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The Economic Decoding of Religious Dogmas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-536-8

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Article

Meike Rombach, Nicole Widmar, Elizabeth Byrd and Vera Bitsch

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights for flower retailers, horticultural practitioners and marketing managers into the prioritisation of cut flower attributes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights for flower retailers, horticultural practitioners and marketing managers into the prioritisation of cut flower attributes by German residents.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a best–worst scaling approach, this analysis identified the relative ranking of importance amongst product attributes relevant to German consumers when buying fresh cut flowers. A latent class analysis determined four flower consumer segments for further study. The study builds on a sample of 978 consumers and is consistent with the most recent German census in terms of age, gender, income and federal state.

Findings

The best-worst analysis showed that intrinsic flower attributes, in particular appearance, freshness and scent were found to be more important to German consumers than the extrinsic attributes studied, namely, price, country of origin and a certification indicating fair trade. The latent class analysis determined four consumer segments that desire either budget, luxury or ethical flowers or more information about flowers. For all identified consumer segments, appearance was the attribute of greatest importance. The segments that desired luxury or ethical flowers, as well as the segment that desires more information were interested in appearance, but also had relatively large shares of preferences dedicated to flower freshness guarantees. The preference for freshness guarantees in addition to appearance may be interpreted jointly as a desire for not only beautiful and aesthetically pleasing flowers, but for sustained beauty.

Originality/value

Internationally, the study fills a research gap by exploring consumer’s relative preference for cut flower attributes. In contrast to existing studies on consumer preferences for flowers in Germany, the present study builds on a sample that was targeted in terms of age, gender, net household income and federal state to the most recent German census.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Lester Coleman

This paper aims to identify the preferences towards sex education and information from a religiously diverse sample of young people. The research builds on growing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the preferences towards sex education and information from a religiously diverse sample of young people. The research builds on growing evidence towards religious affiliation having a strong influence on sexual attitudes and behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 3,007 young people aged 15‐18 attending schools in London, UK, completed a cross‐sectional survey. The questionnaire identified preferred sexual health “topics”, preferences for where they would like to receive this education and who they thought would be the ideal person to deliver the information.

Findings

The largest religious group was Christian (34 per cent), followed by Muslim (24 per cent), Hindu (21 per cent), “Don't believe” (15 per cent) and “Other” (7 per cent). There were a number of similarities across the practising religious groups such as preferences for more information on sexually transmitted infections and how to make sex more satisfying. The data also showed significant differences across the religious groups, in particular between Hindus and Muslims, and their preferences towards the ideal person to deliver sex education. Hindus were notable for showing a higher preference towards someone of similar age, and also reporting the least preference for someone of the same religion. By contrast, Muslims reported a higher preference for religious compatibility on the premise that such a person could “identify with” their own religious and cultural beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

Although derived from a sample that is not statistically representative of all young people, the findings demonstrate the potential and importance of being able to respond to the competing sex education preferences of religious groups. The forthcoming challenge is to research the ways in which this potential for sex education can be harnessed in a sensitive manner.

Originality/value

This paper is valuable in terms of establishing young people's preferences for information on sex and relationships, but less so in terms of identifying the types of sex education that are most beneficial. Indeed, it is likely that this paper will be of particular relevance to the “knowledge and understanding” element that is specified in this guidance.

Details

Health Education, vol. 108 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Rojanasak Chomvilailuk and Ken Butcher

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of three corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives on brand preference in the Thai banking sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of three corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives on brand preference in the Thai banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 × 2 between subject experimental design was used to test the hypotheses in a bank setting. Three CSR initiatives were tested against a predictor variable of perceived brand quality and moderated by age, CSR predisposition and cultural values. The CSR initiatives comprised commitment to CSR; type of CSR programme; and transparency. Written vignettes disguised as press releases by the bank were used as stimulus materials and a survey completed by 219 consumers in Thailand.

Findings

Overall, all three CSR initiatives had a modest but significant effect on brand preference. The level of influence varied according to age, CSR predisposition and cultural values. While older customers placed more emphasis on perceived brand quality overall it was also found that the type of CSR programme could significantly affect brand preference. In those groups high on the cultural value of individualism, commitment to CSR was found to be a strong contributor to brand preference. Similarly in those groups with a high power distance, brand preference was more influenced by CSR initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

While CSR initiatives make modest improvements to brand preference overall, more substantial impacts occur under situational conditions. Discovering and exploiting such situations is critical to any firm making substantial investments in CSR.

Practical implications

The differential impact of CSR initiatives on brand preference highlights the importance of carefully targeting stakeholders to optimise CSR investments. Communication strategies need to ensure that the appropriate message is designed for particular audiences.

Originality/value

A specific dependent variable of brand preference is used in this study, together with three specific CSR initiatives and three moderating influences. In addition, perceived brand quality is utilised as a benchmark variable to test the strength of CSR initiatives.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

Aashish Garg, Ran Singh Dhaliwal and Sanjay Gupta

From the last few decades, environmental issues have become a global concern. Consumption activities are given much attention in the marketing literature, whenever the…

Abstract

Purpose

From the last few decades, environmental issues have become a global concern. Consumption activities are given much attention in the marketing literature, whenever the question about protecting the environment arises. The responsibility of the consumer toward the environment is a major concern and the purpose of this study is to prioritize factors responsible for determining environmental responsibility among young consumers. This research will provide valuable insights to the marketers in targeting those particular areas which according to young consumers are highly ranked/prioritized for being environmentally responsible.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, data were collected from 400 young consumers from Punjab and Chandigarh. Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (F-AHP) was applied to prioritize or rank the factors on the basis of significance for being environmentally responsible. The primary factors considered for further analysis were knowledge and awareness, attitude, green consumer value, emotional affinity toward nature, willingness to act and environment-related past behavior.

Findings

Results of the study depicted knowledge and awareness as the highest-ranked and prioritized factor for young consumers to become environmentally responsible, while environment-related past behavior emerged as the least important factor for consumers' environmental responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from the young consumers of Punjab and Chandigarh only and only a few factors of consumers' environmental responsibility were considered for further analysis which depicts the limitation of the study.

Practical implications

The research study is highly useful for the government and the business firms to target the highly prioritized factors of environmental responsibility which will promote green consumption practices and behavior among young consumers.

Originality/value

Previous researches have explored the factors of environmental responsibility and modeled their relationships. However, the present study has employed the multi-criteria decision-making technique to provide valuable insights for marketers, academicians and practitioners about the drivers of consumers' environmental responsibility which adds value to the existing knowledge base.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Shireen Kanji and Sandra Hupka-Brunner

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how and whether young women’s strong and early preference for having children relates to the degree of occupational segregation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how and whether young women’s strong and early preference for having children relates to the degree of occupational segregation of the careers they envisage for themselves and the careers they actually enter by the time they reach age 23.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on theories predicting that young women act to replicate gendered social stereotypes in their career choice and to anticipate careers they perceive to be reconcilable with future motherhood, the authors conduct quantitative analyses using panel data from the Transitions from Education to Employment Survey, a longitudinal survey of young people in Switzerland. OLS regression analyses how expressing a strong desire to have children at age 16 impacts: the proportion of women in the career engaged in at age 23 and the career anticipated age 16, relative to women not expressing this strong preference. Logistic regression examines whether selection into wanting children could be held responsible for the results. Finally the authors explore how initial expectations and later outcomes relate to each other.

Findings

Women who express a strong interest in having children (Kinderwunsch) at age 16 anticipate and enter occupations with a substantially higher proportion of women. Differences in objective labour-market characteristics, such as academic attainment, ability and psychosocial factors, namely self-efficacy, are not related to having a strong desire for children at an early age. Family factors have multifaceted effects.

Research limitations/implications

This research uses data from a cohort who were age 16 in 2000. The rapidly changing social context of Switzerland necessitates updating this analysis at regular intervals across cohorts.

Practical implications

Discussion is required to expand young women’s understandings of the implications of different career choices and to broaden the range of options that they consider and to which employers provide access.

Social implications

Wanting to have children is one of the factors that fuels occupational gender segregation. Although women might envisage that more gender-segregated occupations would allow them to combine work and family life, this may not be the case in reality.

Originality/value

This paper explores the important but previously under-explored relationship between early fertility preferences and occupational entry for women.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part

Catherine Thomas

This paper shows that consumer preference heterogeneity affects whether multinational firms serve local markets via imports or local production. Firms are least likely to…

Abstract

This paper shows that consumer preference heterogeneity affects whether multinational firms serve local markets via imports or local production. Firms are least likely to choose local production over imports for product varieties that have relatively inelastic demand because transport costs have a smaller impact on the firm’s local profits for these products. The results suggest that there is complementarity between centralized production, with local market access via imports, and strategies that maintain low price elasticities at the brand level, such as advertising and within-brand product proliferation. A partial equilibrium study of the laundry detergent industry in Western Europe illustrates how firms and consumers interact at different levels of transport costs and reveals the product varieties that are most and least likely to be manufactured locally when transport costs are high.

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Geography, Location, and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-276-3

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Article

Mariola Palazon and Elena Delgado-Ballester

This study aims to analyse what type of premium, hedonic or utilitarian, is preferred in a promotional context. Additionally, it seeks to examine the role of affective and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse what type of premium, hedonic or utilitarian, is preferred in a promotional context. Additionally, it seeks to examine the role of affective and cognitive reactions in decision processes where utilitarian and hedonic premiums are involved.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted. A single factor within-subjects design was employed, with the nature of the premium (hedonic/utilitarian) as the treatment factor. Respondents were asked to make their choice between two promotional offers. Affective and cognitive reactions were measured. Regression analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized effects.

Findings

The results show that hedonic premiums are preferable to utilitarian ones in a promotional context, other characteristics of the premium (e.g. premium attractiveness) being equal. The findings also identify that a preference for the hedonic/utilitarian premium is more likely to emerge when affective/cognitive reactions are incited, and indicate that the nature of the preferred premium determines the mediating effect of cognitive reactions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only focuses on the hedonic/utilitarian nature of the premium. However, premiums come in very different forms and several characteristics – such as a premium with a relatively low price, the reception delay of the premium, and the perceived fit between the product and the premium – may reverse the relative preference for hedonic premiums.

Practical implications

The hedonic vs utilitarian nature of the premium should be considered when planning premium promotion. It appears that the use of more hedonic premiums increases the effectiveness of promotional actions alongside other variables such as premium attractiveness, the promotional benefit level or the product-premium fit. Furthermore, the type of premium offered influences the role of affective and cognitive reactions aroused during shopping. Thus, the nature of the premium may influence the reactions of consumers when participating in promotional actions.

Originality/value

The research extends the factors that may explain the effectiveness of premium promotions, since few studies to date have focused on the hedonic or utilitarian nature of premiums.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part

Alan L. Gustman and Thomas L. Steinmeier

This paper advances the specification and estimation of econometric models of retirement and saving in two earner families. The complications introduced by the interaction…

Abstract

This paper advances the specification and estimation of econometric models of retirement and saving in two earner families. The complications introduced by the interaction of retirement decisions by husbands and wives have led researchers to adopt a number of simplifications. Our analysis relaxes these restrictions. The model includes three labor market states, full-time work, partial retirement, and full retirement; reverse flows from states of lesser to greater work; an extended choice set created when spouses make independent retirement decisions; heterogeneity in time preference; varying taste parameters for full-time and part-time work; and the possibility of changes in preferences after retirement.

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Factors Affecting Worker Well-being: The Impact of Change in the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-150-3

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Article

Jiaqin Yang and Huei Lee

Presents an AHP (analytical hierarchy process) decision model for facility location selection from the view of organizations which contemplate locations of a new facility…

Abstract

Presents an AHP (analytical hierarchy process) decision model for facility location selection from the view of organizations which contemplate locations of a new facility or a relocation of existing facilities. The AHP model provides a framework to assist managers in analysing various location factors, evaluating location site alternatives, and making final location selections. The primary principle of the AHP model is to match decision‐makers’ preferences with location site characteristics. The model requires that a number of potential sites have been proposed. Alternatives are then evaluated and compared under both quantitative and qualitative factors to allow managers to incorporate managerial experiences and judgement in the solution process. Uses an example problem to illustrate the solution process. Addresses managerial implications for future research.

Details

Facilities, vol. 15 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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