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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2014

Gary R. Weaver and Jason M. Stansbury

Religious institutions can affect organizational practices when employees bring their religious commitments and practices into the workplace. But those religious

Abstract

Religious institutions can affect organizational practices when employees bring their religious commitments and practices into the workplace. But those religious commitments function in the midst of other organizational factors that influence the working out of employees’ religious commitments. This process can generate varying outcomes in organizational contexts, ranging from a heightened effect of religious commitment on employee behavior to a negligible or nonexistent influence of religion on employee behavior. Relying on social identity theory and schematic social cognition as unifying frameworks for the study of religious behavior, we develop a theoretically informed approach to understanding how and why the religious beliefs, commitments and practices employees bring to work have varying behavioral impacts.

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Religion and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-693-4

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2011

Brian Paciotti, Peter Richerson, Billy Baum, Mark Lubell, Tim Waring, Richard McElreath, Charles Efferson and Ed Edsten

We investigated the effect of religion on generosity, interpersonal trust, and cooperation by using games developed by experimental economists (Dictator, Trust, and Public…

Abstract

We investigated the effect of religion on generosity, interpersonal trust, and cooperation by using games developed by experimental economists (Dictator, Trust, and Public Goods). In these experiments, individuals were paired or grouped with unknown strangers to test the degree to which religion promotes prosocial behavior. We evaluated group- and individual-level effects of religion on prosocial behavior across the three games. Although playing the games in a religious setting showed no overall difference as compared to a secular setting, we did find a weak association between some individual-level dimensions of religiosity and behavior in some of the games. The weak association between religion and behavior is consistent with theory and empirical studies using similar measures – the anonymous pairing and grouping of the economic games may moderate individual-level effects of religion. Our research is a strong complement to the empirical literature because the three studies involved a large and diverse sample and used sensitive instruments that have been found to reliably measure prosocial behavior.

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The Economics of Religion: Anthropological Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-228-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nazlida Muhamad, Vai Shiem Leong and Dick Mizerski

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and behavioural responses.

Design/methodology/approach

MANOVA and MANCOVA were used to examine the influence of religious orientation on young Malaysian Muslims’ product knowledge, and the extent of religious orientation and gender on Muslim consumers’ attitude and behaviour towards three contemporary fatwa rulings of products.

Findings

Respondents’ religious orientation differentiates their knowledge on fatwa prohibition ruling of selected brand and behaviours. Consumers’ religious orientation and gender explain consumers’ behavioural responses to variables of the Theory of Planned Behaviour for three behaviours. Evidence suggests that ruling types affects (conditional and unconditional) consumers’ responses.

Research limitations/implications

Greater insights are provided on Muslims’ motivation to search information of controversial products, and their subsequent perception and behavioural reactions to controversial products. Findings are limited to the Malaysian Muslim consumers.

Practical implications

The fact that contemporary fatwa reached young Muslim generations indicates that managers have to be wary of fatwa to predict Muslim consumers’ marketplace behaviours.

Social implications

A significant number of young Malaysian Muslims are keeping abreast with contemporary fatwa. This suggests that they received an early and substantial exposure to Islamic way of life through their socialisation.

Originality/value

This study offer insights into the understandings of the young Muslim generation regarding contemporary fatwa on products, and revealed significant findings in relation to consumer product knowledge and religious influences on consumer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Tajamul Islam and Uma Chandrasekaran

This study aims to explore whether religiosity influences ecologically conscious consumption behaviour (ECCB) among Muslim consumers in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether religiosity influences ecologically conscious consumption behaviour (ECCB) among Muslim consumers in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was developed and administered to a sample of 191 young male Muslim respondents. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated a significant positive correlation between religiosity and ECCB. Pro-religious and intrinsically religious consumers reported higher importance to ECCB than non-religious and extrinsically religious consumers. It is, therefore, concluded that religiosity plays an important role in determining ECCB among Muslim consumers in India.

Research limitations/implications

The study sample comprised Indian university students as respondents, whose consumption behaviours may be constrained by limited independent income. Further, only male students have been included because of methodological considerations.

Practical implications

This study suggests that green marketers can use religiosity as a possible segmentation variable to effectively position their products. Religious messages or symbols can be invoked in advertising and other communication campaigns by marketers to gain acceptance for green products and consumption behaviours among consumers.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the role of religiosity and its impact on consumer behaviour. The present study sought to address this gap in literature and offers preliminary insights about how marketers can effectively use religious symbols for marketing green products to consumers. The study is an initial attempt to provide elementary understanding about the consumption behaviour of Indian Muslims who have been insufficiently investigated by marketing and consumer researchers.

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Brandon Randolph-Seng, Brandt A. Smith and Andrea Slobodnikova

Although organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is widely known to have a positive ethical impact in work organizations, the causal antecedents that influence the…

Abstract

Although organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is widely known to have a positive ethical impact in work organizations, the causal antecedents that influence the likelihood of such behaviors among employees is understudied. We addressed this gap by examining the influence of visual images of people on relevant work-related behavior in a work-like setting using the theoretical frame of the social identity perspective. We found that students in a university setting, who were exposed to religious-themed student images, exhibited slower helping behaviors toward the organization than those who were exposed to organizational-themed student images. The results of the current study provide the first-known experimental confirmation of organizational identity as a causal antecedent of OCB.

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Malihe Siyavooshi, Abdullah Foroozanfar and Yaser Sharifi

This study aims to conduct an experimental investigation into the effectiveness of using Islamic values and environmental knowledge in advertising for plant disposable…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to conduct an experimental investigation into the effectiveness of using Islamic values and environmental knowledge in advertising for plant disposable containers on the level of willingness to purchase such products for religious ceremonies and rituals among Muslim consumers in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 270 individuals participating in one of the religious assemblies in the city of Shiraz in Iran was classified into three groups (a control and two experimental groups). A pretest was administered for each group; then both experimental groups received brochures whose contents were associated with environmental and religious messages about environmental protection. After four days, a post-test was similarly conducted for each group. The data were collected through a questionnaire and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance.

Findings

The results revealed that the use of religious and environmental messages in advertising for plant disposable containers could boost the willingness to purchase such containers for religious ceremonies and rituals; however, the effectiveness of using religious messages was stronger compared to that of the environmental ones.

Research limitations implications

Given that the present study was conducted based on an experimental research design in a real context, there was the possibility of the presence of other variables outside the control of the study design and affecting its results.

Practical implications

Increased awareness regarding the harmful environmental impacts of plastic containers and emphasis on religious duties to protect the environment can affect targeting a sector of the Muslim community endowed with strong religious beliefs.

Originality/value

This study confirmed that consumer values and beliefs could have effects on their purchase and consumption behaviors.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Thuy D. Nguyen, Shih Yung Chou, Charles Blankson and Phillip Wilson

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a systematic view of religious consumption and its iterative influences on consumers, as well as their differences in attitudes, values and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach – both qualitative and quantitative – the study develops religious self-transformation and self-categorization scales to empirically evaluate the hypotheses.

Findings

The convergence of consumption, self-identification and religious attitudes and behaviors proffer an essentially subjective concept useful in understanding the existential reflection and supernatural orientation that individuals may seek through consumption. Cluster analysis (based on product, services, media and practices) reveals four quadrants. The non-religious (religious) group has low (high) consumption in all four consumption categories Self-categorization (self-transformation) group has high (low) level of product consumption, but low (high) in all three other categories. This research presented four invisible identities that are visibly different in terms of life satisfaction, religious brand preference, dollars spending on religious products and monetary donation.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers one medium-size city as opposed to all types of cities. All religious affiliated and nonaffiliated respondents are included in the total sample.

Practical implications

The study offers new insights into the triadic relationship between religious self-identification, religious consumption, and the marketplace that can be used in branding, segmentation, targeting, positioning, and persuasive advertising, public relation and social media, and services marketing.

Social implications

Religion addresses the nature of existence. In this religion–consumer–brand nexus, consumption is a way for consumers to experience and immense themselves in the sacred to solidify, communicate, transform, improve and transport who they are capitalizing on religious self-identification can affectively promote positive social change.

Originality/value

This work proposes four invisible identities that are different in consumption of religious products and services in terms of patterns and purposes. These groups of consumers shape the marketplace through the derived utility of their religious consumption based on their self-identification, which in turn influences their religious brand preference.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Muhammad Mohsin Butt, Susan Rose, Stephen Wilkins and Junaid Ul Haq

Multinational corporations (MNCs) that want to compete in markets worldwide should not underestimate the influences of religion on consumer demand. Almost one quarter of…

Abstract

Purpose

Multinational corporations (MNCs) that want to compete in markets worldwide should not underestimate the influences of religion on consumer demand. Almost one quarter of the world’s population is Muslim so it is important for MNCs to get into the Muslim mind set when operating in countries where Islam has a large influence. The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which consumer-based brand equity in a religious market results from the psychological and behavioural characteristics of consumers rather than from product characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey method was adopted, using a total sample of 551 Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. A holistic model conceptualising three potential psychological and behavioural predictors of consumer-based halal brand equity (CBHBE) was created and then tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The strength of an individual’s religious identity was found to be a strong predictor of consumer halal choice behaviour and perceived self-expressive religious benefits. Consumers’ halal choice behaviour and perceived self-expressive benefits directly predict CBHBE. Moreover, consumer halal choice behaviour partially mediates the relationship between self-expressive benefits and CBHBE.

Practical implications

The authors conclude that firms targeting Muslim consumers can maximise CBHBE by focussing their marketing strategies on the three psychological and behavioural constructs identified in the model. For example, by using halal certification logos and providing convincing information about the halalness of their brand, businesses can facilitate Muslim consumers’ search processes in relation to their choice behaviour.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing international branding literature in two main ways. First, it introduces and defines the concept of CBHBE. Second, it identifies and empirically validates the important psychological and behavioural predictors of CBHBE.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Fadila Grine and Munazza Saeed

The purpose of this research is to analyze the motivation behind the hijab behavior in a multicultural environment of Malaysia; it is a religious obligation or fashion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze the motivation behind the hijab behavior in a multicultural environment of Malaysia; it is a religious obligation or fashion behavior. In an analytic thinking of motivation in influencing women in wearing a hijab, learning from the social environment on religious obligation and fashion in hijab has been discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative analysis has been conducted for 100 hijab-wearing female students in the University of Malaya.

Findings

The findings were tabulated and the outcomes proved that most of the women took the hijab as a religious obligation instead of fashion motivation. Muslim women are still taking on the religious obligation in styling up the hijab. Modification in the hijab can be accepted in Malaysia, but the substantial design to wear the hijab is an obligation.

Originality/value

This study exclusively discusses the hijab as fashion and religious obligation within the context of Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2012

Gabriele Ballarino and Cristiano Vezzoni

Purpose – In order to study how religious behaviour is evolving in contemporary societies, the chapter looks at the relation between the individuals' position in social…

Abstract

Purpose – In order to study how religious behaviour is evolving in contemporary societies, the chapter looks at the relation between the individuals' position in social stratification and their participation to the weekly mass, and at its evolution in contemporary Italy.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The data come from the Italian National Election Study (ITANES) database, including national representative surveys from 1968 to 2006, and are analyzed with logit models.

Findings – Weekly mass participation has decreased from 1968 to 2006. The trend was rapid in the 1960s and 1970s, has slowed in the 1980s, but it has started again in the 1990s. Ceteris paribus, the upper class, shows a consistently more religious behaviour than the intermediate and the lower ones, and that the least educated are more religious. There is also evidence of a strong and consistent cohort effect, persisting across the considered period. Each cohort does not change much its participation to the weekly mass over time, but each new cohort shows a lower level of participation.

Research limitations/Implications – The findings give support to the classical secularization thesis, despite the many critiques addressed to it since the 1990s. Given that Italy is one of the most religious Western countries, this is a quite important finding. Some support is also given to the hypothesis of religion as an ‘instrumentum regni’, according to which it is in the interest of the higher social strata to be more religious, as religion supports and legitimates existing patterns of social inequality. Findings concerning cohorts point to socialization as the actual mechanism changing behaviours and attitudes.

Details

Religion, Work and Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-347-7

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1 – 10 of over 17000