to SSTs. To fill this gap, this study aims to examine how customers perceived traditional services and SSTs on service classifications criteria proposed by Lovelock, Bowen and Bell.

Design/methodology/approach

In two separate studies consumer ratings for each classification method on each service were obtained. Using multi‐dimensional scaling (MDS), 13 traditional services and 12 SSTs were separately mapped onto a perceptual space of service classifications.

Findings

The comparison of the two perceptual spaces reveals that consumers viewed the classifications of convenience, person/object, and delivery for SSTs differently than that for traditional services. The classifications of traditional services were represented by two dimensions of customization/standardization and person/object. In contrast, the classifications of SSTs were represented by two dimensions of customization/standardization and separability/inseparability. Thus the description of the underlying dimensions of services varied by traditional services or SSTs.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible that the results of the MDS were influenced by the use of preset classifications. Results may also be influenced by the authors' choice of MDS method. Further research is needed regarding the classification of SSTs and the use of these classifications for SST design.

Originality/value

This research extends previous consumer‐based classification research by including SSTs. The findings identified separate typologies for SSTs and traditional services. The typologies should be of interest to both researchers and managers who are interested in how SSTs are perceived by consumers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2017

Pooria Niknazar and Mario Bourgault

Projects have high stakes in how they are categorized. The final place of a project within a classification scheme depends on the inclusion or exclusion of certain…

Abstract

Purpose

Projects have high stakes in how they are categorized. The final place of a project within a classification scheme depends on the inclusion or exclusion of certain classification criteria. So far, many researchers and organizations have used a variety classification criteria to construct different project classification schemes. However, most of these classification criteria have been taken for granted and the process of selecting them to categorize projects still remains a black box. The purpose of this paper is to open the black box of classification process and explain how it is reflected in picking the classification criteria.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from cognitive psychology’s literature, the authors examine the main views of classification process to provide insight into the unknown or implicit reasons that one might have to pick particular attributes as project classification criteria.

Findings

The authors argue that classification occurs in the eye of the beholder; it is not only the project’s features per se but also the classifier’s “goals, ideal and preference” or “knowledge of causal relations” that are reflected in the classification criteria.

Research limitations/implications

By elaborating the classification process, the authors brought the project context into the big picture of classification and provide a more rational, and coherent picture of how project classification works. This contributes to a theoretical blind spot, raised by prior researchers, related to the selection of project classification criteria.

Practical implications

Understanding classification processes will reduce the ambiguities, inconsistencies and multiple interpretations of project categories and help practitioners increase their projects’ visibility and legitimacy within an already established classification scheme. These implications help organizations in addressing some of the main obstacles to using categorization in project management practice.

Originality/value

The review of prior work in the category research literature and the insights from this paper will provide project management scholars with a useful toolbox for future research on project classification, which has long been understudied.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

IThe activity of the group has continued to progress with great energy and enthusiasm for practical applications of the theoretical ideas and schemes of the members, many…

Abstract

IThe activity of the group has continued to progress with great energy and enthusiasm for practical applications of the theoretical ideas and schemes of the members, many of whom have acted as consultants to private, government and international institutions. Some of the longer‐serving members retired, but continued to attend meetings. The Group heard with great regret of the death of Mr B. I. Palmer, its Founder Chairman. An important element in the discussions from its beginning was the theoretical scheme of S. R. Ranganathan, and this was largely due to Palmer, who had returned from war service in India fired with enthusiasm for Ranganathan's ideas, and determined to interest others in developing and applying them. His collaboration with Mr A. J. Wells, another founder member, had as an early result their little monograph, The fundamentals of library classification, which has greatly influenced both teaching and practice of classification, and not only in Britain.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Birger Hjørland

What kind of knowledge is needed by information specialists working in a specific subject field like medicine, sociology or music? What approaches have been used in…

Abstract

What kind of knowledge is needed by information specialists working in a specific subject field like medicine, sociology or music? What approaches have been used in information science to produce kinds of domain‐specific knowledge? This article presents 11 approaches to domain analysis. Together these approaches make a unique competence for information specialists. The approaches are: producing literature guides and subject gateways; producing special classifications and thesauri; research on indexing and retrieving specialities; empirical user studies; bibliometrical studies; historical studies; document and genre studies; epistemological and critical studies; terminological studies, LSP (languages for special purposes), discourse studies; studies of structures and institutions in scientific communication; and domain analysis in professional cognition and artificial intelligence. Specific examples and selective reviews of literature are provided, and the strengths and drawbacks of each of these approaches are discussed.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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