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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Paule Poulin, Lea Austen, Catherine M. Scott, Cameron D. Waddell, Elijah Dixon, Michelle Poulin and René Lafrenière

When introducing new health technologies, decision makers must integrate research evidence with local operational management information to guide decisions about whether…

Abstract

Purpose

When introducing new health technologies, decision makers must integrate research evidence with local operational management information to guide decisions about whether and under what conditions the technology will be used. Multi‐criteria decision analysis can support the adoption or prioritization of health interventions by using criteria to explicitly articulate the health organization's needs, limitations, and values in addition to evaluating evidence for safety and effectiveness. This paper seeks to describe the development of a framework to create agreed‐upon criteria and decision tools to enhance a pre‐existing local health technology assessment (HTA) decision support program.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compiled a list of published criteria from the literature, consulted with experts to refine the criteria list, and used a modified Delphi process with a group of key stakeholders to review, modify, and validate each criterion. In a workshop setting, the criteria were used to create decision tools.

Findings

A set of user‐validated criteria for new health technology evaluation and adoption was developed and integrated into the local HTA decision support program. Technology evaluation and decision guideline tools were created using these criteria to ensure that the decision process is systematic, consistent, and transparent.

Practical implications

This framework can be used by others to develop decision‐making criteria and tools to enhance similar technology adoption programs.

Originality/value

The development of clear, user‐validated criteria for evaluating new technologies adds a critical element to improve decision‐making on technology adoption, and the decision tools ensure consistency, transparency, and real‐world relevance.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Neal M. Ashkanasy, Ashlea C. Troth, Sandra A. Lawrence and Peter J. Jordan

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM…

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM literature has lagged in addressing the emotional dimensions of life at work. In this chapter therefore, beginning with a multi-level perspective taken from the OB literature, we introduce the roles played by emotions and emotional regulation in the workplace and discuss their implications for HRM. We do so by considering five levels of analysis: (1) within-person temporal variations, (2) between persons (individual differences), (3) interpersonal processes; (4) groups and teams, and (5) the organization as a whole. We focus especially on processes of emotional regulation in both self and others, including discussion of emotional labor and emotional intelligence. In the opening sections of the chapter, we discuss the nature of emotions and emotional regulation from an OB perspective by introducing the five-level model, and explaining in particular how emotions and emotional regulation play a role at each of the levels. We then apply these ideas to four major domains of concern to HR managers: (1) recruitment, selection, and socialization; (2) performance management; (3) training and development; and (4) compensation and benefits. In concluding, we stress the interconnectedness of emotions and emotional regulation across the five levels of the model, arguing that emotions and emotional regulation at each level can influence effects at other levels, ultimately culminating in the organization’s affective climate.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Akuraun Shadrach Iyortsuun, Mwuese Theresa Nmadu, Reuel Dakung and Monica C. Gajere

This paper aims to attempt to synthesize the evidence in literature on the link between passion and passion outcomes to propose a parsimonious framework of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to attempt to synthesize the evidence in literature on the link between passion and passion outcomes to propose a parsimonious framework of entrepreneurial passion and venture performance based on the theory of social cognition, identity and self-regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed review of empirical and conceptual articles related to the topic was the adopted methodology. An eclectic synthesis of the evidence guided the development of the framework as proposed.

Findings

Empirical review of the related studies reveals that the link between entrepreneurial passion and venture performance is distal. Based on the theoretical foundation of the study, entrepreneurial passion is proposed to have a direct link on venture performance and an indirect link mediated by goal-setting, entrepreneurial behavior and entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Control variables proposed include age, sex, size, work experience or tenure and self-regulation or feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Entrepreneurial passion is conceived as an experienced construct conceptualized as the interaction of intense positive feeling and identity centrality associated with venture outcomes defined as opportunity recognition, venture creation/growth and threshold performance.

Practical implications

The study provides a parsimonious framework of entrepreneurial passion and venture performance that includes goals, entrepreneurial behavior and self-efficacy as mediator variables and age, sex, size, work experience or tenure and self-regulation or feedback as control variables.

Originality/value

The framework extends the ontological field of entrepreneurial passion, which can be validated by empirical research.

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