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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Choun Pei Wong and David Ng

An education system can only be successful if it can develop future-ready learners who can continue to learn after graduation, take on their future lifework and thrive in…

Abstract

Purpose

An education system can only be successful if it can develop future-ready learners who can continue to learn after graduation, take on their future lifework and thrive in the future society and environment. This article examines the economic, social and environmental trajectories of Singapore and proposes that it is important for future-ready learners to develop habits of practices that will support the skills, knowledge and values that are pertinent to these trajectories.

Design/methodology/approach

School leaders are responsible for creating environments and implementing practices that are conducive for fostering habits of practices that are crucial for future-ready outcomes. The authors discuss the inadequacies of traditional teaching and learning practices in supporting these habits and elucidate how newer paradigms such as constructivism, connectivism, coagency and communities of practice might be more useful in achieving this. The authors also present a case study of a school leadership preparation programme that aims to develop future-ready learners.

Findings

This paper provides insights into how newer paradigms of teaching and learning can be supportive for developing desirable habits of practices for future readiness.

Originality/value

This discussion piece introduces a fresh concept – habits of practices – that is relevant in preparing future-ready learners in Singapore.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

A. Georges L. Romme and Arjen van Witteloostuijn

The organizational learning literature distinguishes different levels of learning (zero learning and single, double and triple loop learning) in order to understand the…

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Abstract

The organizational learning literature distinguishes different levels of learning (zero learning and single, double and triple loop learning) in order to understand the complexity and dynamics of changes in policies, objectives, mental maps, and structures and strategies for learning. This article explores the case of an emerging new organizational design, the circular organization, in order to understand the role of triple loop learning. The circular model was developed on the basis of ideas about the relationship between organizational structure and behavior taken from theories of dynamic systems. Circular design precepts appear to provide a structural facilitation of single and double loop learning. In this respect, the circular design tends to act as a facilitating infrastructure for triple loop learning, that is, exploring the structural opportunities and key competences people need to participate in making well‐informed choices about policies, objectives and other issues.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Javier Castro-Spila

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new framework for developing social innovation competencies in social sciences within the agenda of the Relational University. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new framework for developing social innovation competencies in social sciences within the agenda of the Relational University. It explores the educational strategy promoted by the Social Innovation Excubator (SIE), an experimental social sciences lab that provides students with a work-based learning scenario focusing on the solution of social problems.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper explores a new learning strategy to promote the Relational University. This exploration designs an experimental infrastructure named SIE. This infrastructure promotes the link between work-based learning and social innovation to develop four key competencies: heuristic, epistemic, relational and experimental skills.

Findings

There is little attention in the literature about work-based learning and social innovation. The conceptual framework provides a program on Social Innovation Capitalization (SIC) in the framework of the SIE. This framework provides a process of four phases to prototype social innovations: exploration, experimentation, exploitation and evaluation as a process to boost social innovation skills.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework of Relational University is an innovative and integrative model (companies, social organizations, public sector and civil society) that develops a work-based learning strategy through SIE infrastructure. The SIE has a strong implication for social sciences developing an experimental space to explore, exploit and evaluate local social problems.

Practical implications

The SIE infrastructure and the SIC program promotes a new strategy in social sciences to boost employability (new competencies), entrepreneurship (pilot social organizations) and intra-entrepreneurship (social innovation in organizations).

Originality/value

This paper proposes a conceptual and empirical framework to develop the Relational University through a new learning strategy linking work-based learning and social innovation. This practical framework covers a lack in the work-based learning perspective opening a new line of research linked to social innovation.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Arunprasad P.

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize and empirically test the impact of strategic human resource management (HRM) practices on learning outcomes and also to…

1553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize and empirically test the impact of strategic human resource management (HRM) practices on learning outcomes and also to examine whether this relationship is contingent on knowledge strategy in a sample of knowledge-intensive firms like software companies in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire, and the software companies were chosen based on the listing in the NASSCOM annual report. A total of 32 companies participated in this research study, and the survey was conducted in two phases.

Findings

The universalistic approach revealed that organizational learning outcomes can be enhanced by focusing on specific individual HRM practices. Also, the fit between HRM practices and knowledge strategy revealed that the interaction effect between individual and knowledge strategy have had an increased impact on the learning outcomes.

Practical implications

HRM practices can be aligned to the targeted knowledge strategy of the organization and maximize specific organizational learning outcome to achieve sustained competitive advantage. Knowledge-intensive firms can measure their knowledge strategy and gauge whether it is complemented with HRM practices for better tangible and intangible outcomes.

Originality/value

The proposed model can benefit the firms to analyse the extent of contribution of HRM practices towards the organizational learning process. It also helps to understand how an organization can be productive by focusing on specific learning outcomes and establishing a tighter link between the select individual HRM practices and the defined knowledge strategy.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Mirghani Mohamed, Michael Stankosky and Arthur Murray

Aims to impart new insights into the role of information technology (IT) in knowledge extraction, capture, distribution and personalization. The paper seeks to pin‐point

7546

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to impart new insights into the role of information technology (IT) in knowledge extraction, capture, distribution and personalization. The paper seeks to pin‐point the strengths and weaknesses of IT in the domain of knowledge management (KM) and to explain why the technology promise remains unfulfilled, as seen by many KM practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion in this paper is fundamentally based on Stankosky's four KM pillars conceptual framework. Within this framework the authors attempted to shed some light on the IT role and the hidden reasons that make knowledge prominently unreachable via IT.

Findings

IT assimilation and representation of knowledge intangibility, dynamism, experience and other humanistic cognitive dimensions remain debatable. The current technology is immature to resolve such problems. For IT to be effective for KM it must shred its bivalent logic and instead learn to operate within an authentic continuum.

Originality/value

Knowledge managers need to understand that a KM initiative that considers IT as a Utopian panacea will fail. Equally, the KM initiative that undervalues IT will follow suit. Owing to IT immaturity in the area of cognitive behavior, the situation is still perplexing. This elusiveness imposes some obstacles to sufficiently represent the context of tacit knowledge. Hence, codifying knowledge with the poser of the existing IT and without the support from socio‐cultural inputs, will result in de‐contextualization, i.e. “knowledge dilution.” Hence, special considerations should be given to applications that offer some behavioral context and human cognitive dimensions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Asher Ramish and Haris Aslam

– The purpose of this paper is to propose performance measures for supply chain knowledge management (SCKM) performance.

1911

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose performance measures for supply chain knowledge management (SCKM) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual study. State of performance measurement has been analyzed on the basis of a comprehensive review of literature in field of SCKM. Based on principles of double and triple loop learning, performance measures have been identified for measuring the success of KM practices in SCs.

Findings

Principles of double and triple loop learning have been utilized to suggest KPI’s for SCKM performance, i.e. supply chain identity and knowledge supply chain stratum. The relevance and justification of these KPI’s is also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to conceptualized measures for SCKM only. Further research is required to test the benefits of these performance measures based on industry applications.

Practical implications

These proposed KPI’s will facilitate the development of the new processes through re-engineering, i.e. problem identification and then rectification. Further, these KPI’s will provide some essential insights as to how supply chains can develop their performance evaluation systems to become more effective and learning oriented.

Originality/value

This study aims to not only identify the gaps present in the SCKM performance measurement literature but also aims to fill the knowledge gap by suggesting suitable performance metrics.

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Arunprasad P.

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of strategic human resource management (HRM) practices and knowledge strategies on the performance of a sample of…

2041

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of strategic human resource management (HRM) practices and knowledge strategies on the performance of a sample of software companies in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample chosen for this study was software professionals in India; the software companies were chosen based on their listing in the NASSCOM annual report, with financial turnover as the basis for classification. In order to measure the tangible and intangible outcomes, instruments used in this study include financial and non-economic performance.

Findings

As per the contingency approach, the fit between strategic HRM practices (staffing, general training, specific training, performance appraisal, performance feedback, reward and compensation and employee development) and knowledge strategy dimensions (consolidator, transformer and co-inventor) was observed and the results revealed that the moderation effect has had a positive impact on the firms’ performance.

Practical implications

Investment in specific developmental programs for high-potential employees and quick learners will make knowledge-intensive firms financially sound in the long run. Through an appropriate reward strategy, employees who are capable of lateral and innovative thinking at work can be engaged in consistently delivering quality projects, which will have a significant positive impact on overall project costs and the financial performance of the firm.

Originality/value

The proposed model in this study can enhance a firm’s performance, provided the firm adopts a specific knowledge strategy and coherently aligns it with strategic HRM practices to achieve a sustained competitive advantage.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Richard P. Winter, James C. Sarros and George A. Tanewski

This paper presents an organizational learning framework for reframing management practices within large bureaucratic organizations. Reviewing the relevant literature, the…

Abstract

This paper presents an organizational learning framework for reframing management practices within large bureaucratic organizations. Reviewing the relevant literature, the paper argues managers' control orientations and practices effectively stifle learning and personal development by severely limiting the ability of employees to exert control or change the nature of their work activities. To encourage organizational learning, a number of reframing tools are proposed The paper concludes by discussing how reframing tools may be used in conjunction with other psychoanalytic techniques to challenge and change managers' control orientations and practices.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Janette Bennett

Current government policy requires that all acute Trusts will have an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) by 2005 but there is no additional funding for such expensive…

1878

Abstract

Current government policy requires that all acute Trusts will have an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) by 2005 but there is no additional funding for such expensive technology. Instead funding must be found by reviewing internal policies and procedures. Such extensive organisational process review is an opportunity to bring about organisational learning but there is no government guidance on how to bring this about and a dichotomy exists within organisational learning theory. This paper investigates if teams are the bridge between divergent schools of thought on organisational learning, and considers if they are the mechanism to bring about both organisational learning and the delivery of a successful EPR implementation, the stated aim of government policy.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Michael Grant Wofford, Andrea D. Ellinger and Karen E. Watkins

This study aims to examine the process of informal learning of aviation instructors.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the process of informal learning of aviation instructors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative instrumental case study design was used for this study. In‐depth, multiple semi‐structured interviews and document review were the primary approaches to data collection and the data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The Marsick, Watkins, Callahan, and Volpe reconceptualized model of informal and incidental learning underpinned this study.

Findings

Findings support prior research on the catalysts, strategies, and lessons learned that are associated with informal learning. However, a key finding of this study was capturing the complexity of the informal learning process for aviation instructors as they faced the daily challenges associated with facilitating their students' learning which served as the catalyst for their learning.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study are not intended to be generalizable to populations beyond this specific study due to limitations associated with the site selection, purposeful sample selection criteria, and sample size. Additionally, the unique nature of the aviation field and temporal considerations prevent the generalizability of the results of this study.

Originality/value

Despite the growing base of research on informal learning, calls for research that continues to examine how certain characteristics of workers and their work environment influence informal learning, and research that provides more holistic understandings of this type of learning have been requested. This research responds to these calls by exploring the process of informal learning among aviation instructors. The catalysts for informal learning, the strategies used, and lessons learned are identified. More importantly, unlike previous research, the complexity of the process of informal learning is captured and illustrated as a cyclical, non‐linear, non‐sequential process that is highly intertwined with teaching in this aviation context. The careful documentation of the actual learning process provides thick, rich data to deepen our understanding of what this kind of learning actually looks like.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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