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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2019

W. Y. Alice Chan and Bruce Collet

Discussion of religion and education continues to evoke conceptions of confessional teaching; however, research and educational practices in recent decades illustrate an…

Abstract

Discussion of religion and education continues to evoke conceptions of confessional teaching; however, research and educational practices in recent decades illustrate an expanded understanding that relates to the teaching of, about, and from religion across formal and non-formal educational spaces in secular and religious spheres. An expanded understanding also illustrates various intersections between religion and education that extend beyond religious or non-sectarian instruction, to include everything from the recognition and accommodation of religious student identities in K-12 public school settings, to the internationalization of religious higher education. Drawing on the Comparative and International Education Society’s Religion & Education Special Interest Group’s programing and activities, this paper aims to present a brief summary of trends observed both in research and practice concerning religion and education among educators worldwide, and highlights the place of religion in our growing recognition of intersectionality, one that occurs between academics and the community.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Giuseppina Autiero

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the causal link between religion and the formation of human capital. It takes into consideration that, though religion may transmit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the causal link between religion and the formation of human capital. It takes into consideration that, though religion may transmit a system of values that positively affect children’s education, it can also be characterized by a traditionalist dimension. The latter may hamper children’s self-determination and their educational achievements. Nevertheless, religious values may adapt to the cultural changes due to economic development and modernization and become less conservative.

Design/methodology/approach

The above aspects are investigated through an overlapping generations model with human capital where parents’ human capital and the religion in which individuals have been raised, characterize family background.

Findings

The model’s predictions point to the crucial role that development may play in promoting education. For instance, if a moderate responsiveness of religious institutions to economic and cultural changes is associated with low development, conservative attitudes prevail in society. This undermines individual confidence in improving one’s socio-economic status through education and negatively affects children’s education. Whereas, a development level sufficiently high counterbalances the effects of a low ability of religious institutions to adjust to changes and fosters education.

Originality/value

Though the empirical literature widely acknowledges that religion affects economic growth, the hypothesis that the link between religion and economic performance may also pass through education has been overlooked. In this respect, the paper investigates on this relationship by taking religion as a force reactive to economic processes.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Kimberly R. Logan and James M.M. Hartwick

The purpose of this paper is to outline arguments for addressing religion in social studies teacher education, including strategies teacher educators might use on how and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline arguments for addressing religion in social studies teacher education, including strategies teacher educators might use on how and why pre-service teachers should incorporate teaching about religion in their classes. Topics addressed are: issues surrounding pre-service teachers’ religious identities; teaching pre-service teachers about legal issues associated with religion in public school classrooms (e.g. teaching about religion vs teaching for religion, First Amendment rights and constraints); teacher education’s role in developing religious knowledge and the influence of religion in the disciplines that comprise the social studies; and an overview of strategies and resources that teacher educators can use with their pre-service teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a literature review and arguments for addressing religion in social studies teacher education. A lesson plan and resources for teacher educators are also provided.

Findings

Teaching and talking about religion can no longer be marginalized or ignored within social studies teacher education. Whether it be the importance of pre-service teachers’ religious identities, legal issues related to public schooling or the influence of religion across the social studies disciplines – religion matters to social studies teacher education. As the current social, political and cultural realities attest, the influence of religion appears to be more and more significant in our interconnected and interdependent world.

Originality/value

Religious literacy is a key part of civic competence and if social studies is viewed as a way to help prepare a more informed citizenry – and a way to teach and promote dialogue across difference – then social studies teacher educators must find a way to include religion in their courses. By doing so, teacher educators encourage pre-service teachers to examine how religious identity may influence their teaching, and also help develop religious literacy and an understanding of how religion is integral to the various social studies disciplines. Ultimately, this important and often ignored work in teacher education may foster cultural understandings that will lead to a more informed and respectful society.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Colton T. Ames

The purpose of this paper is to provide teacher educators with a foundation for including religion in multicultural education classes. In doing so, they can foster more…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide teacher educators with a foundation for including religion in multicultural education classes. In doing so, they can foster more robust discussions of religion and its implications for equity and justice in K-12 classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece was adapted from the religion unit that the author designed for the multicultural education course, and is the combination of the author’s expertise in religious studies, and curriculum and instruction.

Findings

As a practice piece, this paper is meant to start discussions and reflections for teacher educators as to how we can better address religion when discussing multicultural education, and the implications of equity, diversity and social justice in the classroom.

Originality/value

The author hopes that this piece will contribute to a growing field of literature on how to foster discussions of religion in teacher education and K-12 classrooms. As a former religious studies educator, the author hopes to offer a perspective that combines the fields of curriculum and religious studies to create a more robust relationship that will foster democratic and civic engagement.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Emily McKendry-Smith

The relationship between religious belief and spousal choice in Nepal is examined, looking at how the importance that individuals place on their own religious faith…

Abstract

The relationship between religious belief and spousal choice in Nepal is examined, looking at how the importance that individuals place on their own religious faith influences their decision either to allow their parents and other relatives to arrange a marriage for them or to initiate their own love marriage. How the importance attached to religious faith within the individual’s family and neighborhood affects this decision, and how education modifies the relationship between religion and spousal choice are also looked at.

Ordinary least squares regression models are used to examine the relationship between spousal choice and key independent variables. Interaction terms are used to examine how education may moderate the relationship between personal, family, and neighborhood religious salience and spousal choice.

It is found that the effect of one’s neighbors’ faith operates differently based on one’s own level of education. The “moral communities” thesis is used to theorize that in neighborhoods where religion is regarded as very important, individuals need to expend more effort to maintain respectability, adhering to tradition by having arranged marriages. In neighborhoods where religion is less important, the weaker demands made by the “moral community” render individuals more free to choose their own spouses. For highly educated individuals, the effect of their neighbors’ religious belief is considerably reduced.

As Nepalis become more educated, they not only move out of the sphere of family influence, as discussed in previous research, but also away from being influenced by their neighbors.

Details

Intimate Relationships and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-610-5

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Giuseppina Autiero and Concetto Paolo Paulo Vinci

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how rulers by supporting religion influence the growth of human capital and physical capital.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how rulers by supporting religion influence the growth of human capital and physical capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider a model where the government, on the one hand, sets the output quota transferred to religious activities and workers and entrepreneurs, on the other, choose human and physical capital, which are complementary. The findings of the model are used to interpret some historical evidence.

Findings

When a religious denomination puts a strong emphasis on children’s education, the rulers who back religion, may encourage the diffusion of education among the followers of that denomination. Conversely secular rulers may face a religion that they consider a force opposing modernization and may develop a secular system promoting the diffusion of education. In both cases, the diffusion of education triggers the increase in physical capital and economic growth.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is to show how religion may be either a progressive force and promote education by contributing to economic growth or present a conservative dimension opposing the diffusion and rise of human capital.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2012

Christopher P. Scheitle and Buster G. Smith

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to better understand the connection between religious affiliation and educational attainment and how this connection has changed…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to better understand the connection between religious affiliation and educational attainment and how this connection has changed over time.

Methodology/Approach – We utilize the cumulative 1972–2008 General Social Surveys to examine the relationships between childhood religious affiliation, college degree attainment, and religious switching across three birth cohorts.

Findings – We find in early cohorts that traditions such as Conservative Protestantism and Catholicism are negatively associated with college degree attainment. However, switching out of those traditions is positively associated with obtaining a college degree. In later cohorts, these effects disappear.

Social implications – The finding that the relationships between religious affiliation and educational attainment are dramatically changing over time means that scholars, educators, and religious groups might need to revise their current thinking concerning the topic of religion and education.

Originality/Value of chapter – This research helps us better understand the complexities involved when thinking about the role of religion in education and vice versa. By explicitly considering the different causal and temporal factors involved, this analysis provides a more nuanced understanding of the connection between religious affiliation and educational attainment.

Details

Religion, Work and Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-347-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Matthew S. Hollstein and Todd S. Hawley

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative approach to studying religion in social studies classrooms through reframing. The authors encourage this reframing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative approach to studying religion in social studies classrooms through reframing. The authors encourage this reframing through the lens of citizenship and terror as a human experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a practitioner’s piece and did not include research methodology or design.

Findings

This is a practitioner’s piece and did not include any findings.

Practical implications

This paper presents practical approaches to examining religion in social studies classrooms through a comparison with citizenship and the lens of terror. The authors offer activities which current classroom teachers will be able to put into action immediately. In addition, the authors offer a detailed background for further study if teachers wish to learn more.

Social implications

This paper presents ways to study religion in the social studies and in the current fractured social environment the authors feel is needed. The authors wish to showcase how to examine a controversial issue in a reflective, respectful and honest fashion.

Originality/value

The authors present the idea of studying religion through the lens of terror while showcasing how it mirrors the requirements of citizenship. The authors believe that studying religion in this way in the social studies will help to demystify the topic and allow students to unpack religion as a topic in social studies.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Stephen M. Croucher, Kyle J. Holody, Manda V. Hicks, Deepa Oommen and Alfred DeMaris

This study sets out to examine conflict style preferences in India and the predictive effects of various demographic variables on conflict style preference.

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine conflict style preferences in India and the predictive effects of various demographic variables on conflict style preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered in India (n=827) among Muslims and Hindus. Conflict was measured using Oetzel's Conflict Style Measure. To answer the research questions, repeated measures ANOVA and multiple regressions were conducted.

Findings

The findings reveal that conflict style preference among Hindus in India differs significantly and that Hindus prefer the integrating and dominating styles, whilst showing the least inclination towards the avoiding and obliging styles. Muslims prefer the integrating and compromising styles and least prefer the dominating and avoiding styles. Analyses of the demographic variables' predictive influence reveal that age and sex are significant predictors for all five conflict styles for both Muslims and Hindus. Education has a mixed predictive influence on conflict style among Hindus and Muslims.

Research limitations/implications

Use of self‐report instruments and the majority of the participants coming from middle‐class backgrounds could limit the generalizability of the study.

Practical implications

The study calls for conflict mediators to consider the influence of group membership and educational level on conflict management/resolution. The research also discusses national/international conflict intervention.

Social implications

This paper informs individuals regarding the way in which two large religious and cultural groups differ in their approaches to conflict. For a nation that has experienced a history of conflict between these two cultural/religious groups, this paper can help shed light on how to bridge the conflict between them.

Originality/value

There are no studies directly comparing the conflict styles of Muslims and Hindus.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Stephen James Jackson

This paper explores religious education (RE) in South Australia from 1968–1980. It focuses especially on the collapse of the RE settlement from 1968–1972 and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores religious education (RE) in South Australia from 1968–1980. It focuses especially on the collapse of the RE settlement from 1968–1972 and the controversial legislation and subsequent curricula emerging from changes to the Education Act in 1972.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon archival materials, published sources from the South Australian Institute of Teachers, the South Australian Education Department and the Religious Education Project Team, as well as an interview with Malcolm McArthur, one of the most influential figures in the controversy.

Findings

Following the collapse of religious instruction from 1968–1972, the Minister of Education quickly passed legislation regarding a new course of religious education. A major controversy subsequently broke out over the appropriateness and design of a new programme of religious education. Educators attempted to design an educationally sound programme of RE that would avoid the problem of indoctrination. Ultimately, a new programme was created that satisfied neither proponents nor opponents of religion in state schools, and General Religious Teaching gradually faded from South Australian classrooms by 1980.

Originality/value

The article engages with broader debates on the nature of secularity in Australian history. In particular, it complicates the political-institutional approach developed by Damon Mayrl by stressing the agency and significance of elite educational and religious actors in the creation of new secular settlements. It also provides a useful addition to an older South Australian historiography by utilising newly available sources on the topic.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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