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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Kimberly Camrass

This paper aims to investigate how futures concepts may further existing regenerative sustainability thinking.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how futures concepts may further existing regenerative sustainability thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews existing regenerative fields, including regenerative design, regenerative development and regenerative sustainability as alternatives to conventional sustainability practice. It considers futures concepts that may deepen regenerative thinking and practice to develop a regenerative futures conceptual model.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how regenerative fields and futures studies have the capacity to reciprocally inform one another and builds upon this relationship through the development of a regenerative futures conceptual model.

Originality/value

This paper makes a number of theoretical contributions. First, it demonstrates how regenerative fields and futures thinking may reciprocally inform one another and, subsequently, enrich regenerative practice. Second, by drawing from futures thinking, it questions and ultimately lengthens notions of reality and time from a regenerative perspective. Finally, through the proposal of a regenerative futures conceptual model, it offers an alternative lens to analyse human behaviours and their associated impacts. In this way, it introduces a theoretical model that is focused on deep individual and collective transformation and a starting point for future research and refinement.

Details

foresight, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Loretta Bellato and Joseph M. Cheer

Using case study analysis, this paper aims to examine the application of capacity development perspectives, critical towards urban tourism that is inclusive and regenerative.

Abstract

Purpose

Using case study analysis, this paper aims to examine the application of capacity development perspectives, critical towards urban tourism that is inclusive and regenerative.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design used a mixed qualitative methods approach underpinned by the inclusive tourism development framework following Scheyvens and Biddulph (2017). This comprised in-depth interviews, focus groups and observational research. A community-based approach was adopted in a diverse cultural and socio-economic field setting.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that people who are marginalised hold valuable tacit knowledge and unique skills that can complement expert tourism knowledge and contribute to the development of more sustainable places and inclusive communities. This finding challenges claims that capacity development must occur before their participation. Local government, alongside non-government organisations and community groups, were found to have a significant role to play in ensuring that residents and people who are marginalised are included in sustainable tourism development.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the burgeoning discourse regarding stakeholder capacity development and readiness for inclusion in urban tourism initiatives. Importantly, regenerative development approaches are applied within the gambit of capacity development making this a unique attempt to integrate stakeholders into the design and implementation of tourism planning processes that uphold inclusive and regenerative priorities.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Steven Liaros

Whilst the energy transition from fossil fuels to renewables offers significant environmental benefits, the other transition – from a centralised to a distributed energy…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst the energy transition from fossil fuels to renewables offers significant environmental benefits, the other transition – from a centralised to a distributed energy system – underpins a disruptive model for planning cities, towns and villages. A local energy micro-grid can power a local water micro-grid, which in turn can irrigate a local food system, offering a community the opportunity to harvest, store and distribute food, water and energy within their immediate catchment. A distributed network of regenerative villages, connected virtually and with shared electric vehicles is offered as an alternative vision for future cities. The paper aims to justify this as a preferred model for human settlements and develop an implementation process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper asks: Is it inevitable that large cities will keep growing, while rural communities will continue to be deprived of resources and opportunities? Is the flow of people into cities inevitable? To answer this question, the adopted methodology is to take a systems approach, observing town planning processes from a range of different disciplines and perspectives.

Findings

By contrasting the current centralising city model with a distributed network of villages, this paper offers ten reasons why the distributed network is preferable to centralisation.

Research limitations/implications

It is argued that in this time of dramatic technological upheaval, environmental destruction and social inequality, business-as-usual is unacceptable in any field of human endeavour. This paper presents a sketch outlining a new human settlement theory, a different way of living on the land. It is an invitation to academics and practitioners to participate in a debate.

Originality/value

The information and energy revolutions, both distributed systems, are reshaping cities.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2016

Andrea Frank and Terry Marsden

Regionalism implying some form of city-region or metropolitan-level planning and governance has long been promoted for multiple reasons albeit with varied success…

Abstract

Regionalism implying some form of city-region or metropolitan-level planning and governance has long been promoted for multiple reasons albeit with varied success. Experiencing a resurgence in 1990s, regional coordination and cooperation has proven effective in pursuing economic development and bolstering competitiveness. Unfortunately, other voices, such as those promoting regional scale land use planning and management to cultivate more sustainable urban form and settlement patterns became comparatively crowded out. With climate change-related environmental and ecological pressures mounting, the chapter suggests it is time to frame regions as socio-ecological rather than mere socio-economic spaces, thereby placing greater emphasis on ecosystems and ecological land management and a circular, regenerative economy. Using the city-region of Stuttgart (Germany) as exemplar, our contribution initiates an exploration into whether statutory regional planning in combination with various informal tools and a multi-level governance framework allows actors to begin to embed and implement these emerging ecological sustainability concepts.

Details

Metropolitan Ruralities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-796-7

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Abstract

Details

Evolving Leadership for Collective Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-878-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Roya Bonyad, Mahdi Hamzenejad and Mohammadali Khanmohammadi

The purpose of this paper is to propose a hierarchically structured system of regenerative architecture indicators for assessing research-educational building projects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a hierarchically structured system of regenerative architecture indicators for assessing research-educational building projects.

Design/methodology/approach

First, based on a literature review of the historical roots of regenerative design and related approaches and the interviews held with experts of the related field, the paper proposes a structured framework of architectural indicators suitable for the context of Tehran. Later, the importance of criteria is estimated by the analytic hierarchy process method based on a survey of experts. Finally, the results clarify the order of indicators’ importance for enhancing research-educational buildings with the aim of developing regenerative design in the context.

Findings

The rankings revealed that, in the environmental dimension, “Design of site & building” and “Site & context considerations” are the top priorities of learning spaces in Tehran followed by “Water management,” “Energy management” and “Materials & waste management” ranked as less significant, but still important indicators. In the social dimension, “Design for people & human health” was considered much more important than “Social interaction” and “Interaction with nature,” and in the cultural dimension, “vernacular & historical features of design” was more important than “Aesthetic feature.” In the economic dimension, “Energy storage & production” indicator was ranked highest followed by “Adaptability & multiplicity of design solutions” and “Using waste to produce new resources.” Generally, for achieving regenerative architecture in learning spaces, the environmental criterion was given the highest weight among all dimensions. After that, the higher rank was given to social dimension; while cultural and economic dimensions took the third and fourth place.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has limitations because of the limited number of experts in the field of regenerative approach.

Originality/value

This research seeks to answer the following question: what is the ranking of regenerative architecture indicators in the design of research-educational building projects in the context of Tehran? To answer this question, the indicators of regenerative design in the architectural field are explored through a detailed study of literature and interview with experts of the related field; later, they are ranked based on a survey approach that investigates the opinions of experts. The final results are then explained based on logical analysis to obtain a comprehensive understanding. The prioritization of indicators actually provides a simple framework for designers and architects to have a clear path in developing an architectural regenerative project when different contexts vary in influential features. The selection and prioritization of indicators in this research depended mainly on their relevance to the conditions of Tehran and can be used for regions with similar conditions as well.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Daniel Bergquist, Christine A. Hempel and John Lööf Green

This paper aims to describe an exploratory research and design process that uses illustrative techniques to bridge the gap between theoretical principles of systems…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an exploratory research and design process that uses illustrative techniques to bridge the gap between theoretical principles of systems ecology, stakeholder input and a workable physical planning strategy for Ultuna Campus in Uppsala, Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

Stakeholder interviews provide the empirical basis for this exploratory design process, in conjunction with landscape analysis, and review of previous proposals for campus development. Central principles of self-organizing systems are selected and concretized as visionary hypotheses in a physical context. Preliminary design concepts and plans illustrate sustainable systems while supporting new functional programmatic requirements: housing, industry-research collaboration, transportation and community-integrated landscapes.

Findings

The result is a proposal based on regenerative landscape design, envisioning campus Ultuna as a coherent whole.

Research limitations/implications

A large-scale modern building program is already underway at Ultuna, and rapid urbanization in the surrounding region coupled with projected growth on campus suggests future intensification of university lands. A master plan to be implemented until 2040 is now in the preliminary design phase. Ultuna is home to significant cultural and ecological landscapes, and a holistic approach is called for.

Practical implications

Illustrative techniques suggest ways to synthesize knowledge by creating future scenarios that are workable in practice.

Social implications

Global challenges call for designs that enhance environmental and human resources and their capacity to regenerate over time. Sustainability objectives are particularly crucial when envisioning university campuses; the environment serves as a laboratory for researchers, teachers, students and residents of the surrounding community.

Originality/value

This paper describes an innovative process for bridging ecological principles, stakeholder perspectives and practical design strategies for sustainable campuses.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Evolving Leadership for Collective Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-878-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Francis J. Quail, Thomas Scanlon and Matthew Strickland

The purpose of this paper is to present a method of rapid prototyping (RP) used in the development of a regenerative pump impeller. RP technology was used to create…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a method of rapid prototyping (RP) used in the development of a regenerative pump impeller. RP technology was used to create complex impeller blade profiles for testing as part of a regenerative pump optimisation process. Regenerative pumps are the subject of increased interest in industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten modified impeller blade profiles, relative to the standard radial configuration, were evaluated with the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental testing. Prototype impellers were needed for experimental validation of the CFD results. The manufacture of the complex blade profiles using conventional milling techniques is a considerable challenge for skilled machinists.

Findings

The complexity of the modified blade profiles would normally necessitate the use of expensive computer numerically controlled machining with five‐axis capability. With an impeller less than 75 mm in diameter with a maximum blade thickness of 1.3 mm, a rapid manufacturing technique enabled production of complex blade profiles that are dimensionally accurate and structurally robust enough for testing.

Research limitations/implications

As more advanced RP machines become available in the study in the coming months, e.g. selective laser sintering, the strength of the parts particularly for higher speed testing will improve and the amount of post processing operations will reduce.

Practical implications

This technique offers the possibility to produce components of increased complexity whilst ensuring quality, strength, performance and speed of manufacture.

Originality/value

The ability to manufacture complex blade profiles that are robust enough for testing, in a rapid and cost effective manner is proving essential in the overall design optimisation process for the regenerative pump.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Jafar Nejad, Alireza Riasi and Ahmad Nourbakhsh

Regenerative flow pump (RFP) is a rotodynamic turbomachine capable of developing high pressure rise at low flow rates. This paper aims to numerically investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Regenerative flow pump (RFP) is a rotodynamic turbomachine capable of developing high pressure rise at low flow rates. This paper aims to numerically investigate the performance of a regenerative pump considering the modification in blade and casing geometry.

Design/methodology/approach

The radial blade shape was changed to the bucket form and a core is added to flow path. A parametric study was performed to improve the performance of the pump. Thus, the effect of change in blade angle, chord, height, pitch to chord ratio and also inlet port on the performance of RFP was investigated.

Findings

Results showed that the modified blade angle to achieve the maximum efficiency is about 41 degree. Also, the most efficient point occurs close to pitch/chord = 0.4 and by reducing the axial chord, efficiency of the pump increases. It was found that better efficiency will be achieved by increasing the “Arc of admission”, but there are limitations of manufacturing. It was observed that the performance curves shifted towards lower flow coefficients by reducing height of blades.

Originality/value

To improve the characteristics of regenerative pump, the blade shape changed to the bucket form (airfoil blades with identical inlet and outlet angle) and a core is added to flow path. A parametric study has been accomplished to see the influence of some important parameters on the performance of the pump.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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