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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Mahalia Jackman, Roland Craigwell and Winston Moore

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper estimates a panel data model using a database containing 20 small island developing states (SIDS) observed over annual intervals between 1986 and 2005.

Findings

The results suggest that, in general, remittance flows have a stabilising influence on output and investment volatility. However, given the importance of these flows to SIDS, the volatility of remittances also has a significant and positive impact on both investment and consumption volatility.

Practical implications

The policy implications of the study's findings is that SIDS (similar to how oil‐producing nations take oil price fluctuations into account when considering policy changes) may have to monitor and forecast future remittance flows and take these projections into account when making changes to either their monetary or fiscal policy stance.

Originality/value

Workers' remittances have grown dramatically worldwide, particularly in SIDS, where they constitute one of the main sources of foreign exchange. Given the importance of these flows to economic growth and development in these countries, this study examines the potential link between remittances and economic volatility.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Syed Tehseen Jawaid and Syed Ali Raza

This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea.

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Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has employed annual time series data over the period of 1980 to 2009. Johansen and Jeuuselius's cointegration technique, error correction model, and sensitivity analysis have been performed to analyze the long‐run, short‐run relationships and robustness of the results, respectively.

Findings

Cointegration results confirm that there exists significant positive long‐run relationship between remittances and economic growth in Korea, while, significant negative relationship exist between remittances and economic growth in China. Error correction model confirms the significant positive short‐run relationship of workers' remittances with economic growth in Korea, while the results of China were insignificant in short run. Causality analysis confirms unidirectional causality runs from workers' remittances to economic growth, in both China and Korea. Sensitivity analysis confirms that the results are robust.

Practical implications

It is suggested that Korea should form friendly policies to ensure the continuous inflows of workers' remittances and their efficient utilization to ensure economic growth. On the other hand, China should keep an eye to reducing voluntary unemployment, which leads to decrease in productivity and growth in the country.

Originality/value

The paper provides some empirical evidence of whether workers' remittances have contributed significantly to large open economies.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2022

Ghazi Al-Assaf

The purpose of the current study is to examine the effect of international remittances on the labour market participation of women and men left behind in Jordan. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to examine the effect of international remittances on the labour market participation of women and men left behind in Jordan. The study particularly focuses on the labour supply side for both women and men.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on micro-data from the Jordan Labour Market Panel Survey (JLMPS) in 2010, a nationally representative survey, and addresses the endogeneity of receiving remittances through an Instrumental Variable (IV) approach.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that remittances are found to have a negative and significant impact on labour supply of both women and men. On average, women who live in remittance receiving household are about 5% points less likely to perform any market work, 3% points less likely to be in wage employment and about 8% points less likely to be engaged in own work. While, men who live in remittance receiving household are about 25% points less likely to perform any market work, 5% points less likely to be in wage employment and about 10% points less likely to be engaged in own work. When the author instruments for remittance receipt of the household, the effect of remittances on likelihood to work is found larger for both women and men.

Originality/value

Workers' remittances are considered as one of the vital financial sources for many households in labour exporting countries, most of the investigation on the effects of such financial flows concentrate on the macroeconomic effects. It is therefore important to conduct empirical investigation to fairly and accurately evaluate the impact of these flows on the Jordanian labour market at a microeconomic level.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Yan Xing, Moshe Semyonov and Yitchak Haberfeld

Remittances sent by immigrants have long been viewed as a means to combat poverty, to improve consumption, and to raise standard of living. The present study examines the…

Abstract

Remittances sent by immigrants have long been viewed as a means to combat poverty, to improve consumption, and to raise standard of living. The present study examines the impact of remittances on the economic well-being of Indian households. The analysis is conducted on a randomly selected representative sample of households in Rajasthan. Three types of households are examined: 575 households having current labor migrants, 162 never having migrants, and 232 not having migrants at present but sent migrants in the past. Analysis of the data reveals meaningful differences between the three types of households. Specifically, those having labor migrants are characterized by the highest household income and standard of living. Further analyses suggest that although remittances are likely to improve economic well-being and to secure a higher standard of living they do not have long lasting effect on the economic well-being of the families when migration ends.

Details

Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Don DeVoretz and Florin Vadean

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the…

Abstract

This chapter analyses the effect of cultural differences among ethnic groups on the remittance behaviour of native and immigrant households in Canada. In contrast to the New Economic of Labour Migration (NELM) literature that examines remittance motivation in the framework of extended family agreements, we embed remittances in a formal demand system, suggesting that they represent expenditures on social relations with relatives and/or friends and contribute to membership in social/religious organisations respectively. The results indicate strong ethnic group cultural differences in the remittance behaviour of recent Asian immigrant households and highlight the importance of differentiating with respect to cultural background when analysing the determinants of remittances.

Details

Migration and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-153-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2013

Steffen Dalsgaard

Purpose – The chapter discusses the importance of remittances for the way rural people in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, engage with capitalism in the form of…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter discusses the importance of remittances for the way rural people in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, engage with capitalism in the form of development, wage labor, and the modern consumer economy.Methodology/approach – The chapter draws upon a combination of original ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2002 and 2008 and readings of previous anthropological research about Manus.Findings – The chapter shows how the remittances of goods and money are part of the maintenance of long-term exchange relationships between emigrants and their rural kin, and how remittances are regarded as crucial in fostering local development. The remittances comprise a large proportion of the flow of money into Manus. They also form social ties between migrants and villagers, and may facilitate the return of migrants to their home village. The moral conflicts and evaluations of status and leadership tied into the remittance practices and the strategies employed by returning migrants are explained as the articulation of different values rather than one system supplanting the other.Originality/value – The aspect of remittances related to return migration is particularly under-theorized in anthropology. In this way the chapter has value to both researchers specializing in remittance-economies or local-level politics and development planners and practitioners.

Details

Engaging with Capitalism: Cases from Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-542-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 March 2015

Jakhongir Kakhkharov and Alexandr Akimov

Remittances in the former Soviet Union have increased rapidly over the past decade. In some countries of the former Soviet Union, remittances have reached staggering…

Abstract

Remittances in the former Soviet Union have increased rapidly over the past decade. In some countries of the former Soviet Union, remittances have reached staggering levels. For example, in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan remittances now account for over 10% of GDP, with Tajikistan leading the pack with annual remittances of approximately 40% of GDP. Remittances in this group of economies now exceed foreign direct investment and foreign assistance. Because this rapid rise in remittances is a relatively recent trend and obtaining reliable data is difficult, this area of research has been underexplored.

The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of existing remittance measurement methodologies. Moreover, we propose practical methods to adjust the Central Bank of Russia data to derive more accurate remittances estimates in selected countries of the former Soviet Union. These selected economies are major recipients of remittances among transition economies and account for as much as 10% of remittances worldwide. There have been attempts to provide this type of estimation in individual countries; however, there have been no studies, to our knowledge, that propose a general methodology for the region.

Details

Neo-Transitional Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-681-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Hem C. Basnet, Josiah Baker and Ficawoyi Donou-Adonsou

The purpose of this study is to examine two issues about remittances in Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua). First…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine two issues about remittances in Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua). First, whether the inflow of remittances impacts income in the long run. Second, what motivates migrants to send remittances? The first issue is analyzed in the context of a permanent income hypothesis, while the second is analyzed in the context of altruism versus self-interest motives.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel cointegration method is used to establish the long-run relationship between the variables under consideration. Further, this study uses the fully modified ordinary least squares method (FMOLS) to estimate the impact of remittances on income and consumption. The pooled mean group (PMG) estimation is used.

Findings

The test results indicate that remittances into Central American countries do not promote growth in the long run. Central American families may perceive remittances as a permanent income stream and will increase their current consumption. Additionally, the test results indicate that sending remittances of the Central American migrants is mainly driven by altruism. Their primary motive is to support left-behind families at times of economic hardship.

Research limitations/implications

Findings provide an important implication for these Central American countries, as they have potential to boost income by utilizing remittance money in productivity-enhancing activities. This study could also provide valuable information for the governments of labor-exporting countries around the world to encourage and incentivize remittance recipient families to utilize those funds for income-generating activities.

Originality/value

In Central America, this is probably the first attempt in the literature to analyze the impact of remittances in the context of permanent income hypothesis and the motivation of Central American workers to send remittances to their countries of origin.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2022

Syed Tehseen Jawaid, Lubna Khan and Imtiaz Arif

Despite the reasonable surge of remittances and imports in Pakistan, very less attention has been given to this area. To bridge the gap, this study aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the reasonable surge of remittances and imports in Pakistan, very less attention has been given to this area. To bridge the gap, this study aims to explore the relationship of worker’s remittances and imports of Pakistan at both aggregate and disaggregate levels. Also, this research focuses on investigating whether remitted income substitute or complement imports of the country.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve these goals, the authors use annual time-series data from 1974–2016.

Findings

Empirical findings obtained from the autoregressive distributed lag model method suggest that remittances substitute imports in Pakistan. It is also found that remittances not only substitute aggregate imports but also act as a substitute at different disaggregated levels. Further, it is documented that higher economic growth increases imports, whereas the real exchange rate for imports is inversely related to imports at both levels.

Originality/value

These empirical findings also draw some substantive policy implications for the state owners and policy advisers.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

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