Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Jane Knight

In the last decade, the speed and intensity with which regional level connections are expanding in all areas of the world has been remarkable. Higher education in Africa…

Abstract

In the last decade, the speed and intensity with which regional level connections are expanding in all areas of the world has been remarkable. Higher education in Africa is no exception. This chapter focuses on African policies and programme initiatives to further higher education regionalization. Regionalization is defined as the process of ‘building closer collaboration and alignment among higher education actors and systems in a designated area or framework, commonly called a region’. An analytical framework, consisting of functional, organizational and political approaches, is applied to the evolution of higher education regionalization at the continental level in Africa through a close examination of the progress related to the implementation of the “African Union Strategy for the Harmonization of Higher Education Programmes.” Special emphasis is given to the harmonization of degree structures and the recognition of qualifications through sub-regional qualification frameworks. Key issues and challenges such as rationales, governance, benefits and risks, unintended consequences, language, engagement for all and innovation are raised at the end of the chapter to stimulate further reflection and exploration of the complex process of higher education regionalization.

Details

The Development of Higher Education in Africa: Prospects and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-699-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Yossef Ben‐Meir

The purpose of this paper is to explain the Moroccan Roadmap to regionalize the country (with the Western Sahara) that is currently presented in principle or general…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the Moroccan Roadmap to regionalize the country (with the Western Sahara) that is currently presented in principle or general guidelines. By providing greater operational definition to the Roadmap and specific recommendations (including budgetary) for its implementation, the Moroccan and international public and policy makers will see the challenges and merits of the plan, including the potential to significantly advance human development and resolve the Western Saharan conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

There are three methods applied in the research of this paper. First, public statements made by King Mohammed VI of Morocco related to regionalization and all aspects of development (community, gender (though not addressed here), human, participatory, reconciliation, and sustainable) were organized chronologically and categorized. This put in place the principle tenets of Morocco's Roadmap. Second, the basic constructed Roadmap is then evaluated against the literature in the field of decentralization and development. This provides a sense of direction the Roadmap intends for transferring power to the sub‐national level and promoting local development. Finally, recommendations for the Roadmap's implementation are presented that reflect the literature and the author's 18 years experience in development in Morocco.

Findings

Morocco's Roadmap is relatively innovative as compared against other international decentralization models because it incorporates three of the four major approaches applied in cases around the world to transfer power from the national to sub‐national tiers, and does so in a way that intends to marshal local to national resources toward supporting community‐driven initiatives. This presents considerable opportunities to improve socio‐economic and environmental conditions, and reform vital institutions.

Research limitations/implications

Morocco's Roadmap is broadly stated, and the Advisory Committee on Regionalization appointed by the King is due to have its recommendations for implementation ready to present by 2011. Thus, there is an element of projection in the research by way of building a more clearly defined Roadmap (in order to make it operational) through a literature analysis of its basic‐stated precepts.

Social implications

The leaders and people of the region and the international community feel a new sense of urgency to resolve the Western Saharan conflict because of the disunity it creates in North Africa, and therefore insecurity and volatility at a crossroads of its hemisphere in a globally insecure time. The international community also seems generally receptive to Morocco's regionalization proposal, which now extends to the whole of the Kingdom a transferring of power from the capital to the regions. The essay provides a clear rationale and description of the proposal/plan, and specificity as to how it can be implemented. It will likely be well received by policy‐makers internationally and those charged in Morocco with implementing the plan.

Originality/value

Just in this past year, there has been a real increase in scholarly, governmental, civil, and public attention on Moroccan regionalization, but it generally remains abstract and unclear as to what it is and involves. This essay provides more vivid detail by thoroughness of research of Moroccan and international sources and the author's extensive experience in working with Moroccan administrations in regards to development, project management, and applying the participatory method (the approach Morocco's King repeatedly stated is intended to drive Moroccan regionalization).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Joclarisse Espiritu Albia and Sheng-Ju Chan

Regionalisation in education has gained increased interest and importance because of the increasing collaborations among neighbouring nations. Definitions of the term…

Abstract

Purpose

Regionalisation in education has gained increased interest and importance because of the increasing collaborations among neighbouring nations. Definitions of the term vary, and more so the regionalisation practices and initiatives of higher educational institutions. In the Philippines, the emphasis on regionalisation has become even more pronounced with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Integration Vision. This vision of the ASEAN is geared towards enhancing regional collaboration and the creation of an ASEAN identity and puts education at the forefront, considering it as a strategic objective to achieve the region’s development agenda of economic, social and cultural growth. It becomes of paramount importance then to examine how regionalisation in education is understood by university constituents, its manifestations in terms of institutional activities and especially, how the ASEAN Integration shapes these initiatives and constructions of regionalisation. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multiple case study design that looked at three higher education institutions (HEIs) in the Philippines, this study found that regionalisation is associated and interchanged with internationalisation in terms of purpose, goal and activities, but is differentiated in dimensions of geographical location and orientation.

Findings

Institutional initiatives pertaining to regionalisation were largely functional and mostly open and soft collaborations. The ASEAN Integration creates an ASEAN-centric consciousness, and functions as an opportunity for expanding partnerships, institutional niches and programmatic initiatives; and for legitimising regionalisation and internationalisation goals.

Originality/value

These definitions and approaches to regionalisation have significant policy implications as HEIs strive to respond to the challenges of the Integration.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Andre Sammartino and Thomas Osegowitsch

The paper aims to motivate more rigorous theoretical and empirical specification of the home regionalization phenomenon, in particular the dynamics of shifting advantage…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to motivate more rigorous theoretical and empirical specification of the home regionalization phenomenon, in particular the dynamics of shifting advantage over time within a multinational enterprise. It aims to improve dialogue among regionalization researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

Contrasting the economizing and behavioral perspectives on internationalization, the paper presents five different archetypes of the home‐regionalization phenomenon. These archetypes are predicated on strategic management stylizations of competitive advantage.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that the notion of home regionalization as a dominant and superior model for firm internationalization remains a promising yet under‐explained and inconsistently articulated thesis. By introducing and exploring the archetypes, it shows the diversity of home‐regionalization theses, and the prospect that multiple forms of regionalization may be at play for different firms, industries and locations.

Originality/value

The paper presents the full complement of archetypes of the home‐regionalization phenomenon and explores their corresponding assumptions. These explorations open up new empirical and theoretical research avenues for distinguishing any genuine region effects.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Leonore Van den Ende, Ronald van Steden and Kees Boersma

The purpose of this paper is to advance ongoing debates on the organizational impact of wider public sector reform in the field of organizational change management by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance ongoing debates on the organizational impact of wider public sector reform in the field of organizational change management by presenting an analysis the regionalization of the fire service in the Netherlands. How regionalization has impacted the work floor of local fire stations, where the workplace majority comprises volunteers, requires further empirical investigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply an interpretive approach and qualitative methodology to study how volunteer firefighters and public management make sense of public reform and the ensuing organizational change.

Findings

Findings indicate that while the fire service has professionalized, notable tensions have emerged between public management and volunteers, the regional and local level of fire service and between professionalism and volunteerism which are problematised in the paper.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is found in the insight it provides in the sensemaking of volunteer firefighters and public managers of diverse of change regions and fire stations during the regionalization process by applying an emergent perspective to change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Keith J. Kelley

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the causal relationships of the liabilities of inter-regional foreignness to show that the process of regionalization itself has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the causal relationships of the liabilities of inter-regional foreignness to show that the process of regionalization itself has affected firms’ strategic capabilities and focus. The constraints of these regions, a consequence of regionalization that limits the strategic options of multinational enterprises, are known as the liabilities of regionalization (LOR).

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews previous literature and uses a mixture of theory and inference to make propositions regarding the existence of liabilities attributable to the regionalization process. The propositions discuss macro-level, and industry and firm-level strategic impact on firms of Triad and non-Triad regions.

Findings

It is argued specific emerging market attributes, in relation to the developed Triad regions, will influence strategic focus of those emerging market firms. This in turn will also influence global strategic behavior and capabilities in the future, creating additional LOR in some cases and reducing them in others.

Originality/value

Previous scholars have focused on the liabilities of inter-regional and regional foreignness and its effect on international diversification strategy both upstream and downstream. This study attempts to explain the formation of regions that shape the FSAs that limit global strategic diversification, which are characterized as the LOR. More importantly, it discusses them from perspective of emerging market firms, which on the outside of the Triad regions, may form their own regions and FSAs.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2010

Ans Kolk

While publications on the regional nature of multinational enterprises have sparked a lively debate about the nature and measurement of regionalization and…

Abstract

While publications on the regional nature of multinational enterprises have sparked a lively debate about the nature and measurement of regionalization and (semi)globalization, and performance implications are starting to be addressed, the broader societal and sustainability dimensions have received limited attention. Likewise, international business research on these issues has generally not considered regionalization and its consequences. This paper extends insights from the regionalization literature and broadens the debate by exploring aspects that arise when societal and sustainability implications are taken into account as well. It outlines several areas for further research, addressing geographic scope, organizational levels, and upstream/downstream and country/industry/issue peculiarities

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Deane Neubauer

The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the historic ways of reviewing patterns of regional engagement, with special attention to how the emergent concepts of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the historic ways of reviewing patterns of regional engagement, with special attention to how the emergent concepts of higher education (HE) regionalization stand in relationship to regionalism. Additional implications are spelled out for governance, citizenship and university transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual essay is meant to appear in conjunction with more discrete, case‐oriented examinations of Asia Pacific HE regionalization.

Findings

Discussions of regionalism in Asian HE are being replaced by those focused on regionalization; the former is a nation‐state and geographic policy framework whereas the latter tends to refer to emergent empirical relationships. Regionalization itself can be further distinguished in terms of its “older” forms, focused on geographic proximities and exchanges defined and carried out within those proximities. New regionalization is increasingly linked to global circuits of exchange in which the currencies of such exchanges are closely linked to the emergent dynamics of the knowledge society and economy. These dynamics in turn are closely linked to patterns of migration and mobility in HE and the efforts of higher education institutions (HEIs) and regional governments to develop new governance structure structures appropriate for this style of regionalization. These regional dynamics reflect tensions that draw institutions and nations together (centripetal forces) and those that keep them apart (centrifugal forces). These processes are marked by governance dynamics, those of affinity and affiliation, transnational innovation, and redefinitions of the responsibilities and promises of citizenship.

Originality/value

Use of these modal concepts can be used to promote and extend a region‐wide discussion and related research relevant to HE transformation within the region.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Hei-hang Hayes Tang

This paper aims to examine the strategic role of world-class universities and the international academic profession in the regionalisation project of China’s Greater Bay…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the strategic role of world-class universities and the international academic profession in the regionalisation project of China’s Greater Bay Area (GBA). It illustrates the way in which the case of the GBA regionalisation project offers a potentially rich empirical example for adding contextual understanding to the literature of the Triple Helix model, which largely draws on inductive theorising from western successful innovation cases. The GBA regionalisation processes will provide a wealth of empirical cases for identifying circumstances that address tensions and increase interactions in the Triple Helix relationship of university, government and industry for fostering knowledge synergies.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on the case of Hong Kong, it engages in policy and stakeholder analysis and addresses three key research questions: What are the competitive advantages and potential strategic role of Hong Kong's universities and academic profession in the regionalisation of innovation systems in the GBA? What is the role of the governments in the regionalisation processes? What are the expected opportunities and challenges offered by the GBA policy initiatives for the future development of Hong Kong’s universities and academic profession?

Findings

Hong Kong, given its status as an international finance centre and global city with intense internationalisation and established judicial system operated by the rule of law, will contribute to the GBA development by leveraging on its edge in scientific research and development and international networks of academic research through the world-class academic profession. Scientists and researchers in the city, possessing the competitive advantages of basic research and international partnerships, are highly regarded by the central government. The engagement of Hong Kong’s scientific talents, can play an important role in achieving China’s aspiration of becoming a global technology power.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis of this article implies that the GBA concept is currently China’s ambitious but vague economic plan. The opportunities in which key node cities and knowledge/ innovation clusters will capture and capitalise from the regional ‘co-opetitive” ’entrepreneurial ecosystem are still unclear. The future of the GBA regionalisation is so dynamic and open-ended that grounded concepts related to the governance innovation/ discourse of ‘one country two systems’ and social connectedness and capitalisation with Chinese characteristics will help in making sense of the contextualisation of a Chinese regional innovation system and enhancing the sophistication of reconceptualisation of the Triple Helix model.

Originality/value

This article will add to the literature some novel contextualised knowledge about the GBA’s potential triple-helix relationship between government-university-industry in the 21st century. The empirical example of China’s GBA will also shed light on a new understanding of the role of international social capital in the entrepreneurial knowledge economy, dynamics between basic and applied research, and a synergistic interface between regionalisation and national innovation system.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Angela Yung Chi Hou, Christopher Hill, Karen Hui-Jung Chen, Sandy Tsai and Vivian Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional Institution of Higher Education and Development, University Mobility in Asia and Pacific (UMAP), and Campus Asia – and provide a comparative analysis of the respective programs in terms of the role of government, institutional involvement, quality assurance, and challenges. In addition, the paper will assess their impacts on higher education regionalization by regulatory models toward the end of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts qualitative document analysis as a major research method to explore the developmental models of three student mobility programs. Document analysis is an approach used to gather and review the content of existing written documentation related to the study in order to extract pieces of information in a rigorous and systematic manner.

Findings

ASEAN International Mobility for Students (AIMS), Collective Action for Mobility Program of University Student in Asia (CAMPUS Asia), and UMAP student mobility schemes have a shared purpose in higher education regionalization, but with different regulatory frameworks and Functional, Organizational, and Political approach models. AIMS and CAMPUS Asia as a strong network and government-led initiatives adopt a combination of functional, organizational, and political approaches; UMAP provides university-driven regional mobility programs with a hybridized force. However, all three of them face the same challenges at regional and national levels, such as different national regulation, coordination among participants, and implementation of credit transfer schemes.

Practical implications

The scale of three student mobility programs is still low, which results in limited impact on higher education regionalization in Asia. However, a stronger decision-making model and increased financial support to universities and students are desirable for the creation of a sustainable and effective network.

Originality/value

This is an original research and makes a great contribution to Asian nations.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000