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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2021

Anne-Marie Gingras

Purpose: This chapter examines how two basic rights, freedom of expression, and the right to equality based on one’s dignity, reputation, and honor, were balanced in a…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter examines how two basic rights, freedom of expression, and the right to equality based on one’s dignity, reputation, and honor, were balanced in a case involving a stand-up comedian and an adolescent suffering from Treacher Collins syndrome. Methodology/Approach: The case is contrasted with Jürgen Habermas’ concept of the public sphere and with the intrinsic and utilitarian values that Canadian courts have attributed to free speech. Findings: Because the case was dealt with first in a human rights tribunal and then by a court of appeal, a number of considerations were overlooked in court proceedings: how laughter occurs; the broadening of Ward’s audience and its consequences; and Ward’s publicity strategy. These aspects are explored here to give a more complete picture of the case beyond the court decisions. Originality/Value: In Canada, freedom of expression is usually dealt with ordinary courts. A whole new avenue for dealing with this right is human rights bodies and tribunals. Contesting free speech in the name of defamation is being replaced by rights entrenched in human rights charters, such as the right to equality based on the preservation of one’s dignity, reputation, and honor.

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Media and Law: Between Free Speech and Censorship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-729-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2014

Julie Alev Dilmaç

To study the concept of honor in Turkish everyday life discourses. Many surveys have focused on namus, thus referring to honor killings, the mechanism of violence…

Abstract

Purpose

To study the concept of honor in Turkish everyday life discourses. Many surveys have focused on namus, thus referring to honor killings, the mechanism of violence perpetrated against women. The reason given for such killings, often seen as barbaric and the result of criminal urges, is that some men feel compelled to restore what they see as family honor, soiled by the actions of their female relatives. However, these studies avoid another key aspect of honor: namely the plurality of its meanings as honor in Turkey may also be translated both as şeref and onur.

Design/methodology/approach

To begin to understand honor in all its forms, I conducted interviews with 100 Turkish men and women ages 20–27, all university students or graduates, from the Istanbul area. I also consulted the current official and Ottoman dictionaries to understand the history of word use.

Findings

Among the young adults interviewed “honor-virtue” (i.e., namus) is a debated topic. It may be analyzed at both theoretical and geographic levels and has the connotations of otherness and non-modernity. Namus co-exists with şeref (citizen honor) and onur (dignity).

Social implications

Redefining the terms of honor could temper tensions between local/global, urban/countryside, modern/traditional, woman/man, and invisible frontier between namus and şeref worldviews. Advocating şeref and focusing on a broader definition of namus may encourage individuals to find their places in society. By focusing on national moral values, any individual in the country may participate in keeping the social order regardless of gender, age, or geographic location.

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Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-893-8

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Book part
Publication date: 31 January 2014

Åsa Ekvall

This study will look at the relationship between norms on gender equality on the one hand and the level of gender equality in the political and socioeconomic sphere, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study will look at the relationship between norms on gender equality on the one hand and the level of gender equality in the political and socioeconomic sphere, the presence or absence of armed conflict, and general peacefulness on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on gender equality norms from the World Values Surveys, political and socioeconomic gender equality from the Global Gender Gap Index, armed conflict from the Uppsala Conflict Data Base, and general peacefulness from the Global Peace Index are analyzed in a bivariate correlation.

Findings

The results show a significant association between norms on and attitudes toward gender equality and levels of political and socioeconomic gender equality, absence or presence of armed conflict, and level of general peacefulness.

Research limitations

There is no data base on norms on and attitudes toward the use of violence which is why only levels of violence are included in the study.

Social implications

The study shows that governments, aid agencies, NGOs and others working on conflict prevention and peace building need to focus on improving gender equality in order to achieve a sustainable decrease in conflict levels and an improvement in general levels of peacefulness.

Originality/value

This study is original in that it looks at norms on gender equality on the individual level on the one hand and actual levels of both gender equality and violence in the society, including armed conflict on the other.

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Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Yusuf Sidani

Abstract

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A Spring Aborted
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-666-8

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Lis Bates

The purpose of this paper is to address an emerging international debate about the involvement of females in perpetrating honour-based abuse (HBA). Presenting new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address an emerging international debate about the involvement of females in perpetrating honour-based abuse (HBA). Presenting new empirical data, this study profiles the different roles played by women, discussing them in relation to gender and their relationships to victims, and argues that acknowledgement of female perpetrators does not fundamentally challenge a gendered interpretation of HBA.

Design/methodology/approach

Some 1,474 case files flagged as HBA were gathered from one police force in Southern England and 50 domestic abuse agencies across England and Wales. Descriptive statistics explored which victim, perpetrator and abuse characteristics were associated with female perpetration. Case narratives were thematically analysed to profile the different roles females played. Findings were explored in eight key informant interviews with caseworkers from the services data came from.

Findings

This paper finds that: females are more involved in perpetrating HBA than other forms of domestic abuse, but primary perpetrators are still mostly male; victims are overwhelmingly female; the context for abuse is the maintenance of patriarchal values on gender roles; female perpetrator roles vary, meriting further exploration; and female perpetrators can be conceptualised within a gendered framework.

Originality/value

This paper presents important new empirical data to advance the debate on the role of women in perpetrating HBA. It will be of interest to academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners alike.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Rana Sobh and Russell Belk

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of an ethnographic study of homes in the Arab Gulf country of Qatar. The authors' analysis and contribution focuses on…

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1019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of an ethnographic study of homes in the Arab Gulf country of Qatar. The authors' analysis and contribution focuses on resolving the tension between privacy and hospitality in Qatari homes in the context of identity threats posed by an influx of Western modernity and its implications to marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves observation and in‐depth interviews with 24 middle‐class male and female home‐owning Qataris living in Doha. The analysis followed the logic of hermeneutic research.

Findings

It was found that values of privacy and hospitality are notably emphasized in Qatari homes. The authors discuss how these values coexist despite their glaring contradiction and also show that in this context privacy is used to reveal consumption and display status rather than to hide it away from the public arena.

Practical implications

With Qatar's collectivist orientation and strong gendered protectionism, marketing and advertising in the Gulf needs to be sensitive to these cultural practices.

Originality/value

By developing an understanding of the privacy/hospitality dialectic in Qatar, the paper provides insights into how these values are incorporated or resisted in the design and use of family homes in a modern era of increasing globalism and suggests implications for marketers.

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Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Michael Seadle

In copyright law, the principle of moral rights is that some part of the creator’s personality has gone into each original work, and that that element of personality…

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1458

Abstract

In copyright law, the principle of moral rights is that some part of the creator’s personality has gone into each original work, and that that element of personality cannot be sold or transferred. Moral rights are not about money, which is readily divisible, but about concepts like reputation and integrity, which are not. This column offers three examples of international collaborations where moral rights expectations could clash. At present the best remedy for moral rights disputes in the neworked environment is for all parties to understand the potential for diverging expectations.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

John Fraedrich, Othman Althawadi and Ramin Bagherzadeh

The continued rise of the multinational and debate as to what constitutes global business values is predicated on the UN Declaration and Global Business Compact. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The continued rise of the multinational and debate as to what constitutes global business values is predicated on the UN Declaration and Global Business Compact. This research suggests both documents explicitly exclude the existence of a foundational ethereal power creating morals thereby nullifying two thirds of the general population’s belief system. The authors argue against humanism as a global value beginning and suggest theism as a better origin and use the scientific method to introduce mathematical axioms supporting theism and complimenting humanism. Ontologically, the theist becomes a stronger base for the scientific inquiry into morals, values and business ethics. A comparison of major religious morals revealed eight factors: assurance; candor, fairness and honesty; character, integrity, truthfulness and exacting in truth; charity and compassion; environment; perseverance and tolerance; sacrifice; and seriousness. The research suggests that the UN documents do not adequately reflect these morals suggesting a change for businesses especially in Islamic regions.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of religious materials emphasizing morals rather than customs, eternal entity description or negative behaviors yielded 1,243 morals and associated synonyms via six religions (Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism) representing 4.5 billion people. All positive morals were cross-referenced and only common items across all six religions were included. With the 29 common morals, the authors completed a word meaning search and did a second comparison that yielded 8 moral factors or constructs.

Findings

Eight moral factors were found to be common in all major religions (assurance, fairness/honesty, character/integrity, charity/compassion, environment, tolerance, sacrifice and seriousness). By using the scientific method (Axioms), the authors argue that theism is a better beginning to researching morals and values within business and marketing.

Social implications

Multinationals should be made aware of the disconnect between the underlying problems of the Global Business Compacts’ values and the global morals identified. The results suggest adopting a codification system based on the pertinent morals as related to economic theories: capitalism, socialism and theism. The use of theism as a base to business and marketing ethics includes billions of customers and employees and their belief systems that should increase the validity and reliability of actions associated with corporate social responsibility, the environment and best practices.

Originality/value

The UN Declaration and subsequent Global Business Compact are argued to be flawed by its exclusion of religious morals and the historical period in which it was created. By using the scientific method and creating two axioms, the base to all business and marketing ethics must shift to the common moral factors identified.

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Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Aliya Kintonova, Alexander Vasyaev and Viktor Shestak

This paper aims to consider modern internet phenomena such as cyberbullying and cybermobbing. The emphasis in the paper is placed on the problematic issues of the legal…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider modern internet phenomena such as cyberbullying and cybermobbing. The emphasis in the paper is placed on the problematic issues of the legal practice of combating cyberbullying and cyber-mobbing in developing countries as these phenomena are still insufficiently studied. The subject of this paper is modern internet phenomena such as cyberbullying and cyber-mobbing. The emphasis in the paper is placed on the problematic issues of the legal practice of combating cyberbullying and cyber-mobbing in developing countries as these phenomena are still insufficiently studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The legislation of developing countries is compared with doctrinal and practical developments in the fight against the studied problem in developed countries of the West, as well as countries of the former USSR. Moreover, experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of methods to combat cyberbullying using social networks. Thus, 40 random accounts of people (presumably from 18 to 30 years old) were analyzed.

Findings

This paper indicates the concepts of cyber-mobbing and cyberbullying, as well as their varieties that exist in the modern world. This study examines statistical data, programs and measures of different states in the fight against cyberbullying and cyber-mobbing. Results of experiments showed that Instagram users are aware of the availability of built-in extensions of the social network to protect against cyberbullying and use them relatively frequently. With that, female segment of Instagram users is more concerned about the content of the comments under their photos than the male one.

Originality/value

Measures have been developed to prevent and counteract cyberbullying and cyber-mobbing, the introduction of which into the policies of states might help in the fight against these social phenomena.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Tamara Eisenschitz

To explore moral rights laws in Europe and their effects on publication contents.

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1260

Abstract

Purpose

To explore moral rights laws in Europe and their effects on publication contents.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis of legislation, cases and information resources which illustrate effects of law.

Findings

There are three main types of moral right. They effect: authorship and reputation concerning correction of errors and history of ideas; elucidation of ideas through parody: is a reputation being unduly attacked?; the creative extension of cultural content by its readership/audience: when is this legitimate?

Practical implications

These features link the property concept of knowledge with a human‐rights construct of content defined via personality.

Originality/value

Choices of regulation affect the balance between property and personality approaches which determine access to knowledge and culture. The IS community needs awareness of its choices.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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