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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2017

Nayanthara De Silva, R.P.N.P. Weerasinghe, H.W.N. Madhusanka and Mohan Kumaraswamy

A case is made for developing “Relationally Integrated Value Networks for Total Facilities Management” (RIVANS-TFM) by synergistically connecting significant stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

A case is made for developing “Relationally Integrated Value Networks for Total Facilities Management” (RIVANS-TFM) by synergistically connecting significant stakeholders of the project management (PM) and facilities management (FM) phases to deliver substantially better value for the end users of built infrastructure. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey enabled identification of typically significant stakeholders in the PM and FM phases. In total, 14 key stakeholders were identified through t-test analysis in this Sri Lankan study. Semi-structured interviews unveiled relationships among the aforementioned stakeholders and the findings were used to develop the “required” RIVANS-TFM, as well as the “existing” RIVANS-TFM, using the UCINET social network analysis software package. Social network theory of relationships was applied to analyze the networks in terms of “Structural Holes” or missing links and “Brokerage Potentials.”

Findings

Structural holes analysis highlighted the existing setup to be more vulnerable to missing links than the “required”/targeted setup. Furthermore, brokerage potentials analysis revealed that owners, project managers, facility managers, maintenance engineers, main contractors, designers, principal consultants, and other specialist consultants can act as “brokers” to bridge the gaps or minimize structural holes, thereby uplifting and reinforcing the existing network to deliver better performance and value in TFM.

Originality/value

By revealing existing and required levels of integration of each stakeholder in RIVANS-TFM, clients are provided a great opportunity to identify the stakeholders who should be engaged more, or less – in order to best achieve clients’ long-term aspirations and project objectives. Furthermore, the findings also indicate appropriate levels of stakeholder relationships to target, in order to maintain efficient flows of information, material and services in the supply chains while enhancing TFM life-cycle values.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Aaron M. Anvuur, Mohan M. Kumaraswamy and Gangadhar Mahesh

Advocacy for the re‐integration of highly differentiated, at times fragmented, construction project “teams” and supply chains has increased in this era of network

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2069

Abstract

Purpose

Advocacy for the re‐integration of highly differentiated, at times fragmented, construction project “teams” and supply chains has increased in this era of network competition, yet industry targets remain elusive. This paper aims to report on findings of research focused on the development and validation of the building‐blocks for relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) that seeks to redress this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Complementary theoretical streams are identified through an extensive literature review, and are used to shape and inform discussions of the key RIVANS themes of value objectives, network management, learning, and maturity. Four moderated focus groups hosted in each of two workshops in Hong Kong, are used to validate these themes. Each workshop typically comprised thematic focus group sessions in between introductory presentations and a plenary consolidation session.

Findings

The findings indicate strong support for the comprehensive coverage, appropriateness and practical relevance of the key RIVANS themes. The findings also suggest that public sector clients and procuring agents need empowerment to provide adequate leadership and create the environmental contexts required in RIVANS.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research approach and context may temper the generalisability of the findings reported in this paper. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed RIVANS concepts in other contexts.

Practical implications

Implications for the development of basic implementation templates for RIVANS are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper responds to a clearly identified need for integrative value‐based models of competitiveness in construction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Mohan M. Kumaraswamy, Aaron M. Anvuur and Hedley J. Smyth

The paper seeks to consider relational integration across a network of organisational members. To this end, “relationally integrated value networks” (RIVANS) are…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to consider relational integration across a network of organisational members. To this end, “relationally integrated value networks” (RIVANS) are conceptualised to engage and empower network members towards well‐focused collaboration that adds value. The aim is to identify the routes towards achieving the desirable integration together with the desired “overall value” that includes the hitherto often neglected “whole life” and end‐user priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies of enlightened team working are used to examine the power of RIVANS to add value. Deliberations at two subsequent workshops identified the potential for furthering the RIVANS approach and operationalising the value propositions.

Findings

Relational integration in networks adds considerable value to projects. Cross‐fertilisation benefits accrue when RIVANS members also participate in other value networks that also include other facilities managers.

Research limitations/implications

Relational agendas have grown steadily over the last 15 years. There is scope for further development for benefits of clients and the supply network. This is despite an apparent retreat from a focus on differentiation to a re‐emerging cost focus.

Practical implications

Each network can benefit from healthy inputs from, and benchmarking against, other networks. The strengths of each network will be enhanced by the steady development of each of its members, mutual feedback and collaborative learning opportunities.

Originality/value

The need for, and potential impact of RIVANS are heightened in the present major economic downturn. Relationally integrated networks can be more resilient, while adding value and building market share through collaborative efficiencies throughout the life cycles of built assets.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Nayanthara De Silva, Nilmini Weerasinghe, H.W.N. Madhusanka and Mohan Kumaraswamy

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers for setting up relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) for total facilities management (TFM) as a holistic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify enablers for setting up relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) for total facilities management (TFM) as a holistic approach to bridge the Project Management (PM) phase to the facilities management (FM) phase, aiming for better service delivery while optimizing the life-cycle cost. These enablers are proposed as required driving forces for the industry to bridge current gaps through RIVANS for TFM so as to improve the value of the facility and deliver better value to its stakeholders over its life span.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review elicited 11 typical better values that could be achieved by suitably linking the PM and FM supply chains in general. While these were tested in parallel research exercises in Hong Kong, the UK and Singapore, this paper reports on the specific findings from Sri Lanka, where a Web-based questionnaire survey was conducted to identify potential better values for proposed relational networks (including the clients, consultants, contractors and suppliers in the supply chain). Better values were then clustered under principal domains/components using factor analysis to establish synergetic enablers.

Findings

In total, 11 significant better values for TFM were identified and four enablers were extracted as building long-term integrated networks, establishing a common resource pool linking PM and FM, enhancing sustainability of TFM and developing a similar protocol between PM and FM.

Originality/value

The study carried out in this paper contributes to knowledge by identifying drivers to bridge the gap between PM and FM to best achieve clients’ long-term aspirations through a holistic life-cycle approach. Furthermore, all stakeholders in TFM can revisit their practices to establish and strengthen the identified enablers.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Hedley Smyth, Aaron M. Anvuur and Illona Kusuma

Examine the extent of integration in delivering value from design and construction (DC) activities for total asset management (TAM) and operations post-completion. DC and…

Abstract

Purpose

Examine the extent of integration in delivering value from design and construction (DC) activities for total asset management (TAM) and operations post-completion. DC and operations and management (OM) are both addressed. The problem owners are those in roles and organisations responsible for integrating DC with OM. The purpose of this paper is to show the extent of integration between actors along the project lifecycle. Relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) provide the conceptual lens for the analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method approach was used. A questionnaire survey and semi-structured interviews were employed.

Findings

There is a lack of engagement between DC and OM. The trend is moving counter to integration. BIM is not found to be a technical solution.

Research limitations/implications

The mixed method helps extend the RIVANS perspective. Further research to understand and support integration is needed, especially qualitative research to provide greater granular understanding.

Practical implications

The identified trend away from integration poses management challenges in delivery and for sustainability in use. Supply chains engage specialists, yet internal and inter-organisational collaboration require management attention to value creation. This includes the DC-OM interface. Both sides can benefit from increased engagement.

Social implications

Infrastructure and property provision will continue to fall short of user and environmental functionality without improved integration.

Originality/value

A contribution to the project and asset management interface is made, showing low integration, disengaged asset management. BIM is unable to plug the gaps. The RIVANS analytical lens provides a perspective for improvement.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Kelwin K.W. Wong, Mohan Kumaraswamy, Gangadhar Mahesh and Florence Y.Y. Ling

This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management…

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1475

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management (AM) for total asset management (TAM). The specific objectives are to test the RIVANS for TAM concept postulated by Kumaraswamy (2011) and Kumaraswamy et al. (2012); discover ways to enable PM and AM teams to work in an integrated manner; and recommend strategies and operational measures to promote greater team integration in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based in Hong Kong with parallel studies in the UK, Singapore and Sri Lanka. Through a comprehensive questionnaire, a case study on an organization engaged in both design and construction and operations and maintenance (O&M) works, interviews and hosting a workshop (all conducted with experienced industry practitioners and experts), a set of recommendations are derived to guide the industry toward greater team integration.

Findings

Early involvement of O&M staff is important for better anticipating obstacles and learning from past experiences, but PM and AM teams generally work independently with limited interaction. Priorities of the stakeholders are often different. Knowledge management is increasingly important, but knowledge sharing is not always a priority. The three focus areas in the set of recommendations developed from Hong Kong are: organizational/management structure, procurement strategies and operational mechanisms; fostering culture of team building and providing additional means of communication; and informal communication tools.

Originality/value

There has been little research into the communication, interaction and integration between PM and AM priorities and teams. However, increasing industry emphasis on sustainable buildings, end-user satisfaction and designing for maintainability dictates that PM and AM teams must work closer together, hence the imperative for mapping useful directions to be pursued.

Abstract

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Mohan Kumaraswamy

Downloads
304

Abstract

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Ronald McCaffer

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404

Abstract

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Florence Y.Y. Ling, Zhe Zhang and Wei Ting Wong

This research investigates the dominant personality traits of construction project managers (PMs) and how their personality influences their management styles.

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the dominant personality traits of construction project managers (PMs) and how their personality influences their management styles.

Design/methodology/approach

An industry-wide survey with 70 PMs was conducted in Singapore. The survey data were subjected to inferential statistical tests. In-depth interviews were conducted with four subject matter experts.

Findings

Majority of the sample PMs are male with age, education level and experience well spread. The dominant personality traits of PMs are found to be: high in Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and Openness and low in Neuroticism. PMs adopt “team leadership” style in which they place high emphasis on both the work that they need to complete and the people they lead. Their Agreeableness and Conscientiousness may improve over time.

Research limitations/implications

The correlations and regressions cannot prove causality.

Practical implications

It is discovered that PMs who have high conscientiousness and high openness personalities are more likely to be leaders who are concerned for both the people that they lead and production outcomes. The implication is that employers may wish to conduct personality tests at the time of hiring to ensure good job match.

Originality/value

This study is novel because it integrated two areas of knowledge – personality traits and management style. The regression analysis discovered that Openness and Conscientiousness traits may be used to predict PMs' management styles. This suggests that if personality tests are administered at hiring stage, the outcomes may be used to match potential hires to the jobs that they are being considered for.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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