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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Reginald Silver

The purpose of this research study was to obtain healthcare executives’ perspectives on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The study focused on identifying perspectives…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research study was to obtain healthcare executives’ perspectives on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The study focused on identifying perspectives about diversity and its potential impact on the access of healthcare services by people of color. The study also identified perspectives about factors that influence the attainment of executive healthcare roles by people of color.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of healthcare executives was obtained. The executives identified themselves as belonging to one of two subgroups, White healthcare executives or executives of color. Participants were interviewed telephonically in a semi-structured format. The interviews were transcribed and entered into a qualitative software application. The data were codified and important themes were identified.

Findings

The majority of the study participants perceive that diversity of the executive healthcare leadership team is important. There were differences in perspective among the subgroups as it relates to solutions to improve access to healthcare by people of color. There were also differences in perspective among the subgroups, as it relates to explaining the underrepresentation of people of color in executive healthcare leadership roles.

Research limitations/implications

This research effort benefited from the subject matter expertise of 24 healthcare executives from two states. Expansion of the number of survey participants and broadening the geographical spread of where participants were located may have yielded more convergence and/or more divergence in perspectives about key topics.

Practical implications

The findings from this research study serve to add to the existing body of literature on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The findings expand on the importance of key elements in contemporary literature such as diversity, cultural competency and perspectives about the need for representation of people of color in leadership roles that guide healthcare policy and access. This study connects contemporary literature to perspectives of executives in the field and offers practical solutions to improving the representation of people of color in executive healthcare leadership roles.

Social implications

The recommendations offered as a result of this research effort serve to create awareness of the challenges that people of color face in career attainment. Although the process of increasing the representation of people of color in executive healthcare leadership will be a complex task that will involve a number of players over the course of several years, this study serves to provide a practical roadmap with actionable tactics that can be deployed.

Originality/value

This paper is an extension of the work that was done by the author during the course of completing the program requirements for the author’s doctoral program. The findings were previously discussed in the author’s dissertation. The value of these findings is significant because they validate some of the topics in contemporary literature with the perspectives of practicing healthcare executives. This study is also unique from other studies in that it offers a long-term plan to increase the representation of people of color in executive roles by creating an early disposition toward executive level roles and identifies a number of practical steps toward that end.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Reginald Silver and Mark Martin

At the nexus of servant leadership and empathic care, this paper aims to explore the perceptions that mid-level practitioners express regarding the role that servant leadership…

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Abstract

Purpose

At the nexus of servant leadership and empathic care, this paper aims to explore the perceptions that mid-level practitioners express regarding the role that servant leadership plays in fostering an environment of empathic care.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed mid-level practitioners across a large integrated health system (n = 167). Through exploratory factor analysis, we identify factors that serve as antecedents to an environment of empathic care. The factor analysis was complimented with partial least squares structural equation modeling to test a theoretical model of empathic care.

Findings

The model explains approximately 37% of the variance observed in an empathic care environment (R2 = 0.372). The authors identify key constructs within servant leadership that health-care leaders can focus their efforts on to promote an environment of empathic care.

Originality/value

This study answers multiple calls for more empirical research into servant leadership and is one of the few studies that explores servant leadership within an exogeneous context. This research focuses on the perceptions of mid-level providers, whereas most extant servant leadership and empathy research focuses on the perceptions of patients. The authors extend servant leadership theory in a health-care context and support prior findings that servant leadership is a multidimensional construct. The authors outline a sound methodological approach for investigating the linkage between specific principles of servant leadership that can serve as predictors for the creation of an environment of empathic care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1919

We understood that the Library Association was to send a deputation to the L.G.B. before May; we have heard nothing of such an event. This may be due to inaction, but is possibly…

Abstract

We understood that the Library Association was to send a deputation to the L.G.B. before May; we have heard nothing of such an event. This may be due to inaction, but is possibly attri‐butable to the enormous pressure upon Dr. Addison of other matters which prevent him giving attention to the question of the library position. We must wait patiently with the rather bitter consolation that we expected our precious Executive Committee to be too late.

Details

New Library World, vol. 21 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1978

Reginald Revans

Mine host Action learning—an approach to education that emphasises the distinctions between doing things oneself and talking about things getting done by others in general—has…

Abstract

Mine host Action learning—an approach to education that emphasises the distinctions between doing things oneself and talking about things getting done by others in general—has celebrated its silver jubilee. For it was in 1952 that the writer, having given up his post with the National Coal Board through lack of confidence in traditional methods of management education, persuaded the National Association of Colliery Managers to try action learning. 22 members formed themselves into a consortium, chose management apprentices to work with them, exchanged underofficials for the collective study of four prevailing operational problems, and voted for one of their fellow members to be seconded to work full‐time with the writer; our task was to build out of this miscellany a network of mutual advice, criticism and support. The theory was that each mine formed so individual and complex an organism that only those presently working in it could hope to improve the way it functioned, and only those themselves trying to change their own systems could understand the inner resistances to offering and receiving usable advice, even in a market of comrades trying to deal with identical troubles. Action learning is intended therefore to ensure that managers shall learn better to manage with and from each other in the course of tackling the very problems that it is their proper business to tackle; it has no truck with academic simulations of any kind.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Paula A. Baxter

Acknowledges that research on objects belonging to the categories of furniture, glass and stained glass, metalware, pottery and porcelain, or rugs and carpets involves the…

1010

Abstract

Acknowledges that research on objects belonging to the categories of furniture, glass and stained glass, metalware, pottery and porcelain, or rugs and carpets involves the consultation of specific handbooks and guides. Lists, with a brief description, various decorative‐art reference books as sources for research in these categories, and offers relevant subject headings so that the New York Public Library’s catalogs can be checked for similar holdings.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1969

J.A. von Fraunhofer

The corrosion behaviour of lead and its alloys in sea‐water is of great commercial interest in view of the considerable use of submerged telecommunications cables and the growing…

Abstract

The corrosion behaviour of lead and its alloys in sea‐water is of great commercial interest in view of the considerable use of submerged telecommunications cables and the growing use of lead anodes for cathodic protection of marine structures. This article is concerned with the corrosion of lead in sea‐water and saline solutions and with the anodic behaviour of lead in chloride solutions.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act…

1371

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1902

THE credulity of enthusiasm was never better exemplified than in the case of John Dee. Here we have a man almost typical of Elizabethan England: necromancer, seer, alchemist…

Abstract

THE credulity of enthusiasm was never better exemplified than in the case of John Dee. Here we have a man almost typical of Elizabethan England: necromancer, seer, alchemist, mathematician, and lastly, instead of firstly, natural philosopher. It was the age of portents, of abnormalities made normal, of magicians, of the powers of good and evil, of the striving after the unknown whilst the knowable was persistently overlooked. Swift sums up these philosophers in “Gulliver's Travels,” and two centuries earlier Erasmus in his “Praise of Folly” notes them. “Next come the philosophers,” he writes, “who esteem themselves the only favourites of wisdom; they build castles in the air, and infinite worlds in a vacuum. They'll give you to a hair's breadth the dimensions of the sun, when indeed they are unable to construe the mechanism of their own body: yet they spy out ideas, universals, separate forms, first matters, quiddities, formalities, and keep correspondence with the stars.” Such was John Dee, a compound of boundless enthusiasm and boundless credulity. There is nothing abnormal about him, for he is to be judged by the age in which he lived. His belief in witchcraft and intercourse with spirits was shared by all the men of his time save the abnormal Reginald Scott, whose famous “Discovery of Witchcraft” produced James the First's impassioned reply.

Details

New Library World, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

ANOTHER Annual Meeting has come and gone. It was scarcely to be expected that the meeting at Bradford would be a record in the number of members attending, seeing that it is only…

Abstract

ANOTHER Annual Meeting has come and gone. It was scarcely to be expected that the meeting at Bradford would be a record in the number of members attending, seeing that it is only three years ago since the Association met in the neighbouring city of Leeds, and that Bradford cannot boast either the historical associations or the architectural and scenic setting of many other towns. For the most part therefore the members who did attend, attended because they were interested in the serious rather than the entertainment or excursion side of the gathering, which was so far perhaps to the advantage of the meetings and discussions. Nevertheless, the actual number of those present—about two hundred—was quite satisfactory, and none, we are assured, even if the local functions were the main or an equal element of attraction, could possibly have regretted their visit to the metropolis of the worsted trade. Fortunately the weather was all that could be desired, and under the bright sunshine Bradford looked its best, many members, who expected doubtless to find a grey, depressing city of factories, being pleasingly disappointed with the fine views and width of open and green country quite close at hand.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1946

W.R. LE FANU

The only comprehensive list of British medical libraries hitherto available has been that in The Aslib directory 1928, and there is an extended account of those in London in…

Abstract

The only comprehensive list of British medical libraries hitherto available has been that in The Aslib directory 1928, and there is an extended account of those in London in Reginald Rye, The students' guide to the libraries of London (3rd ed., 1927), pp. 362–77. The new list, here put forward, is intended to bring the information from those two books of reference up to date, after nearly twenty years. British libraries are briefly listed among ‘Medical libraries outside North America’ in the Medical Library Association's A handbook of medical library practice, ed. Janet Doe, Chicago, American library association 1943, chapter 1, appendix 2, pages 41–64. The meagre information in that list, if contrasted with the detailed documentation of American and Canadian libraries in successive issues of the American medical directory, accentuates the need for us to know ourselves better. Several, perhaps many, medical librarians have had to compile lists of kindred libraries for their own convenience. A list which I had thus prepared seemed to Aslib to offer adequate basis for a Directory of British medical libraries, and in order to complete it Aslib issued a questionnaire in the autumn of 1944 to libraries known to possess medical collections and to hospitals, medical societies, and medical institutions throughout the British Isles. The information obtained from the generous response to this questionnaire is epitomized in the list which follows. I am responsible for all omissions and errors and I hope that those who detect any will supply corrections and additions so that this preliminary list may be revised and become a definitive Directory.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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