Search results

1 – 10 of over 105000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Christos Sigalas and Vassilis M. Papadakis

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationship patterns between competitive advantage and superior performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationship patterns between competitive advantage and superior performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically investigates the aforementioned relationship patterns using a cross-sectional, self-administered survey methodology.

Findings

The results indicate that there are four relationship patterns between competitive advantage and superior performance. In addition, this study provides empirical evidence of the reasons, underpinning the relationship pattern of competitive advantage without superior performance as well as the relationship pattern of superior performance without competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to our knowledge that competitive advantage is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for superior performance.

Practical implications

In finding support that there can be cases of underperformance despite competitive advantage and superior performance despite the absence of competitive advantage, the study’s findings are useful to practicing managers involved in the strategic management process of their firms.

Originality/value

This study fills an important gap in the empirical research, by responding to the literature call to test the possible relationship patterns between competitive advantage and superior performance. In addition, this study formally introduces the relationship pattern of competitive advantage without superior performance, and the relationship pattern of superior performance without competitive advantage that until now were largely ignored by the existing literature in the field of strategic management.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Zhongjun Tang, Tingting Wang, Junfu Cui, Zhongya Han and Bo He

Because of short life cycle and fluctuating greatly in total sales volumes (TSV), it is difficult to accumulate enough sales data and mine an attribute set reflecting the…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of short life cycle and fluctuating greatly in total sales volumes (TSV), it is difficult to accumulate enough sales data and mine an attribute set reflecting the common needs of all consumers for a kind of experiential product with short life cycle (EPSLC). Methods for predicting TSV of long-life-cycle products may not be suitable for EPSLC. Furthermore, point prediction cannot obtain satisfactory prediction results because information available before production is inadequate. Thus, this paper aims at proposing and verifying a novel interval prediction method (IPM).

Design/methodology/approach

Because interval prediction may satisfy requirements of preproduction investment decision-making, interval prediction was adopted, and then the prediction difficult was converted into a classification problem. The classification was designed by comparing similarities in attribute relationship patterns between a new EPSLC and existing product groups. The product introduction may be written or obtained before production and thus was designed as primary source information. IPM was verified by using data of crime movies released in China from 2013 to 2017.

Findings

The IPM is valid, which uses product introduction as input, classifies existing products into three groups with different TSV intervals, mines attribute relationship patterns using content and association analyses and compares similarities in attribute relationship patterns – to predict TSV interval of a new EPSLC before production.

Originality/value

Different from other studies, the IPM uses product introduction to mine attribute relationship patterns and compares similarities in attribute relationship patterns to predict the interval values. It has a strong applicability in data content and structure and may realize rolling prediction.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Alex Bennet and David Bennet

The purpose of this article is to link the associative learning process of the human brain to the relationship and emergence of really significant ideas on the global horizon.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to link the associative learning process of the human brain to the relationship and emergence of really significant ideas on the global horizon.

Design/methodology/approach

First, learning is explored from the viewpoint of the brain/mind, with a focus on the creation of patterns and their relationships to our personal frames of reference. Second, the associations of three really significant ideas are explored, and a pattern of patterns is surfaced.

Findings

The paper finds that in concert with the functioning of the brain, significant ideas emerge in relationship with other ideas that have personal historical significance, i.e. external patterns from the environment are detected, recognized, made sense of and have meaning in relationship with our internal patterns of significance.

Originality/value

The paper creates an appreciation of the role of patterns in thinking and learning.

Details

VINE, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Li Xi‐can, Yu Tao, Wang Xiao, Yuan Zheng and Shang Xiao‐dong

The purpose of this paper is to establish the grey‐weighted relationship prediction pattern of the soil organic matter content spectral inversion under the uncertainties…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the grey‐weighted relationship prediction pattern of the soil organic matter content spectral inversion under the uncertainties between soil organic matter contents and spectral characteristics and the theory of grey system.

Design/methodology/approach

At first, according to grey‐weighted distance, a new grey relationship model is presented. Second, in order to make full use of the information of grey relationship sequences, the maximum grey relationship discrimination principle is improved and then the soil organic matter content spectral inversion pattern is put forward based on weighted grey recognition theory. A numeric example of Hengshan County in Shanxi Province is also computed in the last part of the paper.

Findings

The results are convincing: not only that soil organic matter content spectral inversion pattern based on the weighted grey recognition theory is valid, but also the model's prediction accuracy is higher; the sample's average prediction accuracy is 94.917 per cent.

Practical implications

The method exposed in the paper can be used at soil organic matter content hyper‐spectral inversion and even for other similar forecast problems.

Originality/value

The paper succeeds in realising both prediction pattern and application of soil organic matter content hyper‐spectral inversion by using the newest developed theories: weighted grey recognition theory.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Ed G.J. Vosselman and Jeltje van der Meer‐Kooistra

To develop a model in which alternative patterns of management control are confronted with situational and institutional features in the context of transactional…

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a model in which alternative patterns of management control are confronted with situational and institutional features in the context of transactional relationships. The model could be of use to managers in making rational decisions regarding the boundaries of the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is developed by drawing on transaction cost economics extended with systems theoretical notions on trust.

Findings

Three patterns of management control are identified: a market pattern, a bureaucratic pattern and a trust pattern. Furthermore, the transactional and institutional factors that determine the choice of a control pattern or elements therein are identified and confronted with the three management control patterns.

Research limitations/implications

An extended transaction cost economics approach is rather static of nature and, therefore, could be criticized for its lack of attention to processes of gradual development. In practice, adoption and design of management control structures are only part of the story; there also is gradual development or evolution in management control. However, the implications of the model are restricted to rational decision making regarding the adoption/design of management control patterns.

Originality/value

The paper provides a relevant and usable model for the adoption and design of management control patterns.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Helena Syna Desivilya and Dafna Eizen

The current study focused on intra‐group conflict by attempting to elucidate individual and situational factors underlying choices along two dimensions of conflict…

Abstract

The current study focused on intra‐group conflict by attempting to elucidate individual and situational factors underlying choices along two dimensions of conflict management patterns: engagement versus avoidance and constructive versus destructive. In the study, the role of two types of self‐efficacy (global and social) among group members was investigated, as was the sense of group identification in team dispute resolution preferences modes. Sixty‐seven members of volunteer community service communes in the Israeli Scouting youth movement, 48 females and 19 males, representing 13 intact teams, participated in the study. Self‐report structured questionnaires (previously used and adapted for this study) served as research instruments. Both global self‐efficacy and group identification independently predicted the conflict engagement‐destructive pattern of domination. Social self‐efficacy served as the sole predictor of the preference to manage intra‐team conflict by means of integrating—the engagement‐constructive mode. In contrast, the choice of compromising was also fostered by the joint contribution of social self‐efficacy and group‐identification, beyond the direct effect of social self‐efficacy. The study corroborates the assumption that conflict management patterns within an intact team are related to dispositional variables on the individual level, i.e., global and social self‐efficacy, and to the team‐related variable of group identification.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Arno Nuijten, Mark Keil, Gerrit Sarens and Mark van Twist

Information system projects often go awry and when they do internal auditors are often in a position to bring the problems to management’s attention. However, managers are…

Abstract

Purpose

Information system projects often go awry and when they do internal auditors are often in a position to bring the problems to management’s attention. However, managers are not always receptive to risk warnings, even when internal auditors who are role prescribed to carry out this function deliver such warnings. This phenomenon is known as the deaf effect. This paper aims to examine the actions that internal auditors take to resolve the deaf effect and how these actions affect the auditor–manager relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a multiple case study approach, the authors conducted in-depth interviews with auditors and examined ten cases of the deaf effect from the auditor’s perspective.

Findings

The findings revealed three categories of actions that auditors took in response to the deaf effect and how these actions immediately affected the auditor–manager relationship. Further, by analyzing the subsequent sequence of actions taken by the auditor in each case, the authors identified three distinct patterns that capture the dynamics of the auditor–manager relationship over time until the deaf effect was, ultimately, resolved.

Originality/value

Several practitioner studies have shown that internal auditors and managers struggle to build effective relationships, even under the most favorable circumstances and the authors suggest that deaf effect situations are likely to pose an even greater challenge to the auditor–manager relationship. The study contributes to the discourse on internal audit effectiveness in several ways. First, the authors identified three categories of actions that internal auditors took in response to the deaf effect. The authors found that two of these categories of action are related to the two distinct roles that internal auditors can play (inspector or consultant). Second, the authors examined how these categories of actions played out over time, influencing the auditor–manager relationship dynamics.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Melanie Preuss and Per van der Wijst

The purpose of this study is to analyze whether negotiators stick to one single negotiation style or whether their styles vary during the negotiation process. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze whether negotiators stick to one single negotiation style or whether their styles vary during the negotiation process. The paper seeks to identify different combinations of phase-specific negotiation styles and investigates the relationship between these combinations and negotiation performance and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a large online negotiation simulation that allows a phase-specific analysis of negotiation styles via an elaborate coding scheme.

Findings

The findings reveal that negotiators generally do not limit themselves to a single negotiation style. Instead, they vary their style in the course of different negotiation phases. The authors distinguish between five distinct phase-specific negotiation style patterns that differ with regard to their impact on negotiation performance but not negotiation satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study demonstrates that a phase-specific analysis of negotiation styles allows deeper insights into a negotiator’s style behavior. For future studies, the authors recommend taking a phase-specific view when analyzing negotiation styles.

Practical implications

Negotiation practitioners get to know different phase-specific negotiation style patterns and get insights into which pattern is the most promising for negotiation performance. As a result, they can acquire this phase-specific negotiation style pattern to enhance their performance.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to existing negotiation style literature, because it is the first to analyze negotiation styles from a phase-specific point of view.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Frieder R Lang

Relationships between adult children and their aging parents are challenged when parents need help or care. As a consequence, adult children often experience a transition…

Abstract

Relationships between adult children and their aging parents are challenged when parents need help or care. As a consequence, adult children often experience a transition in their filial role as older parents experience functional losses and the children have to reorganize and restructure their relationship with them (Lang & Schütze, 2002). This filial task competes with other demands of midlife (such as family and career demands). As a consequence, the filial role in midlife may be associated with contradictory experiences in the relationship with one’s parents, typically entailing a high potential for ambivalence.

Details

Intergenerational Ambivalences: New Perspectives on Parent-Child Relations in Later Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-801-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

1 – 10 of over 105000