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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Gregg Harry Rawlings, Christopher Gaskell, Keeley Rolling and Nigel Beail

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and interventions. The purpose of this paper is to explore the accessibility and prospective acceptability of providing telephone and videoconference-mediated psychological interventions in individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a service evaluation, a mixed-methods questionnaire was developed and completed by clients who had been referred for psychological therapy at an adult intellectual disabilities’ community health service in the north of England. All clients were assessed using the Red/Amber/Green (RAG) system by a consultant clinical psychologist for risk and potential suitability for indirect service delivery given their ability and needs.

Findings

Overall, 22 clients were invited to take part, of which, only seven (32%) were accepting of telephone or videoconference-mediated psychological therapy. Most of the clients were unable to engage in video-conference therapy and therefore, only suitable for phone therapy. This paper presents the remaining findings and discusses the clinical implications and unique considerations for intellectual disability services drawing on the existing literature.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that the authors are aware of, examining videoconference-mediated psychological therapy in this population. It is hoped the data will be used to help inform practice or policy when using such therapeutic approaches in adults with an intellectual disability.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 26 December 2019

Micaela Mercado and Virna Little

The adoption of telephone-delivered mental health services (TDMHS) for scaling collaborative care or addressing access to mental health services in routine primary care…

Abstract

Purpose

The adoption of telephone-delivered mental health services (TDMHS) for scaling collaborative care or addressing access to mental health services in routine primary care practice is gradual despite the needs of the population. Although there are multi-level factors associated with efficient implementation of collaborative care, there is limited understanding of clinicians’ perceptions, experiences and acceptability providing mental health treatment exclusively over the telephone. The purpose of this paper is to explore behavioral health clinicians’ delivery of mental health services over the telephone within primary care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study explored behavioral health professionals’ perceptions and experiences providing remote, TDMHS. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 11 clinicians in New York, California and Arizona who provided collaborative care services to patients exclusively over the telephone. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods.

Findings

Three main themes and associated subthemes emerged from the analyses. The first theme was participants’ perceptions of TDMHS prior to implementation relating to patient characteristics, patient engagement and comparison to in-person therapy. The second main theme identified was participants’ experiences implementing TDMHS with subthemes relating to benefits, quality of care, gaps in care and concerns implementing TDMHS. The final theme that emerged from the analysis was participants’ perceived acceptability of TDMHS by patients.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limits the generalizability of these findings.

Practical implications

Mental health services delivered over the telephone are perceived as feasible and acceptable by behavioral health clinicians.

Originality/value

This study contributes to gaps in research about behavioral health clinicians’ beliefs, uptake and acceptability toward mental health services delivered exclusively over the telephone.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Mehdi Hosseinzadeh, Omed Hassan Ahmed, Ali Ehsani, Aram Mahmood Ahmed, Hawkar Kamaran Hama and Bay Vo

Economists have recognized knowledge management as a promising tool regarding all aspects of the economy, including health care. The volume of biomedical literature is…

Abstract

Purpose

Economists have recognized knowledge management as a promising tool regarding all aspects of the economy, including health care. The volume of biomedical literature is currently growing at an exponential rate, and the vast number of studies makes it extremely difficult for researchers to keep up with new developments in their research areas. Therefore, the efficient management of huge amounts of data and the accuracy of the knowledge thus obtained are vital concerns. Electronic health (e-health) has emerged as a useful concept to provide data for solo self-care management. Although health care is a common topic on the internet, patients rarely share their health care-related knowledge on social media. This study aims to examine the impact of knowledge on e-health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper complies with the methodological requirements of systematic literature reviews. The present paper has investigated the newest systems and studied their practical techniques in detail. The effects of knowledge on e-health have been categorized into major groups.

Findings

The outcomes indicate that the capabilities of information and communication technology certainly promote the exchange of knowledge within clinics. The results also show that institutional architectures have significant impacts on knowledge-sharing exercises, significantly improving patient safety.

Practical implications

These findings will be essential in the understanding of the interplay among various signals in theory and in the understanding of patients’ choice in the e-health community in practice. The results have implications for existing health management and e-health literature. The present paper will help policymakers, health-care executives and project managers to effectively set their operations and make them maintainable, prevent unpredicted obstacles and better allocate their resources. Overall, the results of this paper will guide researchers who are working in the field of e-health.

Originality/value

E-health attempts have mostly focused on answering questions using context-specific technical answers, regardless of the key role of knowledge resources. The present paper has provided an innovative viewpoint on how knowledge resources and knowledge-sharing initiatives may have a role in the innovative work behaviors shown by health-care employees. As noted before, there have been only a few studies regarding the effects of knowledge on health care, so the present paper contributes to the previous literature, particularly about e-health.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Jean Mary Daly Lynn, Elaine Armstrong and Suzanne Martin

The purpose of this paper is to outline the application of user centred design (UCD) within a research project to support the design, development and evaluation of a brain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the application of user centred design (UCD) within a research project to support the design, development and evaluation of a brain computer interface (BCI) with associated home-based services and remote therapy station for people with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design/methodology/approach

A multi- stakeholder UCD approach was adopted to include people living with ABI, their caregivers and therapists providing rehabilitation. A three-phased iterative approach was implemented: Phase 1 was to gather user requirements, Phase 2 an iterative design phase with end user (EU) groups and therapists and finally the verification and implementation phase. The final phase had two strands of a home-based BCI evaluation with target EUs and their caregivers, alongside this, therapists evaluated the final therapist station that supports the use of the BCI at home. Ethical governance, inline with Ulster University, was awarded.

Findings

UCD enabled the co-creation and validation of a home-based BCI system for social inclusion and rehabilitation.

Originality/value

This was the first BCI project to adopt UCD to design and validation a novel home-based BCI system and migrate this from the lab to home. It highlights the importance of UCD to bridge the gap between the technical developers and those whom the technology is aimed at. This complex design process is essential to increase usability and reduce device abandonment.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Jackie Wales, Nicola Brewin, Karima Susi, Alison Eivors, Debbie Whight and Rheanne Leatherland

There is a dearth of research on what constitutes effective transfer of care from children’s and young people services to adult services for patients with eating disorders…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a dearth of research on what constitutes effective transfer of care from children’s and young people services to adult services for patients with eating disorders (EDs) in the UK. Transition has implications for continuity of care and particularly for early intervention which has the best prognosis. The purpose of this paper is to understand the experience of transition and identify facilitators and barriers to this.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methodology was used. Focus groups (n = 4) were held with clinicians (n = 22) working in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services or adult ED services. Individual interviews were conducted with patients (n = 5) who had commenced/completed transition to adult services and with parents/carers (n = 6) of patients invited for interview.

Findings

A number of factors may facilitate or impede transition and can be grouped into the broad themes of communication, managing the differences between services and timing of transition. Improvements in communication, clear explanation of service differences and flexibility around the timing of transitions may enhance the experience for patients and parents/carers.

Research limitations/implications

The service evaluation was limited to transition between two specialist ED services in one geographical location. The findings provide the basis for a wider research study to examine which factors are most important when planning transition from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining ED transitions in the UK. It provides valuable insight of the experience of service users and carers and highlights potential improvements when planning transitions for this patient group.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Kevin Doughty

Telecare services based on sensors that provide an early and identified warning of an emergency in the homes of vulnerable people are being established quickly across the…

Abstract

Telecare services based on sensors that provide an early and identified warning of an emergency in the homes of vulnerable people are being established quickly across the UK. More advanced systems based on lifestyle monitoring (LM) are being proposed that will be both reactive and responsive in nature. They will require the recording of much more data and will involve more system intelligence in order to analyse changes in a dynamic manner. Data will be collected both continuously from a battery of sensors, and intermittently from a variety of sources including monitoring centres and specialist medical devices. Many new applications will be possible ranging from an automatic assessment of risks and needs through to long‐term detection of a decline in well‐being and interventions using reminders and remotely controlled electrical equipment. Most of these applications will not be possible in a reliable manner using simple systems with few sensor inputs and limited or no system intelligence. More sophisticated systems will be capable of measuring subtle changes of relevance to many medical conditions. However, they will require significant attention to issues of ethics, consent, data ownership, storage and access because of their potentially intrusive nature.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Ozcan Saritas and Michael Keenan

Despite differences in political approaches and institutional frameworks, health and social services in all European Union (EU) Member States face similar challenges…

Abstract

Despite differences in political approaches and institutional frameworks, health and social services in all European Union (EU) Member States face similar challenges, notably the need to adjust to demographic ageing and to changing employment and family patterns. This article takes a closer look at some of those issues (drivers) that are likely to have significant implications for the future of the sector. On this basis, three diverging “integrated visions” for health and social services are presented. The first vision is a “best guesstimate” and assumes that current developmental targets, for example, on reducing cardiovascular disease, are generally met. The second vision is a “problem‐plagued” view of health and social services, where targets are missed and the current level of service generally stays the same or deteriorates. Finally, the third vision presents a more “visionary” picture of health and social services where services are largely transformed from what is known today. All “integrated visions” have been constructed from existing health‐care scenarios as well as the drivers identified earlier. The paper is rounded off with an account of some of the policy measures being implemented by the European Commission and Member States in addressing several of the areas highlighted as important for the future of the sector.

Details

Foresight, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Book part
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Lisa Buchter

Previous theories discuss how corporate managers can stir anti-discrimination laws away from their initial social goal by managerializing the law. Yet, other actors …

Abstract

Previous theories discuss how corporate managers can stir anti-discrimination laws away from their initial social goal by managerializing the law. Yet, other actors – notably insider activists – can contribute to move corporate regulations beyond merely symbolic compliance. I demonstrate this influence of activists with three cases studies: (1) LGBT activists for same-sex parental leave; (2) disability rights activists for implementing a quota; and (3) Muslim activists to secure accommodations in French workplaces. Through these cases, I show how activists can move corporate laws beyond compliance, pressure firms to go from merely symbolic to substantive compliance, and analyze mechanisms that explain their unequal success. Bringing together insights from the legal endogeneity theory and social movements theory, I analyze these activist legal intermediaries as actors faced with unequal structure of opportunities, and examine what factors hinder or favor an activist-driven legal endogeneity. I demonstrate the impact of more prescriptive regulations, the institutional power of union representatives (and their alignment with activists’ claims), reputational stakes for companies, and the resources of activists themselves (legal expertise, ability to reframe laws, and informal power within their organizations). Last, I show how activists leverage organizational and legal tools (collective agreement, diversity policies) to induce recoupling between formal commitments and informal practices.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Peter Tatham, Frank Stadler, Abigail Murray and Ramon Z. Shaban

Whilst there is a growing body of research which discusses the use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) (otherwise known as “drones”) to transport medical supplies…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst there is a growing body of research which discusses the use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) (otherwise known as “drones”) to transport medical supplies, almost all reported cases employ short range aircraft. The purpose of this paper is to consider the advantages and challenges inherent in the use of long endurance remotely piloted aircraft systems (LE-RPAS) aircraft to support the provision of medical supplies to remote locations – specifically “medical maggots” used in maggot debridement therapy (MDT) wound care.

Design/methodology/approach

After introducing both MDT and the LE-RPAS technology, the paper first reports on the outcomes of a case study involving 11 semi-structured interviews with individuals who either have experience and expertise in the use of LE-RPAS or in the provision of healthcare to remote communities in Western Australia. The insights gained from this case study are then synthesised to assess the feasibility of LE-RPAS assisted delivery of medical maggots to those living in such geographically challenging locations.

Findings

No insuperable challenges to the concept of using LE-RPAS to transport medical maggots were uncovered during this research – rather, those who contributed to the investigations from across the spectrum from operators to users, were highly supportive of the overall concept.

Practical implications

The paper offers an assessment of the feasibility of the use of LE-RPAS to transport medical maggots. In doing so, it highlights a number of infrastructure and organisational challenges that would need to be overcome to operationalise this concept. Whilst the particular context of the paper relates to the provision of medical support to a remote location of a developed country, the core benefits and challenges that are exposed relate equally to the use of LE-RPAS in a post-disaster response. To this end, the paper offers a high-level route map to support the implementation of the concept.

Social implications

The paper proposes a novel approach to the efficient and effective provision of medical care to remote Australian communities which, in particular, reduces the need to travel significant distances to obtain treatment. In doing so, it emphasises the importance in gaining acceptance of both the use of MDT and also the operation of RPAS noting that these have previously been employed in a military, as distinct from humanitarian, context.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how the use of LE-RPAS to support remote communities offers the potential to deliver healthcare at reduced cost compared to conventional approaches. The paper also underlines the potential benefits of the use of MDT to address the growing wound burdens in remote communities. Finally, the paper expands on the existing discussion of the use of RPAS to include its capability to act as the delivery mechanism for medical maggots.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Valerie Wilson

This paper explores intensive self‐management of type 1 diabetes with insulin pump therapy as an enabling technology and reports barriers in the communication process with…

Abstract

This paper explores intensive self‐management of type 1 diabetes with insulin pump therapy as an enabling technology and reports barriers in the communication process with health professionals providing diabetes care who are unfamiliar with this treatment. Questionnaire responses and telephone interviews from a study conducted with 78 people using pump therapy in 2006 showed that individuals attending diabetes centres that were not pump‐trained suffered poor communication and a lack of support for intensive diabetes self‐management. As a result, some pump users did not visit their diabetes centre for care and management of the condition, preferring to communicate with the pump manufacturer and a national insulin pump therapy support organisation because they were familiar with the treatment. Nonetheless, all pump users had a strong sense of self‐efficacy concerning their mastery of the treatment technology to prevent, delay or stabilise the chronic complications of type 1 diabetes. Conclusions are linked to the Insulin Pump Services Report (Department of Health, 2007) and specific guidance on the use of pump therapy with patients by trained health professionals.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

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