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Article

Neeraj Mittal, Renu Agarwal and Willem Selen

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the development of key supply chain capabilities in the Indian public sector-run liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the development of key supply chain capabilities in the Indian public sector-run liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) supply chain. This case study has relevance to emerging markets grappling with problems caused by monopolies and subsidies. Furthermore, this case study not only aims to improve operations of the LPG supply chain, but also re-designs its supply network to meet customers’ expectations. It illustrates value creation through growth in non-domestic sales, a reduction in consumption of subsidized LPG as a consequence of better understanding of customer needs and customer diversity, process re-engineering and deployment of ICT systems, and change management and capability building across various LPG stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive research methodology is applied, using an illustrative single case study of the Indian public sector-run LPG supply chain. The research methodology is iterative and exploratory in nature, consisting of a back and forth process between extant literature and the field, as well as in-depth discussions/interviews with senior management, distributors, and consumers.

Findings

Key supply chain capabilities of an integrated and seamless ICT system, detection and blocking of duplicate/ghost connections, the capping of entitlements, and coordination and collaboration across various stakeholders result in value creation for all stakeholders. When such collaboration across stakeholders’ spans both vertically and horizontally through the supply chain, change management and capability building drive value creation through policy interventions and initiatives.

Practical implications

This study provides an illustrative example of meeting customers’ expectations, increasing consumer convenience, and improving service levels, amidst the complex subsidy challenges in LPG distribution in India. The economic and environmental benefits, as well as increased customer satisfaction, from policy interventions regarding value creation in supply chains, have implications for similar public sector-run schemes.

Social implications

As a result of the various policy changes, the LPG subsidy was restricted to legitimate customers, reducing the fiscal burden on the Indian Government. Furthermore, seamless ICT-introduced efficiencies for government, distributers, and customers were attained.

Originality/value

This research articulates the capture, creation, and appropriation of value through the deployment of new supply chain initiatives in a large, complex environment, in particular the public sector-run LPG supply chain.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article

Mile Katic, Dilek Cetindamar and Renu Agarwal

Whilst capabilities in exploiting existing assets and simultaneously exploring new opportunities have proven essential in today's organisations, an understanding of how…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst capabilities in exploiting existing assets and simultaneously exploring new opportunities have proven essential in today's organisations, an understanding of how these so-called ambidextrous capabilities are deployed remains elusive. Thus, the authors aim to investigate the role of better management practices (BMP), as organisational routines, in deploying ambidextrous capabilities in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

High-variety, low-volume (HVLV) manufacturers are adopted as exemplar ambidextrous organisations. A conceptual model was developed where BMP, including human resource management (HRM) and production planning and control (PPC), are considered as mediators in the relationship between ambidextrous capabilities and organisational performance outcomes. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was adopted to analyse the results of a survey undertaken by Australian HVLV manufacturers.

Findings

The results suggest that merely holding ambidextrous capabilities is not enough – demonstrating a fully mediating role of BMP between ambidextrous capabilities and HVLV manufacturer performance outcomes. However, the individual effects of PPC and HRM prove varied in their unique impact on HVLV manufacturer performance.

Practical implications

This study also provides a rare account of how HVLV manufacturers can leverage their inherently ambidextrous design towards greater organisational performance and highlights critical considerations in the selection of organisational capabilities.

Originality/value

By exemplifying the explanatory power of BMP in ambidextrous capability deployment, this study moves beyond the more prevalent stance on the links between BMP and ambidextrous capabilities as that of capability building through management practices, to one concerning the deployment of the capability itself.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article

Moira Scerri and Renu Agarwal

The purpose of this paper is to measure service productivity using the Service Enterprise Productivity in Action (SEPIA) model. The research operationalises only one of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure service productivity using the Service Enterprise Productivity in Action (SEPIA) model. The research operationalises only one of the five stakeholder groups, the customer interface which incorporates service complexity (SC), customer interactions, customer channel, customer loyalty (CL) (new) as inputs, and CL (referred and repeat) and willingness to pay as output measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The research extends our understanding of existing service productivity models with the development of the SEPIA model. Data were collected from 14 organisations operating in the Australian travel and tourism industry, which was analysed using a data envelopment analysis input oriented variable return to scale method as applied to the SEPIA model customer interface.

Findings

Four key findings from the research include: customer choice and their ability to pay is a determinant of service productivity; service productivity is a two stage process when measured; SC is not categorical; and quality business systems do impact service productivity.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this research is that only one (customer) of the five key stakeholders, customer, employee, manager, supplier and shareholder, was operationalised in this research paper.

Practical implications

The operationalisation of the SEPIA customer interface using transactional data and measuring non-financial, intangible factors of productivity provide managers with insights on what services to offer, when to invest in or promote the use of technology and whether to spend marketing effort on customer acquisition or customer retention.

Originality/value

The SEPIA model positions service firms within a social and service value network and provides a range of customer measures that extend the current capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and service (S), KLEMS measure of productivity and can be used to show the impact customers have on service productivity.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article

Md Maruf Hossan Chowdhury, Mohammed Quaddus and Renu Agarwal

Following a contingent resource-based view (CRBV) perspective, this paper aims to explore the operating context in which supply chain resilience (SCRE) is likely to…

Abstract

Purpose

Following a contingent resource-based view (CRBV) perspective, this paper aims to explore the operating context in which supply chain resilience (SCRE) is likely to enhance the supply chain performance (SCP) of organizations. More specifically, the authors developed the ‘Supply Chain Resilience’ model wherein we considered two important exogenous context variables (supply chain relational practices [SCRPs] and network complexities [NCs]) and studied their moderating roles on the relationship between SCRE and SCP. The authors also investigated the conditional effect of SCRE on SCP at different levels of SCRPs and NCs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both qualitative and quantitative approaches. For the qualitative approach, a field study was undertaken, while the quantitative study was conducted via the use of a survey questionnaire of 274 apparel manufacturers and their suppliers in Bangladesh. The authors applied Hayes PROCESS enabled multiple regression analysis and structural equation modelling to statistically test the proposed research models.

Findings

The research findings revealed that SCRP and NC individually moderated the link between SCRE and SCP. The link between SCRE and SCP was strengthened via the interaction effect of SCRP and NC, even if the NC value was high.

Practical implications

The findings will assist supply chain managers in managing supply chain performance during uncertainties by strengthening resilience capability at different levels of NCs and SCRPs.

Originality/value

Drawing on CRBV, the authors studied how the conditional effects of exogenous variables (SCRP and NC) moderated the relationship between SCRE and SCP in both two- and three-way interactions, which is a novel approach in the SCRE literature and also extends the theoretical perspective of CRBV.

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Article

Renu Agarwal, Roy Green, Neeru Agarwal and Krithika Randhawa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of best management practices in an Australian state-run healthcare system, namely New South Wales (NSW), and studies the impact of a range of hospital factors in driving best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adapts a unique survey instrument globally tested to quantify the multi-dimensional nature of hospital management practices in 42 acute care public hospitals of NSW. The authors then analysed the role of hospital-specific characteristics in driving best management practices, namely hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds, employees and doctors), level of skill and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy.

Findings

The findings of this study show the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in NSW hospitals. The authors find a positive association between the adoption of better management practices and hospital size (measured by the number of hospital beds and employees), level of skills and education, degree of hospital manager autonomy and organisational hierarchy. However, hospital size as measured by the number of doctors did not have a statistically significant relationship.

Practical implications

This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators, clinical doctors and healthcare policy-makers who want to improve and develop strategies for better management in the healthcare sector.

Originality/value

This study provides an internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in public hospitals, and contributes to the evidence-base of management practices and performance in hospitals.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Renu Agarwal and Willem Selen

Innovation in services is thought to be multi‐dimensional in nature, and in this context the purpose of this paper is to present and operationalise the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation in services is thought to be multi‐dimensional in nature, and in this context the purpose of this paper is to present and operationalise the concept of “elevated service offerings” (ESO) in collaborating service organisations. ESO stands for new or enhanced service offerings which can only be eventuated as a result of partnering, and which could not be delivered on individual organisational merit. ESO helps us expand our understanding of service innovation to include a service network or service system's dimension.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation model is specified and estimated based on constructs and relationships grounded in the literature, as well as self‐developed constructs, using empirical data from 449 respondents in an Australian telecommunications service provider (SP) and its partnering organisations.

Findings

Results show that ESO is a multi‐dimensional construct which was operationalised and validated through an extensive literature review, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modelling using a holdout sample.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative and empirical data analysis was undertaken with data collected from a single large telecommunications SP organisation, and its partnering organisations. Future research may seek to collect data from the entire telecommunications industry sector and their partnering organisations, across other service sectors, or even any other organisation where collaboration is pivotal to their success.

Practical implications

Service organisations today need to understand that innovation in services is not just about process or product innovation, or even performance and productivity improvements, but in fact includes organisational forms of innovation. Indeed, the interactions and complementarities between the three different aspects of ESO – strategic, productivity, and performance – highlight the increasing complex and multi‐dimensional character of innovation and the ongoing iterative process.

Originality/value

This research provides empirical evidence for the existence of a multi‐dimensional innovation in services construct – known as elevated service offerings in a collaborative service network, along with an adapted definition of service and a service innovation model.

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Article

Renu Agarwal, Roy Green, Neeru Agarwal and Krithika Randhawa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality of management practices of public hospitals in the Australian healthcare system, specifically those in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality of management practices of public hospitals in the Australian healthcare system, specifically those in the state-managed health systems of Queensland and New South Wales (NSW). Further, the authors assess the management practices of Queensland and NSW public hospitals jointly and globally benchmark against those in the health systems of seven other countries, namely, USA, UK, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors adapt the unique and globally deployed Bloom et al. (2009) survey instrument that uses a “double blind, double scored” methodology and an interview-based scoring grid to measure and internationally benchmark the management practices in Queensland and NSW public hospitals based on 21 management dimensions across four broad areas of management – operations, performance monitoring, targets and people management.

Findings

The findings reveal the areas of strength and potential areas of improvement in the Queensland and NSW Health hospital management practices when compared with public hospitals in seven countries, namely, USA, UK, Sweden, France, Germany, Italy and Canada. Together, Queensland and NSW Health hospitals perform best in operations management followed by performance monitoring. While target management presents scope for improvement, people management is the sphere where these Australian hospitals lag the most.

Practical implications

This paper is of interest to both hospital administrators and health care policy-makers aiming to lift management quality at the hospital level as well as at the institutional level, as a vehicle to consistently deliver sustainable high-quality health services.

Originality/value

This study provides the first internationally comparable robust measure of management capability in Australian public hospitals, where hospitals are run independently by the state-run healthcare systems. Additionally, this research study contributes to the empirical evidence base on the quality of management practices in the Australian public healthcare systems of Queensland and NSW.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Richard Hall, Renu Agarwal and Roy Green

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a survey of the external and internal forces changing the nature of business schools and business education. It aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to undertake a survey of the external and internal forces changing the nature of business schools and business education. It aims to investigate how management education responds to increasing productivity, innovation and capability challenges, examine how MBA programs currently meet these demands, and how these courses might redefine their identity and delivery and finally explore how to deepen engagement between business schools and business stakeholders, and to balance the imperatives of relevance and quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a survey of business schools and business education in the context of evolving educational and industry policy in Australia in response to an increasingly international and competitive economy. The different potential roles and strategies of business schools are examined, and future strategies identified.

Findings

The paper finds that management education is facing insistent pressure to change internationally, and that business schools need to become more dynamic, innovative and responsive to succeed.

Research limitations/implications

This survey considers the implications of recent policy on business education and relates this to emerging practice. Further research is required on how innovative pedagogical approaches will deliver more integrated and relevant business education.

Practical implications

The paper defines key business school strategies, and outlines significant new approaches to making business education more innovative, responsive, integrated and engaged.

Social implications

The paper considers means to more active stakeholder engagement for business schools.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the weaknesses of traditional business education strategy, and reveals the potential for significant change.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Aakanksha Kataria, Pooja Garg and Renu Rastogi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between high-performance HR practices (HPHRPs), psychological climate (PC), work engagement (WE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between high-performance HR practices (HPHRPs), psychological climate (PC), work engagement (WE) and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) among IT professionals. This study further intends to provide a framework to understand and predict factors affecting organizational citizenship performance in the Indian IT sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a sample of 464 IT employees working in 29 information-intensive global organizations, and the statistical method employed is structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the present study demonstrated the significance of employees’ perceptions of PC through which HPHRPs can boost employees’ WE, which, in turn, has come out to be the principal mechanism through which HPHRPs and PC have impact on OCBs.

Research limitations/implications

The results have established a platform where HR managers can be motivated to open up new avenues to employees where they can be psychologically involved in work roles and feel highly motivated to bring their good spirits at the workplace in order to benefit the organization at large.

Originality/value

This research explores the changing dynamics of Indian business scenario in the IT context. IT professionals may perceive and react differently to the HR system in the organization and have higher expectations of congenial working conditions that enhance their capability to employ personal skills and resources in the realization of organizational goals. Thus, the study tries to tap their experiences and perceptions and map their performances in the organization.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article

Suman Mittal, Krishan K. Garg and Renu Aggarwal

The Indian banking industry has undergone many changes with the advent of changing economic environment in the country. Many changes have taken place in terms of customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian banking industry has undergone many changes with the advent of changing economic environment in the country. Many changes have taken place in terms of customer services, work culture, infrastructure, approach to sales and customer relationship management amongst others. This paper aims to attempt to evaluate the adherence of BCSBI code by the banks. Customer perception has been evaluated to analyse the adherence of the code. Also, the authors have tried to evaluate the impact of customer type (mass and class customers) and bank type (based on bank ownership- private and public banks) on the compliance of the code by the bankers or minimum regulatory requirements with respect to customer services. Questionnaire has been developed as per the Banking Code and Standard Board of India (a customer services cell of Reserve Bank of India), and BCSBI has been used as a regulatory standard to compare the level of compliance by the banks.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data have been collected from private and public sector banks. In the first step, instrument validity and reliability has been checked by using structural equation modelling; in the second step, descriptive statistics has been used to know the extent of fulfillment of standard by banks; and in the third step, a two-way multivariate analysis of variances has been used to do the comparative analyses of the respondents data.

Findings

The overall finding of the research shows that overall adherence of the dimension of code are not in sync with the objective of the code. Study also has shown the mindset of the Indian bankers that how they predominantly serve the class customers and push those products to the customers which are target based or earn profitability for the banks and incentives for the banker. Private banks are ahead in compliance with respect to the customer services, but they are also ahead in sales malpractices.

Practical implications

This study is an eye opener for the regulators, as per BCSBI regulations, surprise supervision take place every year, but this study shows the ineffectiveness of that supervision. Following the BCSBI norms by the banks is just eyewash of regulators, but all the norms are fulfilled only in papers but not in actual practice.

Originality/value

The research paper is original piece of work; the researcher did not find any study related to BCSBI code in Indian as well as in international literature.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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