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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Abeer Shakweer and Reham M. Youssef

This paper aims to discuss the Egyptian experience in futures studies through the conducting of a foresight study into the future of water in Egypt to 2025.

1697

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the Egyptian experience in futures studies through the conducting of a foresight study into the future of water in Egypt to 2025.

Design/methodology/approach

Futures wheel, questionnaires, focus groups, and scenarios workshops have been used in this study.

Findings

The paper represents the obstacles that had to be surmounted in engaging key stakeholders in the foresight study and suggests a set of conclusions and recommendations that could help in a better integration of futures studies into the Government's strategic planning process.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a tailored methodology for a successful scenarios building process in Egypt. Also, it advises on how futures studies could be integrated into the policy making process in Egypt.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Reham I. Elseidi

This study aims to explore the perceptions of Arabian Muslim consumers about halal food products and to investigate their behaviour towards halal-labelled food products in…

2632

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions of Arabian Muslim consumers about halal food products and to investigate their behaviour towards halal-labelled food products in UK mainstream supermarkets using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). The role of Islamic religiosity and consumers’ confidence regarding the halal logo as moderating factors is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected through distributed 400 questionnaires in Scotland, mainly to Muslim consumers who come from different Arabian countries and are currently living in Scotland.

Findings

The results show that the TPB is a valid model for predicting Muslim consumers’ intention to purchase halal-labelled food products. The findings reveal that for consumers with high and low Islamic religiosity, subjective norms are the most influential determinants of their intention to purchase halal-labelled food products.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the focus on only Arabian Muslim consumers within an ethnic minority population living in Scotland, and the use of convenience and snowball sampling.

Practical implications

The findings could be useful for halal industry food makers to better serve their customers through sophisticated marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study extends understanding of consumers’ halal-labelled food purchasing behaviour using TPB to determining the rationales for purchasing halal foods from mainstream UK supermarkets. Unlike others studies, this study used Islamic religiosity instead of self-identity (being a Muslim) as a moderating factor.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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