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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Deirdre Healy

This paper aims to consider the advantages to using the Rehabilition Code within personal injury litigation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the advantages to using the Rehabilition Code within personal injury litigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed to take the reader through the key features of the Rehabilitation Code, how the Code is implemented on a practical level and the advantages to both Claimant and Defendant Advisors in utilising the Code.

Findings

The article highlights that the early provision of rehabilitation can make a significant and positive contribution to the life of an injured party. It actively encourages all parties involved in the litigation process to act in a collaborative manner and to fully engage with the Rehabilitation Code.

Originality/value

This paper sets out a framework for legal advisors to use when considering the provision of early rehabilitation within litigation.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2013

John F. Kros, Evelyn Brown, Rhonda Joyner, Paul Heath and Laura Helms

The application of forecasting to health care is not new. A frequent issue in many Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities (IRFs) is the fluctuating and unpredictable census…

Abstract

The application of forecasting to health care is not new. A frequent issue in many Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities (IRFs) is the fluctuating and unpredictable census. With scarce resources, particularly physical therapists and occupational therapists, this unpredictability makes appropriate scheduling of these resources challenging. This research addresses the issue of patient admissions in an inpatient rehabilitation facility attached to an 861 bed level-one trauma hospital. The goal is to develop a predictive model for the IRF's Census to assist in resource planning (e.g., labor, beds, and materials).

Details

Advances in Business and Management Forecasting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-331-5

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson

Abstract

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2010

Stacy Lee Burns and Mark Peyrot

Purpose – This study tracks the legal control of the problem of substance abuse.Methodology/Approach – The chapter explores the “natural history” of the evolution of the…

Abstract

Purpose – This study tracks the legal control of the problem of substance abuse.

Methodology/Approach – The chapter explores the “natural history” of the evolution of the social construction of drug use and our collective response to it. Over the past 100 years, our understanding of drug use/abuse and the system for handling drug problems have gone through a series of changes. In the past 20 years or so, provision of treatment for drug offenders within the criminal justice system has rapidly expanded. California's recently enacted Proposition 36 (Prop 36) initiates for the first time on a mass basis the court-supervised drug treatment that began a decade earlier on a much smaller scale with the original drug courts. This chapter compares the Prop 36 program for diverting nonviolent drug offenders into court-supervised treatment with the original drug courts.

Findings – The research shows how court-supervised drug treatment has evolved from a personalized care program in the original drug courts to a mass processing operation under Prop 36. The research finds that the social problem solution of offering treatment to more drug defendants created its own unanticipated consequences and problems, including significant standardization in the operations of the court and a dilution of many useful features that defined the early drug courts.

Practical implications – “Farming out” drug defendants to probation and treatment makes case-processing and treatment potentially less effective therapeutically. The chapter raises questions about how social control can extend its domain without “breaking the bank” and what the consequences are for how social problems are handled.

Details

New Approaches to Social Problems Treatment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-737-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Huraera Jabeen

Dhaka is one of the most vulnerable cities facing exacerbated disaster risks from climate change impacts. While these risks have escalated rapid population growth has made…

Abstract

Dhaka is one of the most vulnerable cities facing exacerbated disaster risks from climate change impacts. While these risks have escalated rapid population growth has made Dhaka one of the fastest growing megacities in Asia with a very high housing demand. In the absence of significant interventions from the public sector, the private sector has become responsible for 70 per cent of the city’s physical development. The political economy of development and limitations in institutional arrangements allow private sector investors an almost free hand, resulting in increased and transferred risks to the public sector and city dwellers in general. Any post-disaster reconstruction in future will be influenced by these existing dynamics. Future plans for post-disaster reconstruction of housing in Dhaka must address issues of growing demand, limitations of risk-free land for development, ownership of land and housing, and limitations of resources.

Details

Open House International, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Ishani Buddika Soysa, Nihal Palitha Jayamaha and Nigel Peter Grigg

The purpose of this paper is to develop a performance measurement (PM) framework for Australasian nonprofit organisations (NPOs) involved in healthcare, and operational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a performance measurement (PM) framework for Australasian nonprofit organisations (NPOs) involved in healthcare, and operational descriptions for each PM dimension within this framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature relating to the balanced scorecard and other PM frameworks was examined to develop an initial conceptual model, and this model was substantially improved by collecting qualitative data from nine Australian and New Zealand healthcare NPOs using a case study approach.

Findings

The study identifies nine causally related PM dimensions: mission, strategy, organisational capabilities, infrastructure and people development (people and information), financial health, processes, and stakeholder satisfaction (clients, people, and donors). The study also recognised that “Mission” and “Strategy” should be PM dimensions and that healthcare NPOs should focus on satisfying its people, not only donors and clients. Additionally, 41 operational descriptions are developed for each of these dimensions and can enable detailed PM items to be derived by organisations.

Originality/value

The study is the first study that has been undertaken to develop a PM framework for the Australasian NPOs to a level that it can be readily used by the practitioners (following customisation to their own specific context). The developed model also serves as a basis for future quantitative academic research aimed at testing and empirical validation of the conceptual model.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Selma Ebrahim

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multi-professional approved clinicians (MPACs), responsible for the care of patients detained under the Mental Health Act…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multi-professional approved clinicians (MPACs), responsible for the care of patients detained under the Mental Health Act (2007), can enable clinical leadership in mental health settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was completed by clinical psychology and mental health nursing practitioners in a mental health trust in the UK working towards or having gained approved clinician (AC) status, identifying barriers to implementation of the roles and enablers. Qualitative interview data were also gathered with psychiatrists, clinical psychologist and Mental Health Nurse ACs (three in each group).

Findings

There are a number of barriers and enablers of distributed leadership promoted by the MPAC role. Themes identified focused on enabling person-centred care, clinical leadership and culture change more broadly within mental health care. The AC role is supporting clinical leadership by a range of professionals, promoting patient choice by enabling access to clinicians with the appropriate skills to meet needs. Clinical leadership roles are promoting links between organisational priorities, teams and patient care, fostering distributed leadership in practice.

Research limitations/implications

This project reflects the views of a limited number of practitioners within one organisation which limits generalisabilty.

Practical implications

Organisations need clear strategies linked to workforce development and implementation of the roles to capitalise on their potential to support clinical leadership and person-centred care.

Originality/value

This study provides initial qualitative data on potential benefits and challenges of implementing the role.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Johanna E. Foster and Rebecca Sanford

The purpose of this paper is to apply a feminist perspective to the crisis in prison higher education in the US by exploring whether gender shapes access to on‐site…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a feminist perspective to the crisis in prison higher education in the US by exploring whether gender shapes access to on‐site, non‐occupational college programs in state prisons differently for women than for men.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilized a content analysis of official US state departments of correction websites and an email survey of state directors of education.

Findings

Findings show that while both women and men had little access to on‐site, non‐occupational college programming in the 2005‐2006 academic year, women in state prison had slightly greater access than men.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical implications of the findings include the importance of focusing a gender lens on correctional education programming, as well as the importance of extending analysis beyond gender alone towards an analysis of the intersections of gender, race, and class inequalities on access to prison higher education.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the identification of an emergent educational justice movement in the USA, and the presentation of exploratory data on the current college‐in‐prison programs useful for progressive activists, policymakers, correctional education administrators, equity scholars, and others interested in organizing around democratic access to postsecondary correctional education.

Originality/value

As there is little current research on college‐in‐prison programs in the US, and less on the gendered dimensions of program access, the paper makes an original valuable contribution to several literatures.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Sara J. Wilkinson, Kimberley James and Richard Reed

This paper seeks to establish the rationale for existing office building adaptation within Melbourne, Australia, as the city strives to become carbon neutral by 2020. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to establish the rationale for existing office building adaptation within Melbourne, Australia, as the city strives to become carbon neutral by 2020. The problems faced by policy makers to determine which buildings have the optimum adaptation potential are to be identified and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts the approach of creating a database of all the buildings in the Melbourne CBD including details of physical, social, economic and technological attributes. This approach will determine whether relationships exist between attributes and the frequency of building adaptation or whether triggers to adaptation can be determined.

Findings

This research provided evidence that a much faster rate of office building adaptation is necessary to meet the targets already set for carbon neutrality. The findings demonstrate that a retrospective comprehensive examination of previous adaptation in the CBD is a unique and original approach to determining the building characteristics associated with adaptation and whether triggers can be identified based on previous practices. The implication is that a decision‐making tool should be developed to allow policy makers to target sectors of the office building stock to deliver carbon neutrality within the 2020 timeframe.

Practical implications

Drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are required to mitigate global warming and climate change and all stakeholders should be looking at ways of reducing emissions from existing stock.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing body of knowledge by raising awareness of the way in which the adaptation of large amounts of existing stock can be fast tracked to mitigate the impact of climate change and warming associated with the built environment, and in addition it establishes a framework for a decision‐making tool for policy makers.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Christine Wamsler

Imagine, for a moment, human settlements that are organised to overcome and withstand earthquakes or hurricanes, infrastructures that reinforce themselves and seal cracks…

Abstract

Imagine, for a moment, human settlements that are organised to overcome and withstand earthquakes or hurricanes, infrastructures that reinforce themselves and seal cracks of their own accord, or buildings that elevate themselves during flooding. Imagine settlements that provide information systems that warn when a tsunami is approaching, or when houses are overburdened and may be liable to imminent collapse due to landslides, fire or other hazards. Such human settlements would secure the livelihood of all their inhabitants, empowering them to cope and deal with natural threats. As with a living organism, these settlements would adjust their social, political and economic systems in such a rapid way that they can account for damage, effect repairs, learn from experience, and retire - urbanely - once they can no longer fulfil their protective and defensible function.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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