Search results

1 – 10 of 13
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jan Rotmans, René Kemp and Marjolein van Asselt

Transitions are transformation processes in which society changes in a fundamental way over a generation or more. Although the goals of a transition are ultimately chosen…

Abstract

Transitions are transformation processes in which society changes in a fundamental way over a generation or more. Although the goals of a transition are ultimately chosen by society, governments can play a role in bringing about structural change in a stepwise manner. Their management involves sensitivity to existing dynamics and regular adjustment of goals to overcome the conflict between long‐term ambition and short‐term concerns. This article uses the example of a transition to a low emission energy supply in the Netherlands to argue that transition management provides a basis for coherence and consistency in public policy and can be the spur to sustainable development.

Details

Foresight, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Raj Aggarwal

This paper contends that, contrary to conventional wisdom, it may be rational to manage translation exposure. Accounting procedures for the translation of foreign currency…

Abstract

This paper contends that, contrary to conventional wisdom, it may be rational to manage translation exposure. Accounting procedures for the translation of foreign currency accounts influence the reported income of a multi‐national firm. With non‐zero agency costs, reported income impacts real costs. In such cases, therefore, it may be rational to hedge translation exposure. Empirical evidence of agency costs and the managerial tendency to report higher levels of translated income, based on the early adoption of Financial Accounting Standard No. 52, is presented.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Louise Livingstone

The paper aims to rediscover the subtle heart and discuss its importance in relation to conversations regarding sustainability.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to rediscover the subtle heart and discuss its importance in relation to conversations regarding sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the imaginal approach of the author’s doctoral research, this paper is informed by the discourse of transpersonal psychology, attempting to open a space through which it becomes possible to perceive the heart differently.

Findings

This paper discusses the idea that knowledge as generated through the heart has been rendered subservient to knowledge generated through the mind/brain through a dominant/medical narrative (Bound Alberti, 2012). This means that the heart’s wisdom and the heart’s benevolent qualities cannot gain traction at the level at which decisions are made in society.

Research limitations/implications

While the heart is not unproblematic, and can carry notions of moral superiority, this paper is written as an appeal to create safe enough spaces to bring the heart back into conversation at the level of political discourse.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that it is the approach of the heart, the qualities and characteristics that the heart embodies, and the different way of being in the world that the heart makes possible, which could play an important role in guiding us towards a more sustainable world. When taken seriously, the heart offers a way of engaging with, and thinking about, ideas of relationship, wholeness and interconnection – all of which have been identified as important by numerous scholars in relation to engaging with global challenges (de Witt, 2016).

Social implications

This paper suggests that it is the approach of the heart and the different way of being in the world that the heart makes possible, which could play an important role in guiding humanity towards a more sustainable world.

Originality/value

Since the late 1900s, scholars have been calling for creative thinking in relation to engaging with the myriad of issues facing our planet, and this paper is written as a response to that call – creating a platform for the heart to speak and making a case for its importance in conversations relating to sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

Christine Roland‐Levy

Examines how French teenagers have reacted to the replacement of France’s national currency by the euro, comparing their attitudes six months before the change with those…

Abstract

Examines how French teenagers have reacted to the replacement of France’s national currency by the euro, comparing their attitudes six months before the change with those afterwards. Aims to show how a new social representation is built up from individual attitudes shared by many, referring to the work of Durkheim, Moscovici, and more recent theoretical approaches. Concludes that the introduction of the euro in France and simultaneously in 11 other member countries of the European Union has produced a much wider feeling of territoriality, a change in socialisation which appears as a European feeling of belonging.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 12 no. 4/5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Benjamin W. Redekop

The purpose of this paper is to deepen our understanding of the philosophical and scientific pedigree of the concept of “common sense”, and explore the implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen our understanding of the philosophical and scientific pedigree of the concept of “common sense”, and explore the implications for managerial decision‐makers.

Design/methodology/approach

After examining the management literature on this topic, a brief history of the notion and philosophy of common sense is followed by a review of recent findings in cognitive science and other fields and a discussion of implications for managerial decision‐making.

Findings

The notion of common sense has a stable perceptual basis in the makeup of the human mind, as has been shown by philosophers and scientists. Common sense intuitions serve as the basis for making sense of the world: visual perception, scientific reasoning, language, psychology, mathematics, and moral judgments are all rooted in “mental hardware” of common sense. While it is a necessary element of human cognition, common sense can nevertheless lead us astray if we are unaware of its contours and limitations, which are outlined in this paper.

Practical implications

Understanding that the mind comes equipped with a host of common sense mental instincts will have an impact on both one's own decision‐making processes, and how decision‐makers attempt to influence others.

Originality/value

Based on original research as well as literature from a variety of disciplines, this paper provides a comprehensive understanding of the philosophical and scientific pedigree of “common sense” and its implications for decision‐makers.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Gore supports IT Will the next Vice President of the United States push information technology to the forefront of America's domestic policy? It may well happen because Al…

Abstract

Gore supports IT Will the next Vice President of the United States push information technology to the forefront of America's domestic policy? It may well happen because Al Gore has played a leading role in the Senate as Chairman of the Sub‐committee on Science, Technology and Space and as a leading member of a group of Democratic Senators that believe investment in IT is one way out of the country's current economic doldrums.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Leslie Kane

“Since films attract an audience of millions, the need and appetite for information about them is enormous.” So said Harold Leonard in his introduction to The Film Index

Abstract

“Since films attract an audience of millions, the need and appetite for information about them is enormous.” So said Harold Leonard in his introduction to The Film Index published in 1941. The 1970's has produced more than enough — too much — food to satisfy that appetite. In the past five years the number of reference books, in this context defined as encyclopedias, handbooks, directories, dictionaries, indexes and bibliographies, and the astounding number of volumes on individual directors, complete histories, genre history and analysis, published screenplays, critics' anthologies, biographies of actors and actresses, film theory, film technique and production and nostalgia, that have been published is overwhelming. The problem in film scholarship is not too little material but the senseless duplication of materials that already exist and the embarrassing output of items that are poorly or haphazardly researched, or perhaps should not have been written at all.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

WE do not apologize for devoting space this month to the Scottish Government Report on Libraries. It is, as our writers affirm, an important document and many themes for…

Abstract

WE do not apologize for devoting space this month to the Scottish Government Report on Libraries. It is, as our writers affirm, an important document and many themes for debate may emerge from it. If a reading circle of young librarians were formed in any district it could consider this document page by page with much profit. It is, for an official document, interesting in style. It starts many old ideas, it has the verve and certainty which we look for in the amateur rather than the professional writer. To some of its statements, for example its assertion that “libraries have reached or are approaching a temporary limit to their usefulness, because the schools have not yet given adequate training in the use and power of books,” librarians may well ask “why?” in relation to the second part of this statement; and they certainly refuse to admit or believe the first part of it. In fact, the use of libraries in such universal manner is largely the result of the work of modern libraries for children. The librarian teaches children what to read. We have not reached any such limit as is affirmed ; we are indeed only on the margin of our possibilities.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Ad Straub, Marnix Koopman and Henk‐Jan van Mossel

This paper intends to ascertain a general guideline for performance measurement and management by social enterprises, combining public and private tasks.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper intends to ascertain a general guideline for performance measurement and management by social enterprises, combining public and private tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual systems approach is used as a framework. Maintenance service delivery by Dutch housing associations is used as a case study to show how the conceptual systems approach to performance measurement can be helpful to address the managerial problems of social enterprises, the actors involved and the possible consequences of new policies and interventions.

Findings

The system approach to performance measurement has the tools to bring transparency to the aims and means of the various participants in the production process of social enterprises having complex aims and tasks both in the market and in the public domain. The identification of key performance indicators, as well as the input, throughput, output and outcome indicators, ensures the effectiveness and efficiency of the internal business process and also covers the accountability to external stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual systems approach to performance measurement was tested by Dutch housing associations. Researchers are encouraged to test the conceptual systems approach to performance measurement in other social enterprises.

Practical implications

The complexity of the public housing sector and generally social enterprises needs transparent performance measurement. This complexity – due to dynamics in the surroundings – also causes measurement problems. When deciding on performance indicators it is essential to gain a clear idea of the manageable and unmanageable dynamics and to adjust the performance measurement system accordingly.

Originality/value

The importance of performance measurement by social enterprises is growing. The paper shows how the conceptual systems approach can still be very helpful to identify performance indicators combining tasks in the market and public domain.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13