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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Richard D. Cotton and Yan Shen

The purpose of this paper is to identify key developmental relationships for career‐spanning success and to examine relational models and support expectations associated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key developmental relationships for career‐spanning success and to examine relational models and support expectations associated with these relationships. The paper creates propositions associating developer‐protégé schema congruence and incongruence to relevant outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 employed qualitative coding of developers identified in 77 hall of famer induction speeches and Study 2 used a cross‐industry survey of 425 respondents to assess the relational model and support expectations associated with the seven most highly‐cited developer roles from Study 1.

Findings

Study 1 identified these highly‐cited developer roles as a CEO, manager, work teammate, friend, spouse, parent, and unmet hero/idol. Study 2 described the expected relational models associated with these roles and found significant differences in the relational model and support expectations associated across roles.

Research limitations/implications

While study 1 focused on a primarily male sample using retrospective data, it generalized and extended previous research on key developer roles for extraordinary career achievement. Based on the key findings from study 1, study 2 surveyed respondents regarding developer role expectations rather than expectations of particular developer‐protégé relationships.

Practical implications

These findings identify how and with whom protégés should consider initiating and fostering key developmental relationships to enhance their networks while broadening and deepening organizations' understanding of the importance of their members having a variety of organizational and non‐organizational developers.

Originality/value

These findings challenge the notion that developer‐protégé relationships fit a “one size fits all” reciprocal exchange motif as it is the first study to explore expectations associated with key developer relationships using relational models theory.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Yevgen Bogodistov and Anzhela Lizneva

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the employees’ identities shift in Ukraine based on the relational model theory. The paper concentrates on the role which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the employees’ identities shift in Ukraine based on the relational model theory. The paper concentrates on the role which culture and history play in the use of relational models in firms on different organizational levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested by multivariate analysis of variance and covariance tests with the data from 99 surveys of Ukrainian firms describing 219 intraorganizational relationships.

Findings

The results showed that culture and history play a significant role for the preference of a certain relational model. Position in the organization and gender influence the choice of the relational model.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of only Ukrainian employees restricts generalizability of the results. This study applies relational models theory in business domain and provides an alternative explanation of employees’ identities shift due to cultural differences and ideological past. Relational models are investigated on different organizational levels shedding light on models of relationships employees prefer in different settings.

Practical implications

Managers working in international settings should pay more attention to patterns of relationships in the target country since they are not freely chosen but partially predestined by the cultural background and the historical and ideological past. Relationships in firms are path dependent, whereby employees inherit models from their peers to apply them to their subordinates. Ukrainian female and male employees have different preferences concerning relational models.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it applies an anthropological theory to relationships on different organizational levels and tests it in a business domain of a country in an ideological transition.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Velitchka D. Kaltcheva, Anthony Patino, Michael V. Laric, Dennis A. Pitta and Nicholas Imparato

The authors apply Alan P. Fiske's relational models framework to customers' engagement with service firms – specifically, they propose that customers who hold different…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors apply Alan P. Fiske's relational models framework to customers' engagement with service firms – specifically, they propose that customers who hold different relational models for the service firm are likely to engage with the firm in dissimilar ways, thus generating different types of customer engagement value for the firm. Fiske's relational models framework is eminently suitable for studying customer-service firm engagement because it is widely adopted in the social sciences as a rigorously developed framework for conceptualizing social interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

The article bridges Fiske's relational models framework and Kumar et al.'s customer engagement value framework, and conceptually demonstrates that customers employing different relational models for the service firm are likely to generate different types of customer engagement value for the firm.

Findings

The article demonstrates conceptually that customers' relational models, schemata, and scripts influence how consumers engage with the firm and the type of customer engagement value accruing to the firm.

Research limitations/implications

This research has implications for service firms' relationship strategies. First, service marketers can determine the desired customer engagement value(s) and then craft their customer relationship strategy so that it maximizes those engagement value(s). The article suggests relationship strategies that service firms may implement for encouraging customers to adopt different relational models.

Originality/value

No research has bridged relational models theories and customer engagement value theories.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Annmarie Ryan and Keith Blois

The purpose of this paper is to address a particular tension in arts marketing, that is, the ongoing search for balance between achieving artistic excellence and financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a particular tension in arts marketing, that is, the ongoing search for balance between achieving artistic excellence and financial stability, while keeping work accessible and satisfying a range of stakeholders, public and private.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Fiske’s (1992) relational models theory as a framework to categorize different modes of exchange between a sponsor and an arts organization, this paper focusses on the varied nature of interactions between parties.

Findings

Drawing on data from a longitudinal case study, the authors evaluate the many opportunities and risks associated with sponsorship arrangements and to explore how these become manifest and potentially resolved within the relational structure over time. Moreover, the authors examine how an arts marketer can employ particular relational models of exchange to mitigate the risks of another model which is operational within the sponsorship.

Research limitations/implications

The aim of this paper is to consider the variety of exchange ongoing in long-term sponsorship arrangements, and in using Fiske’s RM theory, to identify the risk and opportunities associated with these exchanges. The case study examined here is, of course, idiosyncratic in terms of people, time and place. However, what is general, and what the authors wish to draw attention to, is how managers can employ different models of exchange to mitigate risks arising out of the dominance of any one model in the sponsorship relationship.

Practical implications

For executives involved in the management of sponsorship relationships, a rich understanding of their risks and opportunities is important. For example, rather than assuming that market-based considerations or social bonds to be either wholly positive or negative, in this paper the authors have demonstrated that each can have an important role in the dynamic of sponsorship relationships. Therefore, for example, while strong social bonds will mitigate the risks of market-based mechanisms, the risks of social bonds themselves can be balanced through appropriate intermittent recourse to market-based mechanisms. In any specific sponsorship arrangement it will become a matter of balance, and a development of understanding of the role of market, hierarchical, reciprocal and communal dimensions associated with long-term relationships.

Originality/value

In this regard, the authors offer six propositions, which capture the mitigation and enhancement of risks and opportunities, respectively, as well as considerations for relationship dynamics arising from the analysis.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Pingsheng Tong, Jean L. Johnson, U.N. Umesh and Ruby P. Lee

This paper aims to advance interfirm relationship (IR) research by applying a theoretically based typology in IR settings and empirically investigating the association of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance interfirm relationship (IR) research by applying a theoretically based typology in IR settings and empirically investigating the association of information technology (IT) and relational reciprocity with IR types.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on Fiske's relational models theory to conceptualize an IR typology. In a business service context, a questionnaire was administered and IR types modeled via a multivariate logistic regression with IT pervasiveness, IT customization, reciprocity and embeddedness as predicting variables.

Findings

The IR typology comprises communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing types. The authors find that reciprocity is more likely to associate with an equality‐matching relationship and a communal sharing relationship than with a market‐pricing relationship. Pervasive use of IT fosters an equality‐matching IR, but IT‐enabled customization distances an IR from an equality‐matching relationship.

Research limitations/implications

A theoretical implication flows from the innovative application of Fiske's relational models theory to a context of business interactions and investigation of IT in association with IR types. The affirming findings empirically validate the IR typology and offer a new perspective in studying IR structures. This research also exemplifies the theoretical value and great potentials for further exploration of the theory in IR research.

Practical implications

The IR typology equips marketing managers with a useful tool in comprehending the intricate IRs and developing appropriate strategies for effective IR management. In designing IT use in IR interactions, both the scope and specific function of IT should be considered in order to ensure that all aspects affect consistently. Managers may encourage reciprocal exchange in shifting an IR away from a calculating relationship but consider intensive IT to foster an IR emphasizing balance and correspondence.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper lies in the innovative application of Fiske's relational forms in IR settings and the empirical examination of the IT‐IR structure association. The IR typology advances IR research by offering a theoretically compelling and practically advantageous framework in studying IR structure, and the examination of IT‐IR associations brings to light the significance of IT in IR structures, which has been largely under‐explored.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Giovanna Gianesini

Drawing from theories of structural power and relational competence, this paper proposes an innovative theoretical model able to predict relationship outcomes during…

Abstract

Drawing from theories of structural power and relational competence, this paper proposes an innovative theoretical model able to predict relationship outcomes during adolescence by mapping the partners’ resources and patterns of exchange in four contexts (family, work/school, leisure time, and survival) as power bases in the relationship. Adolescent dating is an important juncture in the developmental pathway to adult partnership, both in terms of relational satisfaction and relationship violence. Power processes can capture the dynamics of both healthy and unhealthy relationships, regardless of gender, contingent to the power advantage (or disadvantage) within the relationship and can produce predictable consequences for partner’s behavior. Knowing which partner holds what kind and amount of power and in which decision-making areas may be used to predict the actions of either partner and ultimately identify the trajectories of their relationships.

Details

Intimate Relationships and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-610-5

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Rick Wicks

This paper revisits old questions of the proper subject and bounds of economics: does economics study “provisioning”? or markets? or a method of reasoning, self‐interested…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper revisits old questions of the proper subject and bounds of economics: does economics study “provisioning”? or markets? or a method of reasoning, self‐interested rational optimization?

Design/methodology/approach

A variety of scholars and others in many fields make use of a taxonomy of society consisting of three “spheres”: markets, governments, and communities. It is argued here that this tripartite taxonomy of society is fundamental and exhaustive. A variety of ways of understanding this taxonomy are explored, especially Fiske's (1991, 2004) “Relational models theory.” Then – after communities and their products, social goods, are defined more thoroughly – a visual model of interactions among the three spheres is presented.

Findings

The model is first used briefly to understand the historical development of markets. The model is then applied to understanding how economic thinking and market ideology, including the notion of social capital, can be destructive of communities and their production of social goods (and their production of social capital as well).

Research limitations/implications

It is not possible to measure these effects monetarily, so calculating precisely “how this affects results” in a standard economic model is impossible.

Practical implications

Nevertheless we could better prepare students for real‐world analysis, and better serve our clients, including the public, if – whenever relevant, such as in textbook introductions and in benefit/cost analyses – we made them aware of the limitations of economic analysis with respect to communities and social goods.

Originality/value

The three‐spheres model offered here, based on Fiske's “Relational models theory,” facilitates this awareness.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Laura Guerrero and Luciana Turchick Hakak

A dark side of global mobility is that many immigrants have negative work outcomes. Studies have analyzed the antecedents to poor work outcomes from the immigrants’ point…

Abstract

Purpose

A dark side of global mobility is that many immigrants have negative work outcomes. Studies have analyzed the antecedents to poor work outcomes from the immigrants’ point of view or from that of host country nationals. The purpose of this paper is to propose a relational model, which applies terror management theory to address how the economic mobility beliefs of immigrants and host country nationals interact and how these different combinations of beliefs affect the self-esteem of immigrants.

Design/methodology/approach

This theoretical model considers the impact of the social interactions between immigrants and host country nationals when immigrants’ mortality is salient.

Findings

In hostile environments that make immigrants’ mortality salient, lack of confirmation of immigrants’ beliefs about economic mobility from host country nationals can lead to a decrease in immigrants’ self-esteem and therefore to negative work outcomes.

Practical implications

As the number of immigrants grows, so do concerns about their ability to contribute to the economy. Lack of confirmation of their beliefs in a context in which their mortality is salient, is likely to lead to lower self-esteem and perhaps other negative outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper is the first, to the authors’ knowledge, to use terror management theory to advance our understanding of the outcome of a lack of confirmation from host country nationals of immigrants’ beliefs on economic mobility under conditions of mortality salience.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Keith Blois and Annmarie Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud which originates as an affinity fraud can utilise the interpersonal trust, which is a central feature of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a financial fraud which originates as an affinity fraud can utilise the interpersonal trust, which is a central feature of an affinity fraud, to move the fraud into situations such as organizational markets, where personal relationships are much less dominant.

Design/methodology/approach

Sources of information consisted of scholarly articles and articles retrieved from the web.

Findings

The trust which develops naturally between members of a community with common interests can be exploited by a fraudster who is, or purports to be, a member of that community. This trust can then be used as the basis of creating trust within other types of relationships – especially where some people are active in more than one relationship – where personal relationships play a minor role.

Practical implications

Both individuals and organizations when making investments should regularly formally evaluate their relationship with the organization in whom they are investing; constantly evaluate alternative relationship opportunities; and, calculate how divergent the partner's behaviour can be from the expected before dissolving the relationship.

Originality/value

This paper, by utilizing Fiske's Relational Models Theory, argues that trust that has been developed in a communal situation can be used to build up a momentum of trust. This enables the perpetrator of a fraud to extend the fraud into situations where different types (and possibly impersonal) relationships operate.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Yang Yang, Fu Jia and Zhiduan Xu

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the academic literature on Supply Chain Learning (SCL), including the definitions, drivers, sources, barriers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the academic literature on Supply Chain Learning (SCL), including the definitions, drivers, sources, barriers and consequences of SCL, and to propose an integrated conceptual model.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review has been conducted, with an analysis of 123 papers in peer-reviewed academic journals published from 1998 up to March 2018.

Findings

Through analysis and synthesis of the literature, this paper identifies and classifies the concepts of SCL into four types, that is, process orientation, structure orientation, consequence orientation and other informal definitions. Based on the Extended Resource-Based View (ERBV), the authors develop an integrated conceptual framework, which brings together various constructs. Within the framework, the authors identify the drivers and sources of SCL at intra- and inter-organizational levels. SCL consists of exploratory and exploitive learning capabilities, and the outcomes of SCL are dynamic supply chain management capabilities and sustainable supply chain performance.

Originality/value

The authors propose a capability perspective of SCL and develop a conceptual model and a number of associated propositions of SCL based on the ERBV and review findings, which is subject to future empirical testing and propose five future research directions. The findings of this paper can be extended beyond the dyad and be applied in multi-tier supply chain context.

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