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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Jerika C. Norona and Spencer B. Olmstead

Romantic dissolution is a common experience throughout the life course, particularly during emerging adulthood (ages 18–29). The purpose of this review was to summarize…

Abstract

Romantic dissolution is a common experience throughout the life course, particularly during emerging adulthood (ages 18–29). The purpose of this review was to summarize and critique theoretical approaches and empirical findings of the aftermath of dating relationship dissolution.

Article searches were conducted within PsycINFO. We utilized terms related to romantic relationship dissolution (i.e., breakup, romantic breakup, relationship termination, relationship dissolution, romantic dissolution, romantic termination, post-dissolution) in a search for key words. We narrowed the results further by limiting the search to include participants between the ages of 18 and 29.

Experiencing romantic dissolution can result in both positive and negative emotional reactions and behaviors, including personal growth and self-expansion as well as experiencing physical and emotional abuse from ex-partners. Furthermore, former romantic partners commonly form other types of friendships and casual sexual relationships after the termination of committed romantic relationships. Many theoretical frameworks are used to guide these investigations, and some articles lack a theoretical framework.

Developmental Systems Theory might be a theoretical framework that best shapes our investigations of romantic dissolution in dating relationships that occur in emerging adulthood.

Relationship education programs would be enhanced by discussing the developmental needs that are important for young people and the ways in which their romantic experiences can or cannot meet those needs. In addition to learning about how to have healthy romantic relationships, young people can also benefit from learning how to identify when romantic relationships should end, and how to end them successfully.

Details

Intimate Relationships and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-610-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Susan Freeman and Emma Browne

Identifies the communication strategies available to companies when dissolving cross‐cultural inter‐organisational relationships to achieve effective (cooperative…

Abstract

Identifies the communication strategies available to companies when dissolving cross‐cultural inter‐organisational relationships to achieve effective (cooperative) outcomes. First, addresses the importance of communication dissolution, and proposes a typology of available communication strategies. Second, emphasises the importance of understanding cultural diversity in business relationships in general and dissolution in particular. Third, proposes two related theoretical frameworks. The first addresses different conflict management styles that bridge the gap between dissolution communication strategies and the cultural context in which the actors are embedded. The second is a theoretical model for analysing dissolution process in a cross‐cultural business relationship context. Proposes the independent variable, culture, as providing a frame of reference by which meaning and intent are assigned by the foreign company to the communications of the terminating company (disengager), thus affecting the choice of dissolution strategy.

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Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Andrew D. Pressey and Xin Xuan Qiu

This paper aims to examine the characteristics of buyer‐supplier relationship dissolution in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the characteristics of buyer‐supplier relationship dissolution in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of nine in‐depth interviews of Chinese managers of dissolved long‐term business relationships.

Findings

The paper finds that it is common in China for relationships to have a transferable “energy” after the dissolution of a relationship due to the guanxi that exists between individuals prior to dissolution. It is also common for dysfunctional relationships to “fade away” so as not to lose “face” for a business partner or damage any guanxi developed by abruptly ending relations. Additionally, a characteristic of dissolution in China is the involvement of a third‐party (an individual who introduced subsequent business partners), who would often then play an active role in the dissolution of the relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on data from managers in private enterprises with no examination of state‐owned enterprises.

Practical implications

The paper offers guidelines for the characteristics of relationship dissolution in China that make it distinctive, particularly in comparison to dissolution in a Western context.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of relationship dissolution by examining buyer‐supplier relationship dissolution in China. The findings of this study suggest that much can be gained by examining predominantly western views of relationship functionality and dysfunctionality in different cultural contexts.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Kimmo Alajoutsijärvi, Kristian Möller and Jaana Tähtinen

Interorganisational buyer‐seller relationships have been primarily studied from the perspective of relationship development and the benefits accrued from relationships

Abstract

Interorganisational buyer‐seller relationships have been primarily studied from the perspective of relationship development and the benefits accrued from relationships. There is a lack of research concerning problems with relationships and relationship dissolution. The dissolution of a business relationship can be either desirable, freeing badly deployed resources, as indicated by the customer portfolio approach, or harmful, involving costly legal disputes and the loss of company reputation. By employing a theory‐driven case study approach we examine the exit strategies available for the disengager in dissolving interorganisational buyer‐seller relationships. We show that the quality of dissolution is affected by the disengager’s choice of exit strategy. Managerial suggestions are provided for achieving “beautiful exits”, i.e. such communication strategies which minimise damages of the dissolution to the disengager, the other party, and the connected business network.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Mary Ann Hocutt

A relationship dissolution model is developed that depicts some of the key antecedents of relationship commitment as revealed in the context of the dissolution of a…

Abstract

A relationship dissolution model is developed that depicts some of the key antecedents of relationship commitment as revealed in the context of the dissolution of a buyer‐seller relationship. Despite the importance of the dissolution of marketing relationships, there has been little research on this topic. The level of commitment determines intentions to remain in the relationship. However, it is difficult to measure true commitment in a relationship until that relationship ends. In addition to adding to our knowledge about the dissolution of marketing relationships, this paper will also provide a new conceptual representation of the relationship commitment construct.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Ioanna‐Maria Gedeon, Andrew Fearne and Nigel Poole

This paper aims to explore the role that inter‐personal relationships play in promoting or hindering the dissolution of business relationships operating in the UK food industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role that inter‐personal relationships play in promoting or hindering the dissolution of business relationships operating in the UK food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study methodology was used to explore the dissolution of 11 business relationships and the role of inter‐personal relationships therein.

Findings

The findings demonstrate the critical role of personal relationships in the dissolution processing, acting as a catalyst, a precipitator and an extenuating factor in the dissolution process.

Research limitations/implications

The case studies draw exclusively on the experiences and perceptions of suppliers to uncover the dynamics of dissolved business relationships. However, this is not surprising, given the sensitive nature of the subject. Moreover, the two‐stage methodology used for identifying case study candidates should prove beneficial to other researchers in this area.

Practical implications

The case study findings illustrate that important though they are, personal relationships are a means to an end not an end in themselves. Failure to use close personal relationships to deliver commercial benefits leaves the supplier vulnerable.

Originality/value

This is one of very few papers to provide empirical evidence of the dissolution process in business relationships, using a novel case study methodology that may prove useful for other researchers working in this under‐researched area.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Sabrina Helm, Ludger Rolfes and Bernd Günter

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate the supplier's view on supplier‐initiated relationship dissolution due to lack of customer profitability.

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate the supplier's view on supplier‐initiated relationship dissolution due to lack of customer profitability. Design/methodology/approach – The research is focused on inter‐organisational buyer‐seller relationships. An exploratory study in the German mechanical engineering industry was conducted to provide insights into the usage of customer valuation techniques and the preponderance of unprofitable customer relationships, and to identify various ways of managing unprofitable customer relationships by means of cluster analysis. Findings – The study shows that many companies in the industry lack knowledge and use of customer valuation techniques. Three clusters of supplying firms are identified that differ in their willingness to end unprofitable customer relationships. Research limitations/implications – Provides an exploratory study into a neglected aspect of relationship marketing characterised by a low response rate. The sample contained companies from one major German industry, limiting the applicability of its findings. The main implications are that unprofitable customer relationships are a common feature of industrial markets, which merits further investigation. Respondents were shown to have a range of different views and approaches to such relationships. Research on customer valuation needs to focus on the implementation barriers of valuation methods. Practical implications – Study results stress the importance of developing and implementing customer valuation methods, the relevance of unprofitable relationships, and suppliers' decision making concerning such precarious relationships. It is a useful source of information and impartial advice for managers involved with customer management. Originality/value – The paper leads to a more thorough understanding of relationship marketing and provides empirical data on a neglected field of marketing research, as prior work did not consider the supplier's view on dissolution management in detail.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

David J. Good and Kenneth R. Evans

The literature is rich with examples that stress the importance of marketers having long‐term customer relationships. Yet, the reality is that while relational attachments…

Abstract

The literature is rich with examples that stress the importance of marketers having long‐term customer relationships. Yet, the reality is that while relational attachments can foster benefits, there are many occasions when marketers seek, or are forced, to disband or change the nature of customer relationships. Interestingly however, despite the obviousness of this circumstance, this remains an unexamined strategic condition. In a unique investigation, this article explores the strategic opportunities and conditions that emanate from “relational unrest” in the business‐to‐business marketplace. Consequently, this article notes how sellers can benefit from understanding how to properly manage relational unrest. To address this issue, a strategic framework is proposed, which concludes that when sellers experience relational difficulties, strategic options with positive outcomes and related managerial implications can be associated with this condition.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 28 March 2006

Inger Beate Pettersen and Aksel I. Rokkan

Research within the inter-organizational field has until recently focused on the formation and maintenance of business relationships, while less research has been directed…

Abstract

Research within the inter-organizational field has until recently focused on the formation and maintenance of business relationships, while less research has been directed toward the study of relationship ending. Lately, however, research on dissolution and related constructs, such as exit intention and switching has emerged (Halinen, Havila, & Tähtinen, 1999a; Prim-Allaz, 2000; Tähtinen & Havila, 2004; Vaaland, Haugland, & Purchase, 2004). Some literature focuses on the reasons and antecedents to relationship dissolution (Ping, 1999; Haugland, 1999; Wathne, Biong, & Heide, 2000), while other research investigates the process and consequences of relationship dissolution (Grønhaug, Henjesand, & Koveland, 1999; Giller & Matear, 2001; Alajoutsijärvi, Möller, & Tähtinen, 2000). Yet, few studies have investigated relationship dissolution in cross -national dyads. Specifically, the current research examines how supplier reps’ cultural knowledge, cultural adaptation and communication affect buyer tolerance of conflict in cross-national business relationships. The construct tolerance of conflict refers to the intention to discontinue the business relationship with the current partner given conflict situations. This construct is therefore conceptually close to exit intention; a construct frequently used in relationship dissolution studies (e.g. Ping, 1993,1995; Halinen & Tähtinen, 1999b).

Details

Relationship Between Exporters and Their Foreign Sales and Marketing Intermediaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-397-6

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Roberto Mora Cortez and Wesley J. Johnston

This paper aims to explore the possible scenarios after a failed reverse auction to continue a current buyer–seller relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the possible scenarios after a failed reverse auction to continue a current buyer–seller relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a further understanding of reverse auctions through the examination of a longitudinal case study in the mining industry based on grounded theory.

Findings

The study indicates that losing a reverse auction is not a death sentence for the current supplier. Four factors influence the potential scenarios: buyer factors, supplier factors, buyer–seller factors and contextual factors. If the overall evaluation favors the current buyer–seller relationship, the supplier can continue the business interaction by full renegotiation or discrete step-by-step reconsideration. Conversely, the buyer–seller relationship would reach a state of dissolution.

Originality/value

This manuscript contributes to the understanding of reverse auction, an under-researched theme in organizational buying behavior theory. This paper is the first attempt to link buyer–seller relationship dissolution and reverse auctions. The authors suggest that more academic endeavors are needed to study online reverse auctions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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