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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Bernie Sloan

Looks at the needs to begin planning for remote access to onlinepublic access catalogs (OPACs), and to consider the special needs of theremote user – beginning at the…

Abstract

Looks at the needs to begin planning for remote access to online public access catalogs (OPACs), and to consider the special needs of the remote user – beginning at the institutional level – for example, how well does the campus network match up to the ideal service level of easy access for every faculty member and student? Considers other possibilities, such as dial access, dedicated workstations or local area networks. Makes the point that the existence of the service must be advertised, potential users of remote services are unlikely to be aware of its existence if it has not been advertised outside of the library itself. Document delivery is another important issue that needs to be addressed if the remote user is to receive satisfactory service levels.

Details

Academic and Library Computing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-4769

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Kirsten M. Rosacker and Robert E. Rosacker

This study aims to revisit and extends the work of Rosacker and Rosacker (2012) that called for increased interdisciplinary efforts to address and solve the critical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to revisit and extends the work of Rosacker and Rosacker (2012) that called for increased interdisciplinary efforts to address and solve the critical issues (critical success factors) facing technologically-enabled remote-access voting platforms. It builds upon the background platform presented there, which included an historical timeline of information and communication technologies and an e-voting literature review, and extends that work by providing a state-of-the-art update and review of the rapidly changing voter environment from societal, technological and experiential studies over the past decade. Specific focus is directed at technology-enabled, remote-access voting, while also considering the important role technological advances can play in improving voter registration/confirmation procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a brief review of significant societal and technological changes, including the rapid evolution of the internet of things, is undertaken to frame the discussion. Second, a sample of several technology-enabled, remote-access voting experiments are reviewed and critiqued. Third, currently available technical solutions targeting technology-enabled voter registration and vote casting are offered as the next step in the process that will ultimately lead to remote-access voting becoming widely deployed across smart devices. Finally, some contemporaneous conclusions are tendered.

Findings

Society and technology-enabled devices have each witnessed myriad changes and advancements in the second decade of the 21st century. These have led to numerous remote-access voting experiments across the globe that have overwhelmingly proven the concept of technology-enabled, remote-access voting to be viable while also identifying/reasserting issues (critical success factors) that continue to restrain its full implementation. Importantly, none of the problems identified is fatal to the concept.

Originality/value

This study considers the issue of technologically-enabled, remote-access voting focussing on the impacts associated with the portfolio of recent societal and technological advancements including the many vexing concerns and issues presented by the coronavirus pandemic. Social distancing is limiting access to the traditional methods of in-person voting for both election officials and voters bringing into question the November 2020 US national election. Calls for expanded mail voting options and the requisite federal funding required to support these efforts are increasing, widespread and broadly persuasive. Wholly missing in this debate is an exhaustive consideration and discussion of technologically enhanced, remote-access voting systems and their role in filling the void.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Tanmay De Sarkar

– The paper intends to provide an overall picture how libraries use different tools, integrated to remote access facility and offer improved off-campus services.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper intends to provide an overall picture how libraries use different tools, integrated to remote access facility and offer improved off-campus services.

Design/methodology/approach

Web content analysis was used as research method to collect data from academic libraries in four continents.

Findings

The results highlight that libraries use different types of online tools integrated to remote access facility; however, the techniques involved and purposes of use vary from library to library. Citing numerous examples, the paper approaches to draw a comparative figure of differential use of remote access tools across the continents.

Originality/value

The paper is the first of its kind and may guide library professionals to plan and implement online tools, integrated with remote access facility and support education, research and training of the parent institution.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Bernie Sloan

This column marks the first in a series dealing with networked access to online public access catalogs (OPACs). Networked and remote access can take many forms. A local…

Abstract

This column marks the first in a series dealing with networked access to online public access catalogs (OPACs). Networked and remote access can take many forms. A local user can access a local OPAC through a local campus network. A local user can access remote OPACs using the local OPAC as a gateway. Remote users can access the local OPAC through external networks such as the Internet.

Details

Academic and Library Computing, vol. 8 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-4769

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Shyamala C. Sivakumar and William Robertson

An integrated Web engine (IWE) has been developed by the Internetworking program at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada to deliver remote learning experience to…

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Abstract

An integrated Web engine (IWE) has been developed by the Internetworking program at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada to deliver remote learning experience to geographically remote Master's students. The University intends to increase its student base through online education, retaining the same quality of interactions as the onsite program. To this end, the IWE accommodates three technology‐enabled learning environments that correlate with the three pedagogical approaches and types of onsite interaction. Discusses the e‐learning metrics, pedagogical and technical considerations that influence the design and implementation of the IWE environment. The IWE uses de facto networking standards, commercial and broadband Internet connectivity to ensure real‐time secure interaction with equipment and deliver lectures respectively. A four‐tier role architecture, consisting of faculty, local, remote facilitators, and students, has been determined to be appropriate and adapted to maintain academic integrity and offer the same quality of interaction as the onsite program.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Robert E. Rosacker and Kirsten Rosacker

The purpose of this paper is to provide a timely discussion of the important topic of remoteaccess voting technology.

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236

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a timely discussion of the important topic of remoteaccess voting technology.

Design/methodology/approach

First, an introduction to the topic is offered; second the existing state of the art is considered; third, a brief history of electronic and internet voting methods is presented; and fourth, a short list of critical success factors for remoteaccess voting is presented. Finally, a conclusion is offered surrounding how academics and practitioners can collaboratively proceed to address the salient issues and barriers that currently prohibit the advancement of remoteaccess voting.

Findings

There is a brief and largely successful history involving applications of information communication technologies (ICTs) and computer technology to assist in data capture and tabulation of democratic elections. While several critical issues have been identified, none has been so significant that an end‐game strategy should be invoked rather than continued innovation. Concurrently, the business world has witnessed an expanding use of computer‐based infrastructures and enhanced ICTs to facilitate the processing of remoteaccess commercial transactions. These advancements have provided a rich opportunity to seek out, identify, and address the substantive operational issues permitting the successful expansion of a variety of business methods, models, and processes. While these successes have provided a solid foundation upon which e‐government voting systems can be attempted, such a process improvement has been elusive to this date with many of the real issues and concerns seeming to be too large to resolve.

Originality/value

The paper considers the important issue of remoteaccess voting as a means for supporting the expansion and refinement of democratic processes across the world through increased citizen participation.

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Walter Matli

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected most organisations' workplaces and productivity. Organisations have had to make provision for staff to operate remotely following the…

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4610

Abstract

Purpose

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected most organisations' workplaces and productivity. Organisations have had to make provision for staff to operate remotely following the implementation of lockdown regulations around the world, because the pandemic has led to restrictions on movement and the temporary closure of workplace premises. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights from remote workers' experiences in South Africa about immediate conversion from the normal workplace environment to working remotely from home. The structuration theory was adopted to understand the social structural challenges experienced by staff working from home.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a Web-based survey, administered when the Covid-19 pandemic resulted in movement restrictions, using the judgemental sampling technique.

Findings

The results are presented using both external and internal features that are linked to the social structures experienced by remote workers who participated in the survey. The key findings indicate that despite the positive aspects of remote working using advances in technology, there are also negative aspects and risks attached to remote working such as work overload and pressures to perform timeously. This can pose severe threats to workers' routines and lifestyle, and the lack of interaction can impinge on their health and general well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The online survey was carried out with first-time remote workers who were the target for the study. Some respondents may have had an affinity for remote working because of the novelty. The sample size may not be generalised, as the collected sample is moderately small, although the purpose of the paper was to report on a small sample size, given the rapidity of the study.

Practical implications

The paper seeks to highlight social structures that exist in South Africa, which accentuate the resource divide for remote workers. Also, the paper aims to encourage organisations (employers) to better understand challenges that workers encountered while working from their homes during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown restrictions.

Originality/value

The relevance of this paper is in its contribution to the structuration theory and remote working literature, as well as to the study of these topics in the context of South Africa.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Mary E. Engle

In the early 1980s, Luis Alvarez and his colleagues added a new dimension to Darwin's theory of evolution. With evidence from studies of the earth's crust between the…

Abstract

In the early 1980s, Luis Alvarez and his colleagues added a new dimension to Darwin's theory of evolution. With evidence from studies of the earth's crust between the cretacious and tertiary layers, they postulated that the traditional slow, gradual mutation of species over eons was also punctuated with occasional major changes, often catastrophic, that caused leaps in evolution in relatively short “moments” of history. The extinction of the dinosaurs and half the other animal species alive between the cretacious and tertiary periods of earth's history was one such momentous change, forever altering the evolution of animal species.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Fuyuki Ishikawa, Yasuyuki Tahara, Nobukazu Yoshioka and Shinichi Honiden

A general framework for mobile Web services ‐ which are Web services with the ability to migrate from one host to another ‐ is proposed. In this framework, a mobile Web…

Abstract

A general framework for mobile Web services ‐ which are Web services with the ability to migrate from one host to another ‐ is proposed. In this framework, a mobile Web service is composed of a combination of a BPEL process description, service components to be carried, and migration behavior descriptions using simple but expressive rules. The semantics of the descriptions are defined using Mobile Ambients, namely, a formal model of concurrent mobile processes. With this framework, it is thus possible to add or change migration behaviors without having to modify the BPEL process.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

F. Barrero, S. Toral and S. Gallardo

The purpose of this paper is to present a remote lab and a web‐based teaching environment which provides access for remote control of Digital Signal Processors (DSP…

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1000

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a remote lab and a web‐based teaching environment which provides access for remote control of Digital Signal Processors (DSP device) and real instrumentation. The framework, named eDSPLab, has been designed using LabVIEW for debugging and testing Digital Signal Processing (DSP) experiments in a real lab without physical and temporal restrictions, and it has been integrated as a service in a modern e‐learning application domain and a Learning Management System (LMS) to reinforce its utility.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is presented to provide background to the progressive role that DSP and DSP devices play in Information and Communications Technology (ICT)‐demanded job profiles, and the role that a computer‐mediated environment plays in modern teaching methodologies. The web service access control architecture is defined.

Findings

The paper provides new insights into the use of the Internet for laboratory teaching.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to one particular remote lab. Results could be extended if students' perceptions and their acceptance of the new e‐learning technology are examined using an information system theory, such as the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need for adapting the teaching methodology applied in an undergraduate Advanced Microprocessor course of the Telecommunication Engineering degree at the University of Seville, Spain, allowing the development of laboratory experiments anywhere and anytime, avoiding one of the problems in lab training: the low number of laboratory working places in relation to the high number of enrolled students. The system developed has been successfully used during the last academic years in a course involving more than 200 students.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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