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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Farooq Mubarak, Reima Suomi and Satu-Päivi Kantola

This study aims to statistically verify the links of income and education with information and communication technology (ICT) diffusion across 191 countries of the world…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to statistically verify the links of income and education with information and communication technology (ICT) diffusion across 191 countries of the world taking into account a total of 9 indicators best representing the socio-economic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Multivariate regression analysis was used as a prime method to rigorously test the relationships of income and education with ICT diffusion across 191 countries. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (V. 22) was used to analyze and predict patterns in the data.

Findings

The results support the hypotheses that income and education are positively related to ICT diffusion. The findings statistically confirm that poverty is a leading cause of digital divide worldwide.

Research limitations/implications

Academic, policy and practice groups should work in collaboration to fight against digital divide. Present results also imply that digital divide shall never end but rather it can be controlled to an extent with multiple collaborative efforts.

Originality/value

Prior research assignments on the digital divide concentrate on exploring the links between few socio-economic and ICT variables in select few regions theoretically. The present work addresses this literature gap by developing and testing two hypotheses to statistically investigate the relationships between a broad set of socio-economic and ICT indicators.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Chenglong Li, Hongxiu Li, Reima Suomi and Yong Liu

Although knowledge sharing in online communities has been studied for many years, little is known about the determinants for individuals' knowledge sharing in online…

Abstract

Purpose

Although knowledge sharing in online communities has been studied for many years, little is known about the determinants for individuals' knowledge sharing in online health communities (OHCs) surrounding smoking cessation. Examining the determinants of knowledge sharing in such OHCs from the social capital perspective may prove particularly enlightening.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based online user survey of two smoking cessation OHCs, one based in Finland and one based in China, was performed. Performing data analysis with partial least squares (SmartPLS 3.0), the authors developed a model conceptualizing the structural, cognitive and relational dimensions of social capital as drivers for knowledge sharing in smoking cessation OHCs, with users' stage in giving up smoking as a moderator.

Findings

The results show that structural capital (social ties) and relational capital (reciprocity) are important motivators behind knowledge sharing in smoking cessation OHCs, and the authors found a moderating effect of the stage in quitting on the antecedents' relationship with knowledge sharing in these OHCs.

Originality/value

The study enriches understanding of knowledge sharing in smoking cessation OHCs, contributing to theory and identifying practical implications for such groups' administration.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Chenglong Li, Hongxiu Li and Reima Suomi

An empirical study investigated the antecedents to perceived usefulness (PU) and its consequences in the context of smoking cessation online health communities (OHCs).

Abstract

Purpose

An empirical study investigated the antecedents to perceived usefulness (PU) and its consequences in the context of smoking cessation online health communities (OHCs).

Design/methodology/approach

To validate a research model for perceived informational support, perceived emotional support and perceived esteem support, the authors conducted a partial-least-squares analysis of empirical data from an online survey (N = 173) of users of two smoking cessation OHCs. The proposed model articulates these as antecedents to PU from a social support perspective, and knowledge sharing and continuance intention are expressed as consequences of PU.

Findings

The empirical study identified that the PU of smoking cessation OHCs is influenced by perceived emotional support and perceived esteem support, and perceived informational support indirectly affects PU via these factors. In turn, PU exerts a positive influence on both knowledge sharing and continuance intention. Also, knowledge sharing positively affects continuance intention.

Originality/value

The study contributes to scholarship on users' postadoption behavior in the context of smoking cessation OHCs by disentangling the antecedents to PU from a social support perspective and pinpointing some important consequences of PU. The research also has practical implications for managing smoking cessation OHCs.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1992

Lauri Ojala and Reima Suomi

Information technology in its various forms is one key component inthe effort to increase efficiency in the transport industry. Electronicdata interchange (EDI)…

Abstract

Information technology in its various forms is one key component in the effort to increase efficiency in the transport industry. Electronic data interchange (EDI), especially, in its various forms, promises to be one of the key techniques in mastering the growing volume of information. Considers whether remotely (from the markets) situated countries will benefit after the introduction of EDI, with specific discussion of the Nordic countries. No specific data collection phase was conducted for this study, which is conceptual. However, during the last five years both researchers have conducted extensive empirical research in the field, which is covered here.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Johanna Holm, Satu Lähteenmäki, Hannu Salmela, Reima Suomi, Arto Suominen and Maarit Viljanen

This paper describes a project which investigates the human resource management practices that are being used in managing information professionals in ICT companies or ICT…

Abstract

This paper describes a project which investigates the human resource management practices that are being used in managing information professionals in ICT companies or ICT departments. The effectiveness of the practices is evaluated from individual and management perspectives. It is assumed that the nature of the contract between the IS professional and the organization influences the effectiveness of different practices. Thus, the notion of “best practice” is seen as context dependent. When writing the paper, the research was still in progress and no results can yet be given. After completing the study, practitioners can use the results to compare their own practices with those that were found to be effective in the nine case organizations. For researchers, the results will provide hypotheses about the relationship between HRM practices and job satisfaction of the IS professionals.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Neeraj Sachdeva, Anne-Marie Tuikka, Kai Kristian Kimppa and Reima Suomi

The purpose of this paper is to create a conceptual framework, based on a structured literature review, to analyze the digital disability divide and help find solutions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a conceptual framework, based on a structured literature review, to analyze the digital disability divide and help find solutions for it. A digital disability divide exists between people with impairments and those without impairments. Multiple studies have shown that people without impairments are less likely to own a computer or have an Internet connection than are people with impairments. However, the digital disability divide is seen in relation not only to access but also to accessibility and use. For people with impairments, new technological innovations offer solutions for everyday challenges, such as finding information, communicating with others and using electronic services.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, 4,778 conference and journal publications were systematically analyzed.

Findings

A number of key findings emerged. This field is relatively new, and the literature is highly focused on the technological and social aspects of the digital disability divide, with technology and societal attributes being the core sub-attributes for a comprehensive model. The previous literature did not significantly study the consequences of the financial situation of individuals; rather, the predominant focus was on the have-nots and countries with low income potentials. Furthermore, motivation reveals a compelling case within the digital disability divide subset.

Originality/value

The review provides a consolidated view of past research on the general topic of the digital disability divide and the attributes that affect it.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Reima Suomi

The aim of this paper is to compare the railway and internet revolutions. What do they have in common and what is different between them, considering the 150‐year time…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to compare the railway and internet revolutions. What do they have in common and what is different between them, considering the 150‐year time difference in their occurrence? As time passes, can internet developers learn something from the railway industry?

Findings

The two industries have a lot of common. Both railways and the internet represent national infrastructures that cannot be managed just based on business management principles. As both are concerned with traffic, either that of physical goods or of messages, the two industries also seem to have a lot in technical terms when one takes a sufficiently abstract point of view. The main message is that in the long term, the railway revolution vanished and the industry turned into a low profit/interest field. The internet might follow the same path.

Research limitations/implications

The paper in its current form is based on a literature review only. Its quality could be improved with a detailed empirical study. Other similar infrastructure‐type industries could also be involved.

Practical implications

There are several things that could be improved in the management of the internet, but they are large‐scale issues needing co‐operation between the many stakeholders in the internet. Examples are those of avoiding the digital divide and catering for critical “last mile” connections, as well as managing the diversity of different standards.

Originality/value

As far as the author knows this is the first paper of its kind comparing these two industries. The message is that more cross‐industrial studies need to be performed. Also, the message of the paper – that the internet might turn into a low‐interest business in the long run – has not been discussed sufficiently.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Pasi Pyöriä

The purpose of this paper is to serve as a reminder that all work arrangements, including the present case of distributed work, have their costs and benefits.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to serve as a reminder that all work arrangements, including the present case of distributed work, have their costs and benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to a literature review, the paper presents concrete recommendations and guidelines for practicing managers about how to avoid pitfalls in distributed work arrangements and how to manage teleworkers.

Findings

The diffusion of telework has been a slower process than anticipated, among other reasons because the most vital businesses are largely concentrated in the biggest growth centres. Growth centres can offer a diverse range of both jobs and amenities that outweigh the quiet and safety of rural areas. Apart from geographical realities and regional policy issues, another factor that has decisively contributed to the slow diffusion of telework is the absence of an established contractual framework and “culture” of teleworking.

Originality/value

Telework has the best prospects of success if from the outset all the people involved know what to expect and are prepared to deal with any problems and fears associated with the new work culture. It is also important that distributed work arrangements are designed in compliance with national labour legislation. To avoid potential risks, a part‐time telework arrangement is advisable for most organizations.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Abstract

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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