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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Khar Kheng Yeoh

This Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research is a part of the larger study grant to analyze written reflections through learning log among the third and final year…

Abstract

Purpose

This Scholarship of Teaching and Learning research is a part of the larger study grant to analyze written reflections through learning log among the third and final year students undertaking BPME 3073 Entrepreneurship module in University Utara Malaysia (UUM). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection techniques are researcher-directed textual data through reflective learning log, taken from 140 students from three classes. A thematic approach was utilized to present the reflections of the students and all data were recorded in a verbatim format.

Findings

The findings show that most students have never written a reflective log or essay in the formative assessment. As a consequence, they had difficulty in writing the reflection when being requested to do so. A total 75 (approximately 55 percent) of the reflective logs were identified as level 1 (from 1 to 5 percent) in which reflections were simply written in a descriptive manner, resulted in a balance of 61 learning logs being utilized for further analysis. The students’ reflections on their entrepreneurship’s experience systematically categorize into four different themes comprised of: the nature of entrepreneurship module, entrepreneurial characteristics, opportunity recognition, and creativity and innovation.

Research limitations/implications

As for the limitation of the study, it is important to not to underestimate the challenges of introducing a grade assessment that most of them are not familiar with in their university academic journey. Students need guidance, assurance and confidence writing something that require personal opinion, own thinking, sensitive and personal nature of narration. For most students as found out in this study, self-confessional writing is hard to come by (they dare not attempt it in the first place), only a handful appreciating the writing start with “I,” “me” as first person. More research in this study should be conducted across the university to gauge the response from the students to see if the result of this study is only applicable to this group of students or to this discipline of studies. The researchers would also like to recommend for future studies which take the form of a longitudinal study of similar kind to examine the problems and challenges with regards to promoting learning reflection at the undergraduate level.

Practical implications

Based on the result of the 61 students who had demonstrated an ability in reflective writing, it is suggested that perhaps the university should consider offering coursework that contains a component of reflective writing as part of the assessment. As such, if this is implemented, students of such ability like the one in this sample group would have been benefitted from such assessment which look at reflective ability (Greene, 2014) and which they were allowed to form a broader perspective in relation to the module undertaken. This in turns will foster the growth of reflective ability which is recognized as a learned behavior (Gustafson and Bennett, 1999). In addition, for the future exercise of this reflective learning log, the researcher opined that we should encourage our students to engage with another student (e.g. close friend) in a way that encourages talking with, questioning, or confronting, helped the reflective process by placing the learner in a safe environment in which self-revelation can take place. In addition, students were able to distance themselves from their actions, ideas and beliefs, by holding them up for scrutiny in the company of a peer with whom they are willing to take such risks (Hatton and Smith, 1995).

Originality/value

The results of this research have strongly suggested the need to urgently develop among the students the skills in writing reflectively as they go through the process of higher education which is useful in molding their future professional and entrepreneurial behavior as when they entered the job market which requires a critical reasoning ability.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Jane Yann Ching Chang, Abdelhafid Benamraoui and Alison Rieple

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of income generation projects as a pedagogic method to assess students’ learning about social enterprises. The authors are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of income generation projects as a pedagogic method to assess students’ learning about social enterprises. The authors are interested in how and why this innovative approach might improve students’ understanding of the different aspects and attributes of social entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used thematic analysis of qualitative data comprising the reflective logs of 87 students on an undergraduate entrepreneurship module in a university business programme. The major attributes of social entrepreneurship were identified from a review of literature, and the paper uses the logs to judge whether students had learnt about these attributes.

Findings

The results show that students developed an understanding concerning social enterprises’ diverse stakeholder environment, market needs, social enterprises’ ideological foundations, resource mobilisation processes and performance measurement – both social and financial. In addition, they developed skills in reflection and self-awareness, communication, empathy and the generation of new ideas.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in that it focused on only one cohort of students, undergraduates. The authors cannot claim that the findings are generalisable to other students or contexts.

Practical implications

Students are better able to understand the needs and values of social enterprises. However, this is a resource intensive process for educators with implications for curriculum design and management.

Social implications

This study sheds new light on how experiential learning helps to raise students’ awareness of social enterprises.

Originality/value

This study sheds new light on how experiential learning in the form of income generation projects helps to raise students’ awareness of social enterprises. Its value lies in helping to develop a novel and effective pedagogy for entrepreneurial learning.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Craig Johnson and David Philip Spicer

Purpose – Action learning has long been a recognized mechanism for ensuring deep and effective learning. The purpose of this paper is to describe an MBA program where the…

Abstract

Purpose – Action learning has long been a recognized mechanism for ensuring deep and effective learning. The purpose of this paper is to describe an MBA program where the approach to study is informed and driven by action learning. Design methodology/approach – The nature, ethos, and theoretical foundations of this degree are described. Action learning principles are outlined, the design of the course is described and its contribution to participants and their organizations considered. Findings – The effectiveness of an action learning approach in management education is demonstrated through consideration of the program, the nature of the learning experience it entails, students' experiences and their uptake of learning, examples of which are discussed in the paper. Research limitations/implications – The paper shows how a program can be formulated with action learning at its core and some of the implications of doing so. It also discusses the impact that action learning has on the effectiveness of participants in the workplace. Originality/value – Take‐up of an action learning approach in formal management education has been slow, the paper offers a unique example of how this can be integral to a course and lead individuals to develop new managerial mindsets.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Virginia Cathro, Paula O’Kane and Deb Gilbertson

The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways in which business educators can interact successfully with reflective learning journals (RLJs). Specifically, the research was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways in which business educators can interact successfully with reflective learning journals (RLJs). Specifically, the research was interested in how students used RLJs and how educators assessed these RLJs.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 RLJs, submitted as part of an international communication course involving a global virtual team exercise, were analysed. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes discussed by participants, while content analysis, based upon Kolb’s learning cycle, was used to assess the depth of student reflection.

Findings

Students appear to have engaged with depth and understanding and were able to articulate their skill level, but there was variance in their reflective ability across different skills.

Practical implications

An interpretation of Kolb’s (1984) learning cycle as a method to assist educators to assess RLJs is presented. Specifically, educators need to provide more guidance to students to enhance their ability to reflect. The authors suggest that a rubric based on Kolb could fulfil this objective.

Originality/value

This study responds to the call for more research examining depth of reflection (Lien et al., 2012); it also offers contribution to the variety of models characterising reflective depth (Ash and Clayton, 2009; Chamberlain, 2012; Lien et al., 2012) drawn from experiential learning in the form of written RLJs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2013

Susannah Diamond and Brian Irwin

The paper aims to explore staff practices in using e‐learning to embed sustainability literacy, highlight best practice and determine areas for improvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore staff practices in using e‐learning to embed sustainability literacy, highlight best practice and determine areas for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework of four areas for developing student sustainability literacy (SSL) was proposed as a basis for analysing practice. A literature review then explored the extent to which e‐learning is used to support embedding SSL in the curriculum, and the types of e‐learning currently in use for this.

Findings

E‐learning tools were most frequently used to provide flexible access to information, followed by support for communication and collaboration, and were less frequently used for the development of specific skills, personal identity and confidence.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of case studies provided only limited evidence. A survey of practitioners could be undertaken to explore and validate the issues raised by the literature review.

Practical implications

The review highlighted scope for a pedagogical shift away from using e‐learning for information delivery and practical communication, and towards supporting rich, student‐centred forms of learning in both blended and distance learning modes.

Social implications

This shift would create more powerful learning experiences for students, more effectively develop students' personal identities and skills, and yield graduates who are more confident in their ability to create more sustainable futures.

Originality/value

This paper will be of value to academic staff and educational developers looking to develop practice in embedding SSL in teaching and learning, and to harness the potential of e‐learning.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Clare Gately and James Cunningham

Business plan writing seems the panacea to gain stakeholder legitimacy and financial backing. Our chapter explores the contributions and disconnections between business…

Abstract

Business plan writing seems the panacea to gain stakeholder legitimacy and financial backing. Our chapter explores the contributions and disconnections between business plan writing and the start-up process for incubated technology entrepreneurs. The study is set in the South East Enterprise Platform Programme (SEEPP), an incubator programme for technology graduate entrepreneurs in the South East of Ireland. Using a purposive sample of technology entrepreneurs in start-up mode, we took a qualitative approach consisting of content analysis of 40 business plans and in-depth interviews with 25 technology entrepreneurs. Our research found that writing a detailed business plan constrains the technology entrepreneur’s natural penchant for action, compelling them to focus on business plan writing rather than enactment. Technology entrepreneurs favour a market-led rather than funding-led operational level document to plan, and learn from, near-term activities using milestones.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Arthur Morgan and David Turner

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute…

Abstract

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD). A case study approach is used to reflect on findings related to the first two cohorts. It concludes that the benefits of the opportunity to gain a separate professional qualification are twofold. First, it ties in closely with what appears is a more strategic career decision‐making process on behalf of the student and, second, the CIPD qualification provides a robust framework for the placement period during this important stage of student studies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Bob Little

An outline of the 2015-2016 industry benchmark report produced by Towards Maturity, a benchmarking research company that provides independent advice and support to help…

Abstract

Purpose

An outline of the 2015-2016 industry benchmark report produced by Towards Maturity, a benchmarking research company that provides independent advice and support to help organisations use learning technologies to accelerate business performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the report and highlights some of the key findings from the research – and the conclusions drawn.

Design/methodology/approach

A report, making use of research data from more than 600 learning and development (L & D) professionals in 55 countries and inputs from 1,600 learners. It also sets out comments and conclusions by those closely involved in the research.

Findings

Among the many findings contained in the report are that: L & D professionals have high aspirations for their role; top performing organisations actively support the self-directed learner, as well as equip their L & D teams to cope with and lead change; evidence from top performing organisations highlights that business leaders now expect more – and different – things from their L & D professionals; and all L & D professionals are responding to the changing corporate learning climate by looking to improve their: efficiency; processes; organisational productivity and engagement; business responsiveness and learning culture.

Research limitations/implications

As with all surveys – even those, like this one, which include a significant sample – this report is only as valuable as those surveyed are representative of the L & D sector and of corporate learning. However, the benchmarking survey covers 55 countries and over 2,000 people.

Practical implications

This is the 12th year of the Towards Maturity benchmarking study, so this year’s data rests on a wealth of previous data – to provide information on trends in learning and L & D. Moreover, the study’s results show how L & D is changing in its relationship with businesses and business leaders – and how this needs to develop further.

Social implications

For L & D professionals, taking advantage of benchmarking – and applying the lessons of research such as those revealed by Towards Maturity – can result in: lower costs – through discovering more cost-effective processes and systems; improved quality in terms of such things as products, services and customer care; and increasing sales and profits – through understanding how to improve functions, operations, products, services, pre- and post-sales customer care, as well as lower costs.

Originality/value

No organisation other than Towards Maturity carries out a benchmark survey such as this.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Kristel Miller, Rodney McAdam, Sandra Moffett and Michael Brennan

This paper focuses on the university science park incubator element of the technology transfer process where knowledge in a variety of forms needs to be retained and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on the university science park incubator element of the technology transfer process where knowledge in a variety of forms needs to be retained and maintained. The aim is to investigate the networking competencies of stakeholders involved in the university technology transfer process using absorptive capacity theory to explore how knowledge is externally retained and maintained through these network relations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertakes an inductive theory building approach using in‐depth multiple stakeholder interviews (n=30). The transcripts and results were analysed using open coding and NVivo. Six technology transfer meetings were also observed.

Findings

The findings show that developing and maintaining network relationships can significantly aid the development and retention of knowledge within the university technology transfer process. It was found that conscious effort is made to retain relationships with network stakeholders. Prior knowledge, partner knowledge complementarity and reciprocity, resulting in collective learning, were found to motivate stakeholders to engage in external knowledge retention strategies. The results also supported suggestions in previous literature that relative capacity is an antecedent for absorptive capacity within organisations.

Research limitations/mplications

The paper helps in establishing a research agenda for knowledge retention in technology transfer where traditionally the emphasis has been on development of knowledge. The absorptive capacity framework provides a consistent theoretical basis for exploring the role of stakeholders in this area.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on how knowledge can be retained in technology transfer settings rather than being restricted to that of development. The use of the absorptive capacity framework has also enabled the concept of relative capacity to be developed within the research giving much needed empirical investigation into its relevance and feasibility.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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