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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Raquel Velada, António Caetano, Reid Bates and Ed Holton

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the construct validity of learning transfer system inventory (LTSI) for use in Portugal. Furthermore, it also aims to analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the construct validity of learning transfer system inventory (LTSI) for use in Portugal. Furthermore, it also aims to analyze whether LTSI dimensions differ across individual variables such as gender, age, educational level and job tenure.

Design/methodology/approach

After a rigorous translation process that included forward and backward translation, subjective evaluations of the translated items, and pilot testing, the Portuguese version of LTSI was completed by 484 trainees, who attended different kinds of training courses. Two separate exploratory factor analyses were run to analyze the specific and general domains covered by LTSI. An initial analysis with the validated items and a second one with the validated and research items were also completed.

Findings

The results of the initial factor analyses showed a 16‐factor structure that accurately paralleled the 16‐factor structure of the original English version and revealed that this one is the most parsimonious factor structure. Statistically significant differences in some LTSI dimensions were found across gender and education‐level variables.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected through self‐reported measures using a single instrument applied immediately after the training, which might have affected the internal validity of the study. Although this study covered a wide variety of trainees' business areas and types of training, it might be possible that some types of organizations and training were not included in the analysis, thus limiting the generalization of the results to those contexts.

Practical implications

Based on the results of this study, Portuguese companies are now able to develop their training evaluation practices and to assess the training transfer factors through a valid and reliable instrument.

Originality/value

The paper expands LTSI validity in Europe, demonstrating that it has construct validity for use in Portugal.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Reid Bates, Simone Kauffeld and Elwood F. Holton

The purpose of this research is to examine the construct and predictive ability of a German version of the Learning Transfer Systems Inventory (GLTSI), an instrument…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the construct and predictive ability of a German version of the Learning Transfer Systems Inventory (GLTSI), an instrument designed to assess a constellation of 16 factors known to influence the transfer of training in work settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data for this study was collected from 569 employees working in 17 private sector organizations in Germany. This data was used to test the construct validity of the GLTSI using principle components analysis (common factor analysis). The predictive validity of the instrument was tested against individual and organizational level outcome measures using hierarchical stepwise multiple regression.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis of the GLTSI produced a 16 factor solution that was a highly consistent original English version of the LTSI. The results of the regression analysis showed that a subset of GLTSI scales were significant predictors of measures of individual transfer results and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study relies on self‐report data for both the independent and dependent variables and, although there is no evidence suggesting this was a problem, factors such as common method variance or social desirability could have influenced the correlations in this study in unknown ways. Certainly future criterion‐related validation research with the GLTSI using outcome measures that do not rely on self‐reports would be valuable. Future research with the GLTSI should also seek to modify certain items or add new items to enhance the emic or culture‐specific nature of specific scales.

Originality/value

This study contributes the study and practice of human resource development by furthering the dissemination of analytical tools across linguistic settings and enhancing the potential for the cross‐cultural study of learning transfer and training effectiveness.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Rita Alvelos, Aristides I Ferreira and Reid Bates

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived content validity, transfer design, the motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer, contribute to the effectiveness of training.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample used consisted of 202 employees with ages between 18 and 60 years, working for an insurance company where they had training for a period of three months.

Findings

The results show a relationship between perceived content validity and transfer design, as well as with the motivation to improve work through learning. A mediating role of social support was also evident in this relationship. Finally, the authors highlight the findings of the relationship between motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the literature by demonstrating how the role of social support can increase training effectiveness in organizations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Reid Bates

This study explored the ability of liking and two forms of rater‐ratee similarity to predict multi‐source proficiency ratings of managerial competencies. Findings from the…

Abstract

This study explored the ability of liking and two forms of rater‐ratee similarity to predict multi‐source proficiency ratings of managerial competencies. Findings from the regression model that included all raters indicated that technical proficiency, rater‐ratee liking, demographic and attitudinal similarity about work all were significant predictors of proficiency ratings. For these ratings, attitudinal similarity was the strongest predictor of ratings after technical proficiency. Liking, attitudinal and demographic similarity combined increased explained variance by about one‐third over technical proficiency. Regression models, run for each rating source separately, suggested that supervisors, subordinates and peers may weigh performance and interpersonal elements differently, when making performance ratings.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Christopher J. Cowton and Andrew Wirth

Fringe, or “non‐wage”, benefits typically form an important part of the compensation package provided for employees, having grown considerably during the 20th century. One…

Abstract

Fringe, or “non‐wage”, benefits typically form an important part of the compensation package provided for employees, having grown considerably during the 20th century. One of the more traditional types of benefit, of interest in this article, is the provision of goods and services to employees at a price below that which they would normally expect to pay. More specifically, we are interested in the sale, at a discount, of a company's own products, rather than the provision of other goods and services, such as meals or private health insurance, at low rates made possible by company subsidy or the exploitation of its buying power or facilities. While a company may sometimes sell discontinued lines or damaged stock to its employees, our focus is on the sale of normal products. Our primary purpose is to show how, with an understanding of cost and revenue relationships, the problem of setting the rate of discount can be approached. The analysis draws on and extends previous work on shareholder concessions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Mehdi Khashei and Bahareh Mahdavi Sharif

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive version of a hybrid autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), and artificial neural networks (ANNs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive version of a hybrid autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), and artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to yield a more general and more accurate hybrid model for exchange rates forecasting. For this purpose, the Kalman filter technique is used in the proposed model to preprocess and detect the trend of raw data. It is basically done to reduce the existing noise in the underlying data and better modeling, respectively.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, ARIMA models are applied to construct a new hybrid model to overcome the above-mentioned limitations of ANNs and to yield a more general and more accurate model than traditional hybrid ARIMA and ANNs models. In our proposed model, a time series is considered as a function of a linear and nonlinear component, so, in the first phase, an ARIMA model is first used to identify and magnify the existing linear structures in data. In the second phase, a multilayer perceptron is used as a nonlinear neural network to model the preprocessed data, in which the existing linear structures are identified and magnified by ARIMA and to predict the future value of time series.

Findings

In this paper, a new Kalman filter based hybrid artificial neural network and ARIMA model are proposed as an alternate forecasting technique to the traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs models. In the proposed model, similar to the traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs models, the unique strengths of ARIMA and ANN in linear and nonlinear modeling are jointly used, aiming to capture different forms of relationship in the data; especially, in complex problems that have both linear and nonlinear correlation structures. However, there are no aforementioned assumptions in the modeling process of the proposed model. Therefore, in the proposed model, in contrast to the traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs, it can be generally guaranteed that the performance of the proposed model will not be worse than either of their components used separately. In addition, empirical results in both weekly and daily exchange rate forecasting indicate that the proposed model can be an effective way to improve forecasting accuracy achieved by traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs models.

Originality/value

In the proposed model, in contrast to the traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs, it can be guaranteed that the performance of the proposed model will not be worse than either of the components used separately. In addition, empirical results in exchange rate forecasting indicate that the proposed model can be an effective way to improve forecasting accuracy achieved by traditional hybrid ARIMA/ANNs models. Therefore, it can be used as an appropriate alternate model for forecasting in exchange ratemarkets, especially when higher forecasting accuracy is needed.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Graham Barlow

Discusses British Rail’s (BR’s) organizational transformation during the 1980s and in particular the position of R.B. Reid, chairman of the British Railways Board (BRB…

Abstract

Discusses British Rail’s (BR’s) organizational transformation during the 1980s and in particular the position of R.B. Reid, chairman of the British Railways Board (BRB) during that period. As a career railwayman, Reid was an atypical choice to chair the BRB. Considers how Reid brought his professional knowledge and experience to bear in carrying through arguably one of the most fundamental processes of change and organizational development that BR has experienced in the past 40 years.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2009

Max Neill, Julie Allen, Neil Woodhead, Helen Sanderson, Stephen Reid and Lori Erwin

This article discusses the question of risk in the lives of people who are supported by human services. It responds to the way in which risk, as it has traditionally been…

Abstract

This article discusses the question of risk in the lives of people who are supported by human services. It responds to the way in which risk, as it has traditionally been approached by these services, imposes a barrier to social inclusion and to an interesting and productive life. The article proposes an alternative person‐centred risk process. We argue that, by beginning with a focus on who the person is, their gifts and skills, and offering a positive vision of success, it could be possible to avoid the implied aversion to any form of risk embedded in the traditional approaches and attitudes.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Ayman Safi Abdelhakim, Eleri Jones, Elizabeth C. Redmond, Christopher J. Griffith and Mahmoud Hewedi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the evaluation of cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the evaluation of cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a snowballing technique, 26 cabin crew, managers, supervisors and trainers participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Summative content analysis was used to evaluate the data.

Findings

In total, 26 respondents from 20 international airlines participated in the study. All respondents agreed that evaluating cabin crew food safety/hygiene issues is important in relation to in-flight food handling; for example, “Training evaluation helps in the improvement of the future training”; “We have an end of course feedback form, either done electronically or on paper and that looks at how the delegates felt the training went, if they came away learning something new, if the environment for learning was right, all sorts of things; the questionnaire is quite comprehensive”; and “Every trainee is given a feedback form to complete”. However, significant failures in food safety training and its evaluation were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation of cabin crew food safety training shows that it is ineffective in some aspects, including learning achieved and behavioural change, and these can directly impact on the implementation of food safety practices. Evaluation failures may be due to the lack of available time in relation to other cabin crew roles. Further research may consider using a larger sample size, evaluating training effectiveness using social cognition models and assessments of airline and cabin crew food safety culture.

Originality/value

This is the first study that evaluates cabin crew food safety training using the Kirkpatrick model. The findings provide an understanding of the current evaluation of cabin crew food safety training and can be used by airlines for improving and developing effective future food safety training programmes. This, in turn, may reduce the risk of passenger and crew foodborne disease.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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